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March 17, 1968 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-03-17

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, March 17, 1968

Page Six THE MICHiGAN DAILY

1 i

THOMPSON'S PIZIA
announces
CHICKEN DINNERS
-Free Delivery-
HALFACHICKEN, FRENCH FRIES
ROLL and HONEY-$1.75
761-0001
Daily C lassifieds Get ResulItsI

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN'T
The Daily Official Bulletin is as
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan ialy assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be publisheda maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only,
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication. For more
information call 764-9270.
SUNDAY, MARCH 17
Day Calendar
School of Music Recital - Susan
Nelson, Bassoon: School of Music Re-
cital Hall, 2:30 p.m.
School of Music Degree Recital --
Nancy Wilson, Piano: School of Music
Recital Hall, 4:30 p.m.
School of Music Degree Recital -
Robert Thompson, Organ: Hill Aud-
itorium, 4:30 p.m.
Cinema Guild - Jacques Demy's
Lola: Architecture Auditorium, 7:00
and 9:05 p.m.
(Continued on Page 10)

COMMUNIST HOLD DISSOLVING:

East Europe Challenges the Old Order

WASHINGtON (P)-Communist
East Europe is entering a new and
critical period of political unrest
which probably will erode further
the Kremlin's once strong hold on
the bloc.
This is the opinion of U.S. ex-
perts who, with great interest and
considerable delight, have been
watching the wave of challenge
to the old order sweeping through
Czechoslovakia and Poland.
Resembles '56 Ferment
The scene in some ways resem-
bles the 1956 ferment which erupt-
ed in bloodily suppressed revolts
in Hungary and Poland, but U.S.
observers expect change to come
more peacefully this time.
From Czechoslovakia, reports tell
almost daily of bitter infighting
among Communist leaders as a
more liberal minded faction fol-
lows through on its victory last
January in deposing hard-liner
President Antonin Novotny as par-
ty boss.

Czech Maj. Gen. Jan Sejna, a
Novotny associate, fled to the
United States at the end of Feb-
ruary. He was the highest ranking
Communist ever to defect to the
West. Last week's developments
included the announced suicide
of another pro-Novotny general,
Deputy Defense Minister Vladimir
Janko, and dismissal of the in-

tenor minister and attorney gen-
eral.
U.S. specialists rate the Prague
contest as primarily a power
struggle in the party leadership
rather than a surge by rank and
file Czech citizens. And they be-
lieve the new leadership at this
stage is interested more in liber-
alizing domestic reforms than in

any foreign policy change.
Washington observers are di-
vided over what may happen in
Poland. University youths are en-
tering their third week of riotous
rallies and classroom boycotts in
cities across that land.
One theory here is that student
defiance of the Gomulka regime
will result in a crackdown, with

The Week To Come: A Campus Calendar

SUNDAY, March 17
3 p.m.-Edward Page, founder
and president of the Socio-Eco-
nomic Institute, will speak in the
third Challenge '68 lecture series
in Aud. E, P&A. Reactor panel will
include Professors Robert Angell,
Steven Tonsor and Ann Arbor
businessman Sam Harmon.
WEDNESDAY, March 20
8 p.m. - Prof. Horace Crane,
chairman of the physics depart-'
ment, will deliver the Henry Rus-
sel Lecture on "The Changing
World of Physics and Some Ad-

vantages Therein" in the Rack-
ham Amphitheatre.
8:30 p.m.-The University Sym-
phony Band will present a pro-
gram in Hill Aud.
THURSDAY, March 21
7:30 p.m.-Prof. John Platt, di-
rector of the Mental Health Re-
search Institute, and Prof. Law-
rence Slobodkin of the zoology de-
partment will give an Honors
Council "Dialogue on Utopia" in
the Rackham Aud.
8 p.m.-The Music School opera
will be Smetana's "The Bartered

-----------

0A

/
---,. ---
> >

DELI * HOUSE

Bride" in the Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre.
SATURDAY, March 23
8 p.m.-The Music School opera
will be Smetana's "The Bartered
Bride" in the Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre.
8:30 p.m.-The University Men's
Glee Club will give a performance
in Hill Aud.
FRIDAY, March 22
8 p.m.-The Music School opera
will be Smetana's "The Bartered
Bride" in the Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre.
8:30 p.m.-The San Jietro Or-
chestra of Naples under Renato
Ruotolo will play in the Rackham
Aud.
SUNDAY, March 24
4:30 p.m.--William Rusher, pub-
lisher of National Review, will give
the Honors Council "The Disillu-
sioned Society and Visions of
Utopia" in Aud. A.
8 p.m.--The Music School opera
will be Smetana's "The Bartered
Bride" in the Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre.

Resumes-

SUNDAY at 5:30 P.M.

The Newman Social Action Committee
Presents:
A BBC Documentary on
the War in Vietnam

hard-line Communists tightening
their governmental control. This
forecast stems from evidence that
Polish workers, who joined rebel-
lious students in the 1956 uprising,
are not aligning themselves with
the youths this time.
Allow Liberalization
But others here speculate that
the Warsaw leadership will allow
some liberalization to accommodate
the students, whose demands are
relatively limited.
Whether the current unrest in
Poland and Czechoslovakia will
spread to Communist Hungary
and East Germany depends on
whether the Warsaw and Prague
governments can solve their prob-
lems speedily, it is believed here.
Romania already has adopted a
foreign policy course independent
of Moscow, while mantaining tight
authoritarian controls at home.
Most observers here do not expect
serious internal dissent by Ro-
manian liberals.
Bulgaria and Albania
Bulgaria and pro-Peking Al-
bania, two other members of the
formerly monolithic Red bloc, are
regarded as less politically ad-
vanced . than their Communist
neighbors and unlikely to feel the
contagion of liberalization soon.
The Kremlin has so far kept out
of the Soviet press news about the
spectacular political happenings in
Czechoslovakia and Poland. And
U.S. experts have come across no
evidenceasyet of a Kremlin desire
to' intervene with troops and
tanks, as it did in 1956.
They think Moscow's leaders
would prefer to get along with the
ultimate winners in the political
struggles.

4

$1.00 members
1429 HILL STREET

$1.50 others
ALL WELCOME

I

II

Sunday, March 17 at 7:30 P.M.
NEWMAN-331 Thompson

Something from your jeweler is always something
special, and this is nevertruer than when you
select from our fine collection of precious gems and
jewelry accessories. Further, you have the
assurance of selecting from a jeweler who has
cared enough to qualify for membership in
the American Gem Society-a select organization
of only some 1000 firms in the U.S. and
Canada. Let us give you the proper information
and guidance when you are purchasing
that important gift for that important person.

Petitioning for SGC
Membership Board
Extended through March 20
(3 .Student Members)

PUEBLO INDIAN CROCKERY and Pottery Dishes -
pitchers, figures, bowls, even a bird. On a terra cotta
clay base, simple designs are painted and etched on the
surface.
A new shipment of sheepskins has arrived-they're
cuddly under your toes.
In four colors:sliqueur glasses from Korea. Four
of these slim glasses can hold your liqueur for $1.80.

I

U

.4

literary school steering committee

announces

Petitions Available
MRS. SAMUELSON

petitioning for membership
Pick up forms in 1220 Angell Hall

MEMBER AMERICAN GEM SOCIETY

Must be in by March 20th

BAYS Arcade Jewelry Shop
16 NICKELS ARCADE

Especially Interested in Both Affiliated
and Non-Affiliated Men and Women

402 MAYNARD--662-4540
Open from 9:45 till 5:30 Monday through Friday (usually)

4

k:

Enjoy Yourself - Join The Michigan Daily Today!

or

THE

MICHIGA N

ME

'S GLEE LUD

SPRING

iS

CONCERT

Saturday, March 23

Hill Aud.

8:30 P.M.

4'

From The Manila Times, Friday, June 9, 1967

"Within the Philamlife Hall last night, all was cozy cheer
as the some seventy-strong University of Michigan Glee Club
poured song after song from a wide repertory mainly dis-
tinguished by its bright American character.
"Of the college glee clubs that have come here-Harvard,
Yale, Cornell-the boys from Ann Arbor, Michigan, appear
most representatively American in their program and style.
"The men from Michigan sing a style reflectively American
-bright, positive, humorous, utilizing only a soupcon of
cnrtmtnt--nnA nhnov nal lnnnna preciselv in the nursuit

"This was most admired in the numbers sung a copella (al-
most half the program), where the unaccompanied voices
traced assigned parts with transparent clarity and diction.
"Their tone is virile but youthful, meltingly melted in a tight
but malleable discipline. And the boys were obviously picked
as much for their own American looks as for vocal talent.
"The American assertive brand of optimism was a feature
common to most numbers. Democratic ideals got its share of
the spotlight in the musical setting of portions of Carl Sand-
burg's The People, Yes.

"When the stage boomed with the varsity songs, one re-
called football weekends in the Fall, with leaves crackling
underfoot and the cold, crisp wind fluttering pennants,
scarves, and raincoats. And when the choir struck up the
Alma Mater, true-blue sons of Michigan in the audience
stood up.
"Their director, Philip A. Duey, is obviously an exacting
director to get such results. And the one distinctive thing
about him I'll always remember is his podium manner-so
unobstrusive and so unrestrained. He looked as if he just
stood there, in all his rangy six-foot frame, and drew music
from the boys through sheer force of will, without moving
his arms!

11

"American humor. irresoressible and boasting an original

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