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March 16, 1968 - Image 10

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-03-16

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Page - Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, March 16, 1968

Poge Ten THE MICHIGAN DAILY Saturday1 March 16, 1968

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BOOK SALE
9tup
Books of all kinds
WAHR'S

316 S. State

NO 2-5669

Thomas A. BaIley and the thigh school

By WALTER SHAPIRO
Democrats vs. Republicans:
The Continuing Clash, by
Thomas A. Bailey. Meredith
Press, $4.95.
Thomas A. Bailey wrote my
high school American history
textbook, The American Pa-
geant. This bulky, red book was
a good example of the genre-
amply equipped with visual
aids, soothing generalizations,
clear causal connections and a
lively narrative which effec-
tively inculcated political val-
ues.

It was this lively narrative
prose style which makes me
remember the book so vividly.
After all, how can anyone for-
get a book with sentences like,
"The men of Nippon made hay
while the rising sun shone."
Bailey, a diplomatic historian
from Stanford University, has
now applied these skills which
made him so effective in the
high schools to the task of cre-
ating an election year book os-
tensibly for an adult audience.
Implicitly fore-seeing a John-
son-Nixon electoral tilt, Bailey
has rushed into print "to show
that the differences between

the Democrats and their op-
ponents . . . have always been
substantial."
Such is the rationale for 135
pages of narrative history of
Presidential politics in this
country, which reads as if Bai-
ley had all but cribbed it from
his high school text.
There is little in the way of
substantial analysis or any at-
tempt at thematic development,
except that Bailey continually
depicts the big government-
small government dichotomy in
terms harking back to Hamili-
tion and Jefferson. For exam-
ple, Bailey generalizes, "Frank-

lin Roosevelt was fully pre-
pared to use Hamilitonian
means to achieve Jeffersonian
ends."
But in general Bailey's his-
toriography is of the inoffen-
sive, descriptive sort. However,
Bailey makes an exception for
the Radical Republicans who
obstinately refused to accept
consensual two party politics.
Bailey first brandishes the
crowning insult in his vocabu-
lary against these Reconstruc-
tion Republicans by calling
them "ultra-conservatives." He
elaborates more fully in a foot-
note, -"These Radical Republi-

Feeding the world by combing the seas

can extremists of the 'radical
right' bear certain resemblances
to the Republican Goldwater-
ites of 1964."
While all this vituperation
is undoubtedly emotionally
therapeutic for the Stanford
historian, it is exceedingly dif-
ficult to fathom his rationale
for these striking labels.
One would think rather that
the ultra-conservatives of the
1860's were those who were
trying to keep the slave system
intact in all but name and not
those who wanted to use eman-
cipation to transform the so-
cial structure of the South.
Appended onto to the narra-
tive is a short section in which
Bailey attempts to present his
case for "the virtues of the two
party system."
His argument is straight for-
ward. "Substantial differences
have always existed between the
major parties . . . Otherwise
parties woud not exist or per-
sist . . . " In short, the old ra-
tionale of simplistic political
science - what exists is good
because it exists.
Yet, despite this build-up,
the only real differences which
Bailey can perceive between the
two parties are modifications
of the old adage that the Rep-
ublicans are the party of the
For the
FICTION and NO

iangup
big business and the. Demo-
crats are for the working man.
Even if one accepts Bailey's
contention that there were and
still are significant differences
between the two parties, the
book still leaves a more fund-
amental question unanswered.
And that is whether the differ-
ences between the Democrats
and the Republicans are at all
relevant to the problems facing
the country today.
No amount of historical evi-
dence can hide the glaring real-
ity that the collapse of the lib-
eral civil rights movement has
left both parties bereft of any
solutions to the urban morass.
It is not that important that
we are in Vietnam because of
the traditional international-
ism of the Democrats or because
of the fervent anti-Communism
of the Republicans. The real
problem is that there are few
if any ideas in either party as
to how America can relinquish
its self-appointed role as the
world's great counterrevolu-
tionary power.
Bailey's big mistake with this
book was trying to write for an
adult audience. If only it were
republished in an inexpensive
edition, it could be a real best-
seller at the junior high school
level.

COUNCIL SEATS LS&A BOARD
Carol Hollenshead Larry Deitch
Michael Davis Carla Kish
Panther White Elizabeth Wissman
Gayle Rubin
Bob Nelson
Board of Intercollegiate Athletics-Phil Brown
BEST OF LUCK IN THE COMING YEAR!!
Michigan, Inter-Fratlernity Council

Congratulations to the New SGC Officers
President-MIKE KOENEKE
Vice-President-ROBERT NEFF

DINE OUT ON

By STEVE WILDSTROM

Harvest of the Sea, by John
Bardach. Harper & Row,
$6.95. .
Since the end of the 18th
century, population growth has
been a topic of heated debate
among social and biological
scientists.
After Malthus was "proved"
wrong when the food supply
held up through the early part
of the 19th century, the old no-
tion that the food supply
would more or, less keep up
with a growing population once
again came into the fore.
In recent years, it has become
clear that the earth is rapidly
approaching a human satura-
tion point. There are now some
three billion human beings in-

habiting the planet and, in the
underdeveloped areas of the
world, the number is growing
phenomenally. More scientists
today believe that drastic steps
must be taken to check this
population growth if the world
is not to plunge into subsist-
ence economy in 20 years.
There remain, however, in-
dividuals who believe that man
has always found new sources
of fodd to feed new mouths
in the past, and will continue to
do so indefinitely on into the
future. These optimists, rec-
ognizing the limited amount of
arable land available and the
diminishing returns whichre-
sult from increasing the inten-
sity of cultivation beyond a cer-
tain point, have tended to look
to the sea as the provider of

the vast quantities of resources
needed to support the growing
population.
In Harvest of the Sea, Prof.
John Bardach does much to
dispel the comfortable notion
that the sea, if only its re-
sources were tapped, could pro-
vide food, raw materials and
power for an infinitely large
number of people.
Bardach, a professor of fish-
eries in the natural resources
school and a member of the
Vice President's Council on Ma-
rine Resources and Engineer-
ing Development, quotes oce-
anographer John Ryther as
saying, "The open sea is a des-
ert compared to moderately
fertile land." There are only a
few areas on the vast expanse
of the seas, such as the con-
tinental shelf of North America
and an area of the Pacific off
the coast of Peru, where com-
mercial fisheries are economic-
ally sound.
While dismissing the oceans
as a boundless source of food,
Bardach does suggest ways in

which the "harvest of the sea"
can be improved.
After some preliminery shil-
ly-shallying by the Food and
Drug Administration, fish pro-
tein concentrate (FPC) a white,
tasteless, almost odorless pure
protein made from "garbage"
fish such as alewives, has been
ruled fit for consumption. FPC
may be a great help in supple-
menting protein-poor diets, al-
though the primary food prob-
lem of the world is not a short-
age of protein but a shortage
of calories.
Bardach, a gifted popularizer,
writes with a' bright, conver-
sational and often witty style.
He rises to eloquence when de-
ploring the mess man has made
of inland waterways and coast-
al areas by dumping wastes.
Although the bulk of the work
is taken up with semi-technical
descriptions of man attempts
at exporing and harvesting the
sea, its real virtue lies.with the
implicit caveat - like all other
resources, the sea can only be
a limited provider.

St. Pa trick's Day'

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Latest in

LAMPLIGHTER
FINE FOOD
OPEN 7 days a week
from 7:30 a.m. - 10 p.m.
Tel. 665-7003
c 421E. LibertySt.

N-FICTION BOOKS

A book-look at nature
By DANIEL OKRENT
In Wildness is the Preservation of the World, words by
H. D. Thoreau, photos by Eliot Porter. Sierra Club and Bal-
lantine Books, $3.95.
For quite a number of years, the Sierra Club has been the
nation's most active conservationist group.- Fighting for usually
good causes (notable exception: an attempt to stop the damming
of a Kentucky river that swells each spring and causes thousands
of dollars of flood damage), they mount their canpaign to pre-
serve America's natural gifts on a number of fronts. Most rec-
ognizable of these are some avid lobbying campaigns, but I think
,the most effective means of reaching the public is through a
recently heightened publication drive.
An example of Sierra's most effective on-paper arguments
can be found on the pages of this wondrous paperback volume,
photographed by an ex-physician who has become so consumed
in his devotion to nature, he manages to produce some of the
most breathtaking color pictures that I have ever seen.
The first release in what is hoped to be a long-standing
relationship with Ballantine, In Wildness is the Preservation of
the World is a "popularly-priced" copy of Sierra's original, large-
format $25 edition. In joining with Ballantine, the club is pre-
senting a true service to those who could not afford the more
expensive.
Accompanying Porter's photographs, which appear on every
lefthand page, are excerpts from Thoreau, each specifically ad-
dressed to the subject of the facing photo. Together, the visual
and the literary comprise an elegant and eloquent plea for all
of us to stop and look before we destroy.
There is no stopping short in offering a recommendation for
this book. I only suggest that you stop at a bookstore, pick up
a copy and turn to any page at random. After looking at what it
has to offer, you will feel compelled to buy it.
E- - - - - -

visit
ULICH'S
TRADE BOOK DEPARTMENT
on the 2nd floor

4' _

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Open: Mon., Wed.. and Thurs. 4 P M -2AM.
Open: Fri., Sat., Sun. Noon to 3 A.M. (Closed Tues.
DeLONG'S PIT BARBECUE
314 Detroit St. Phone 665-2266
CARRY OUT ONLY FREE DELIVERY
Bar-B-Q Beef Dinner ............$1.95
1/2 Fried Chicken........... .$1.55
Fried Shrimp .................$1.60
All Dinners include French Fries and Slaw

w

WORSHIP

I

:r r rri nrir rri

LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
National Lutheran Council
Hill St. at S. Forest Ave.
Dr. H. 0. Yoder, Pastor
SUNDAY
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Worship Services.
6:00 p.m.-Supper.
7:00 p.m. - "Trends in Modern Church
Architecture"-Dean Herbert Johe, School
of Architecture.
WEDNESDAY
7:15 p.m.-Lenten Service. "A Layman In-
terprets Christian Faith" - Dr. Gerhard
Bauer, U-M Medical School faculty.
HURON HILLS BAPTIST CHURCH
Presently meeting at the YM-YWCA
Affiliated with the Baptist General Conf.
Rev. Charles Johnson
761-6749

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Phone 662-4466
1432 Waghtenow Ave.
Ministers: Ernest T. Campbell, Malcolm G.
Brown. John W. Waser, Harold S. Horan
SUNDAY
Worship at 9:00, 10:30 a.m., and 12:00 noon.
Presbyterian Campus Center located at the
Church.
BETHLEHEM UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
423 S. Fourth Ave.
Telephone 665-6149
Pastors: E. R. Klaudt, Armin C. Bizar,
W. C. Wright,
9:30 and 10:45 a.m.-Worship Services.
9:30 and 10:45 a.m.-Church School.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State and Huron Streets
663-0589
Dr. Raymond H. Saxe, Pastor
Morning Services-8:30 and 1 1:00 a.m.
9:45 a.m.-Sundoy School and Alpha Omega
Fellowship.
6:00 o.m.-Training Hour-Classes for all
ages.
7:00 p.m.-Gospel Services.
Wednesday Prayer Meeting at 7:30 p.m.
If it's Bible, you want, come to Grace Bible-
Fundamental, Pre-Millenial, Biblical.

CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William
Rev. Terry N. Smith
Theme: Wards Around the Cross-What the
Bystanders Said: "Wait."

N THE
WATERFALL
R ES TA U hANT
Presenting PAT McCAFFREY nightly &
THE MARKSMEN Fri. & Sat. night
A For your Dancing & Dining Pleasure
2161 W. Stadium - For reservations call 662-2545

0

THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgewood
Across from Ann Arbor High
Roy V. Palmer, Minister
SUNDAY
10:00 a.m.-Bible School.
11:00 a.m.-Regular Worship.
, 6:00 p.m.-Evening Worship.

I

I I

WEDNESDAY
7:30 p.m.-Bible Study.
Transportation furnished for all
NO 2-2756.

services-Call

old
211-213 N.

h e idlber g-953

9:30 a.m.-Coffee.
9:45 a.m.-U Fellowship
11:00 a.m.-"What an
Says about His Son."
7:00 p.m.-"All Things
for What? "
8:30 p.m.-College and
and Refreshments.

Bible Discussion.
Omniscient Father
Work Together-
Careers Fellowship

'/

t UMUf UQ 0 Q
Here's one of the impor-
tant new books of 1968!

WHY THE DRAFT?
The Case for a Volunteer Army
By James C. Miller ll (Editor), David B. Johnson,
Cotton M. Lindsay, Mark V. PauIy, Joseph M.
Scolnick, Jr., Robert D. Tollison, Thomas D. Willett
With an introduction by
Senator Edward W. Brooke 25
A PENGUIN PAPERBACK ORIGINAL
WHY THE DRAFT? is a book that every thoughtful
American will want to read, consider and discuss in
this important election year.
Seven young political economists take a critical but
objective look at the draft in all its aspects and at
the alternatives to it. They conclude that conscrip-
tion in any form is inequitable and then examine in
detail the advantages and.problems of a volunteer
army.
"This is an excellent piece of work by a group of
men of sound professional training and of the rele-
vant age and concern. Policy on the draft has always
been made by the old and the aging, and never so
mnch as nnw. and by the snecialists in cliche and tra-

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
1 511 Washtenow
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
4Llfred T. Scheips, Pastor
SUNDAY
9:45 and 11:15 a.m.-Services, The Rev-
erend Richard Kapfer, "An Unclassified
Weapon."
11:15 a.m.-Bible Class.
6:00 p.m.-Gamma Delta, election of of-
ficers.
WEDNESDAY
10:00 p.m.-Midweek Lenten Service, Holy
Communion.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
SUNDAY
10:30 a.m.-Worship Services. Sunday School
(2-20 years).
WEDNESDAY
8:00 p m.-Testimony Meeting.
Infants room available Sunday and Wednes-
day.
Public Reading Room, 306 E. Liberty St.-
Mon. 10-9, Tues.-Sat. 10-5, Closed Sun-
days and Holidays.
"The Bible Speaks to You," Radio WAAM
1600, Sunday, 8-00 a.m.
For transportation call 663-7321

PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST
Southern Baptist Convention
1131 Church St.
761-0441
Rev. Tom Bloxam

CHURCH

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH AND
WESLEY FOUNDATION
At State and Huron Streets
Phone 662-4536
Hoover Rupert, Minister
Eugene Ransom, Campus Minister
Bartlett Beavin, Associate Campus Minister
SUNDAY
9:00 and 11:15 a.m.-Worship Services. Dr.
Rupert: "The Perils of Emotional Ath-
e ism."
6:00 p.m.-Chapel Meditations.
6:15 p.m.-Fellowship Supper, Pine Room.
7:00 p.m. - Fellowship Program, Wesley
Lounge. "Conservative Christian Theol-
ogy," Rev, Ward Wilson.
TUESDAY
1 2:00 noon-Discussion Class, Pine Room. "A
Christian Perspective on Black Power."
Lunch 25c.
WEDNESDAY
8:00 a.m.-Holy Communion, Chapel, fol-
lowed by breakfast in Pine Room. Out in
time for 9:00 a.m. classes.
6:00 p.m.-Wesley Grads, Pine Room. Din-
ner and program. "The Problems of South
Africa," Miss Gail Marlon.
FRIDAY
6:00 p.m. - Young Marrieds, Pine Room.
Dinner and program. "Development of
Folk Music," Mr. Herb David.

i1

ii

11

IL

I

Specializing in German and American Food
Complete Facilities for Meetings, Parties, and Banquets
WOIA Live Radio Broadcast
Every Sunday 12:30-4:00 P.M.
Serving Complete -Dinners 11 a.m.-2 a.m.
City ParkingLot fn rear of Restaurant
Closed Mondays

9:45 a.m.-Sunday School.
S11:00 a.m.-Morning Worship.
6:30 p.m.-Training Union.
7:30 p.m.-Evening Worship.
ST. AIDEN'S EPISCOPAL CHAPEL
(North Campus)
1679 Broadway
9:00 a.m.-Morning Prayer and Holy Com-
munion.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
1236 Washtenaw
Donald Postemo, Minister
10:00 a.m.-Morning Worship Service. Ser-
mon: "Word of Affection."
7:00 p.m.-Evening Worship Service. Ser-
mon: "What Do I Do?"
8:15 p.m.-Discussion-Dr. Alfred G. Mey-

I.b TheXod 9ox
Located in Scenic Northern Ann Arbor Area (Dixboro)
BES~T SEILECTION OF SEAFOOD IN ANN ARBOR AREA
"the fish you eat today played yesterday in Gluucester Bay"
OT HER SPECIA LTI ES

ALDERSGATE STUDENT
FELLOWSHIP and THE ANN ARBOR
FREE METHODIST CHURCH
1700 Newport Road
David E. Jefford, Pastor
9:45 a.m.-Discussion.
7:00 p.m.-Vespers.
__l .4 .0..

FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
n -,1 A .L. , . . .

1I

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