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March 15, 1968 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-03-15

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Friday, March 15, 1 9680

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Five

Friday, March 15, 1968THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Pace Five

ENTERS MORE PRIMARIES:

McCarthy Opposes RFK Election Bid,

I
i

Second Film in the TRUFFAUT SERIES:
"Shoot the Piano Player"
Saturday, March 16 at 8:00 P.M.

Says Entr
WASHINGTON (FP) - Sen. Eu-
gene J. McCarthy displayed a
marked coolness yesterday toward
a possible presidential bid by Sen.
Robert F. Kennedy and said that
it might split opponents of the
Vietnam war and help renominate
President Johnson.
McCarthy said he expects Ken-
nedy to enter the Democratic
presidential race within days.
"It would make it a little less
likely that we would have strength
on the first ballot," he said.
McCarthy said his supporters
are standing firm behind him and
he showed his determination to
stay in, the race by announcing
he will run in two more presi-
dential primaries, in Indiana on
May '7 and South Dakota on
June 4.
Assessing
Kennedy refused to add any-
thing to his announcement that
he is reassessing the situation.
"'m not -having anything further
to say," he told reporters outside
his office.
Aides to the New York Demo-
crat have said he will reach his
decision by a week from Friday,
which is the deadline for with-
drawal from the May 28 Oregon
primary.
The aides had also indicated
Kennedy might enter other pri-
maries, if he decides to run, but
McCarthy moved quickly to get
into these races ahead of the New
York Democrat.

y May Spli
In announcing he will enter the
Indiana and South Dakota pri-
maries, McCarthy said he is do-
ing so because "neither President
Johnson nor Richard M. Nixon,
now the leading Republican can-,
didate, offer Americans a real
choice or a real alternative."
"'The issues, therefore, must be
raised in as many primary elec-
tions as possible to ensure that as
many voters as possible can ex-
press their wish as to the future
course of America," he said.
McCarthy said Wednesday he
thought a Kennedy candidacy,
based on approximately the same
platform as his, might confuse
matters. He was asked by report-
ers yesterday if he thought Ken-
nedy's entry would split the peace
movement. "I think it would," he
replied.
He was then asked if he
thought Johnson's chances of re-
nomination would be enhanced by
a Kennedy candidacy. He shook
his head and repeated, "I think
it would."
McCarthy spent yesterday in
Washington before leaving early
today for Wisconsin, and his bat-
tle against Johnson in that state's
April 2 primary.
Presidential advisers, were re-
ported genuinely concerned that
McCarthy might win that race,'
and McCarthy said he expects to
win. An informed source said
Johnson's supporters would junk

it Anti-War Vote

the pledge cards and the adver-
tisepents saying "Hanoi Is
Watching" anti-Johnson votes
for the Wisconsin contest.
Both were used in New Hamp-
shire, where McCarthy polled 42
per cent of the Democratic vote
and won 20 of 24 convention dele-
gates.
McCarthy was asked, both by
reporters and by students wheth-
er he would withdraw from the
race in favor of Kennedy.

"It's hard for me to persuade
people -- I think they like a cred-
ibility gap," McCarthy told the
students. "I have said at least 20
times - I don't have in mind a
drop-out."
He said he had conferred by
phone with many of his support-
ers and they assured him they
were standing firm. "They have
no intention of yielding any
ground," he said. "The flags are
all flying today."

ONLY 75c

NEWMAN-331 Thompson

THOMPSON'S PIZZA-

I

Student Lawyers Help Poor
In Asserting Legal Rights

Rash on Gold Threatens
World Finance Stability

By STEVE ANZALONE
"I'm surprised that someone is
on my side," comments one of
over 300 indigents who have bene-
fitted from the counsel of a stu-
dent-lawyer from the Washtenaw
Legal Aid Clinic.
Others expressed satisfaction
that their student-lawyers pre-
ferred to help them assert their
legal rights rather than try and
solve their family problems.
The legal aid clinic provides law
students with the chance to gain
actual courtroom experience while
offering to indigent litigants legal
counsel they might not otherwise
have enjoyed.
The clinic, which operates un-
der the local Community Action
Program of the Office of Econ-
omic Opportunity, has some 90
second and third year law stu-
dents acting as counsel under the
direction of attorney George
Stewart, the clinic director.
The last quarter of 1967 saw
316 new cases opened up by the
clinic. Family matters are the
usual issue - divorce, custody of
children and legal support are the
most common. They might also
deal with legal contracts, bank-
ruptcy,, or eviction cases.
Who may benefit from the
service is determined by income
and income-related c r I t e r i a.
There is a standard income cut-
off, with allowances\made for
number of dependents, health,
age, and debts.
The requirements for students
to serve in the clinic are only that
they be in their second or third

(Continued from Page 1)
Department transferred $450- mil-
lion in gold from its money stock
to the special fund in New York
from which actual sales are made.
Much of this is expected to go
to _the London pool.
The action by the Federal Re-
serve and the Senate in approving
the gold cover bill serve to back
up with deeds the U.S. commit-
ment to maintain the gold price.
World Bank
George Wood, the president of
the World Bank, attending a
White House dinner last night,
told reporters "It's a bona fide
crisis." Asked if he thinks the
dollar is in any danger, Wood
said "of course it is."
The last time Britain closed its
banks and financial institutions
without notice was Monday, Nov.
20, 1967, because of devaluation
of the pound to $2.40 from $2.80
the previous Saturday night. That
move was to forestall chaos in
money markets..
A Treasury spokesman said the
banks will be closed today to all
business except for meeting cus-
* tomers' cash needs in pounds
sterling.
The Queen's proclamation fol-
lowed a Privy Council meeting at
Buckingham Palace with Prime
w ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to offi-
cially recognized and registered student
organizations only, Forms are available-
in room 1011 SAB.
Southern Asia Club; bag lunch Fri-
day noon in the Commons Room of
Lane' Hall. Mr. Carroll Shaw of the
U.S. AID Mission will speak on "Prob-
lems of Management in Indonesia."
All delegates to the Mock Convention
are invited to stop by the Reagan Hos-
pitality Suite and find out about Gov.
Reagan's ideas. Room 3C Union, Fri.
and Sat., March 15 & 16, 7-10 p.m.
Michigan Christian Fellowship, Fri.,
March 15, 7:30 p.m. in the UGLI Mul-
tipurpose Room, Speaker: Dr. Walter
Kaiser, "Christianity: Intellectual Sui-
cide?"
Baha'i Student Group, informal dis-
cussion, "A New Race of Men," Fri.,
March 15, 8:00 p.m., 520 N. Ashley. All
welcome. Call 662-3548 if you need
transportation.

Minister Harold Wilson, Chancel-
lor of the Exchequer Roy Jenkins
and Economics Affairs Secretary
Pete Shore.
Political sources said Britain
acted in response to a message
from President Johnson late last.
night on the emergency hot line
connecting the White House with
No. 10 Downing Street, the prime
minister's residence.
Details of Johnson's reported
message were not available, but
informed sources said U.S. author-
ties asked the British to close their
gold market, biggest in the world,
to forestall ftther disorder.

year and have a 2.0 academic av-
erage.
Students are not normally al-
lowed to practice in courts with-
out a degree, but a 1965 Supreme
Court Michigan ruling, Rule 921,
permits second and third year
students to defend the poor at the
discretion of local courts.
Jackson County courts permit
students to practice unaccompan-
ied, but courts in Washtenaw
County require the students to
practice only under the direction
of an attorney. Stewart most oft-
en does that, although two more
lawyers are being hired.
Stewart says the students are
doing an effective job. "They suf-
fer naturally from lack of exper-
ience, but work well because oi
the time and interest they are
willing to devote to their cases."
University Charter
Caledonian Airways
FLY TO
LON DON
from'
DETROIT
$230 Roundtrip
May 20 to Aug. 19
Also, Wait Lists For:
May9to June 19
June 27 to Aug. 22
CALL: 761-2348
5-7 P.M.

announces
CHICKEN DINNERS
-Free Delivery-
HALFACHICKEN, FRENCH FRIES
ROLL and HONEY-$1.75
761-0001
CINEMA' 11
announces
PahETITIONING FOR
MEMBERSHIP i
Sign up for Interviews
by 5 P.M., March 21 in
SGC Offices - S.A.B.
(NTERVIEWS MARCH 19-21)
or call 764-7631 or 769-3585

The RESISTANCE
sponsors a
WORKSHOP ON PRISONS
with DAN LINDN ER, co-working at Milan Prison
Saturday, March 16, 1968-Noon
GUILD HOUSE
S802 Monroe
MARkKS
COFFEE HOUSE
605 E. WILLIAM, ANN ARBOR
specializing in fine sandwiches and
pastries-exotic coffees
PRESENTS:
Matthew MISHAKOFF-Guitar, Mandolin
Jerry WILLARD--Guitar
Joel LIPTON-Viola
playing Vivaldi, Villo Lobos, Bartok
FRIDAY, MARCH 15
THE STELMAJO
STRING QUARTET
playing Mozart, Haydn, Beethoven
SATURDAY and SUNDAY, MARCH 16 and 17

Performances at 8:30-9:45-1 1:00
$1.50 admission for entertainment
OPEN DAILY 9:00 A.M.-12:00 A.M.
NO CHARGE DURING REGULAR HOURS

Subscribe to The Michigan Daily
ICINEMA GUILD VTH FORUM

1421 Hill St.
TON IGHT at 8:30 P.M.
PETER BOWEN-
singing blues, folk, and folk-rock music
--playing 6 and 12 string guitar
SATURDAY-
( EAST AND WEST-
(a folk-duo from Detroit) singing religious, topical, and
contemporary folk music-playing guitdr instrumentals.
$1.00 cover includes entertainment and refreshments!
THURSDAY and FRIDAY
THE LONG
VOYAGE HOME
Directed by John Ford, 1940
JOHN WARD
WAYNE BOND
Based on O'Neill's Caribbean plays
7:00 & 9:05 P.M. ARCHITECTURE
AUDITORIUM
b

I

JOHN

MICA LEFF

SINGER AND SONG WRITER

I

PIRBURY iOUSB
330 MAYNARD

II

TONITE and
SATURDAY

$1.50 per person
8 P.M. '.00after 2nd set
"WHY NOT" -- Dayton Allen

Monday, March 18 700 & 9:00

VTH FORUM

$1.50

I

11

CATHOLIC VOICE

CINEMA GUILD VTH FORUM
Apologies from Godard, his agent, France and Cinema
Guild, but Godard has become very ill and returned to
France yesterday, cancelling the restof his American tour
JEAN-LUC GODARD
LECTURE CANCELLED

LECTURE SERIES PRESENTS

PETITIONS FOR
GENERAL CO-CHAIRMEN
OF THE '69

UNION-LEAGUE

La Chinoise will be shown Monday, March 18,
7:00 & 9:00 P.M. at the Vth FORUM.

CREATIVE ARTS FESTIVAL

GREGORY

ONE NIGHT ONLY.
Sponsored by Cinema Guild

BAUM

Tickets at the Door Monday Night at $1.50.
Lecture Refunds will be made at Vth Forum &
Cinema Guild.

11

Available in the

SORRY!

UAC Offices

2nd floor, Michigan Union

Problems of Faith Today
Father Gregory Baum, O.S.A., writes and lectures frequently on
tkshnn'a, nA rumtnicm PAirnt er ntth I Inivrci, jof rihnur'un,

TICKETS:

purchase through Saturday at Centicore
Books. S. University

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