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March 14, 1968 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-03-14

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Thursday, March 14, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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STUDENTS EXPRESS SOLIDARITY:
Poles Protest in Nine Cities;
Government Blames 'Zionists'

Kennedy
President

Reassessing
ial Chances

WARSAW (i)-Antigovernment
student demonstrations spread
from the capital to eight Polish
cities yesterday.
Police in Poznan, the steel city
that rioted in 1956, reportedly-were
flailing at several thousand march-
ers with clubs.
Anti-Semitism
PAP, the Polish press agency,
carried the text of a resolution
issued by Foreign Trade Ministry
workers saying: "We demand that
our authorities stop tolerating the
activities of the reactionary Zionist
elements in the political, economic,
cultural and social life of the
country."
Tuesday the government fired
three officials, believed to be Jews,
whose children were accused in
the press of leading the riots.
Israel Sympathizers
Blame was also directed at stu-
dent members of a Jewish club
which was accused of being "known
,for its manifestations of joy in
connection with Israeli, successes
during its aggression against the
Arab countries."
Some Western observers believe
the unrest will be used by the re-
gime of Wladyslaw Gomulka to
purge Jews from important posi-
tions. Many have been accused of
refusing to go along with the gov-
ernment's condemnation of Israel.
Informants told of demonstra-
tions in seven other cities.
Their aim was to express soli-
darity with students at the Uni-
versity of Warsaw who fought po-
lice for three days during demon-

strations against the closing of a
popular play that might prove em-
barrassing to the Russians.
Reliable sources said the police
in Poznan waded into lines of stu-
dents chanting "the press lies"
and burning copies of state con-
trolled newspapers in front .of a
statue of Adam Mickiewicz, the
19th century Polish poet whose
play "Dzaidy" was ordered off the
stage in January.

The students charge that "the
press lies" seemed to be directed
at the government's attempt to
blame the unrest on hooligans and
"Zionists." This line was stressed
again yesterday.
In Cracow, authorities were said
to have used force in dispersing a
parade of some 3,000 marchers at
Jagiellonian University, Poland's
oldest institution for higher educa-
tion.

WASHINGTON (A)-Sen. Robert Kennedy said he has not con- quite clear from his testimony
F. Kennedy said yesterday that ferred with McCarthy, who polled we're going to move in Vietnam
as a result of the New Hampshire i 43-per cent of the New Hampshire in the same direction we have
primary "I am reassessing my po- vote, except to congratulate him been heading."
sition as to whether I'll run on his showing. Kennedy's decision is expected
against President Johnson" for Kennedy also said the testimony to come by March 22, the dead-
the Democratic presidential nom- earlier this week by Secretary of line for deciding whether to leave
ination. State Dean Rusk before the Sen- his name on the Oregon primary
"I think that the election in ate Foreign Relations Committee ballot or remove it with a dis-
New Hampshire has indicated a|was a factor in his reassessment. claimer that he is not and does
good deal of concern in the Dem.| Although he called Rusk's tes- not plan to become a candidate
ocratic party about the direction timony brilliant, he said, "It is for president.

Czechs Pledge Loyalty;
Soviet Bloc Still Dubious

our country is going," Kennedy
told reporters.
Strong Showing
In the New Hampshire Demo-
cratic presidential primary, Sen.
Eugene J. McCarthy (D-Minn.)
made a strong showing after a
campaign based on criticism of
America's course in the Vietnam

McCarthy's

Showing

Indicative of Dissent

PRAGUE () - Czechoslvakia's
leaders are trying to reassure their
Soviet bloc partners they will not
abandon them for a more Western
oriented stance regardless of the
current drive toward liberal re-
form at home, informed Com-
munist sources said yesterday.
But, the sources said, the loyalty
pledge has not so far dispelled
distrust among Czechoslovakia's
allies toward the process the party
calls "Socialist democratization."
"Except for Yugoslavia, news-
papers in the other Socialist coun-
tries do not print a word about
our free discussion -here," said
one party informant.
"These people remain. highly
suspicious of what we are doing
here."
With press censorship all but
lifted, there have been various
calls for a more independent

Czechoslovak role in world pol-
itics.
Yugoslavia's nonaligned position
was mentioned and there have
been suggestions for cQmplete neu-
trality.
Rumors revolved around a new
foreign policy path that might
be outlined in the party's action
program which the Central Com-
mittee will discuss later this
month.I
But a party expert said: "It is
not even clear whether foreign
policy will be mentioned in the1
program of action. If it is, it will
just stress our close ties with the
Soviet Union."
Asked whether Czechoslovakia
might be considered an independ-
ent stand like Romania, he re-'
plied: "What have they gained
by this idiotic position?"
The source did not exclude at-
tempts to improve relations with
the West, however, and mentioned
coordinating efforts for closer ties
with the Common Market.
The source also said any great-
er flexibility in foreign politics
was not likely to ihclude such
steps as restoring relations with
Israel.,
There was no foreseeable pros-
pects either of diplomatic ties
with West Germany unless the
Bonn government thoroughly re-
vised its attitude of nonrecogni-
tion toward East Germany, he
added.

-Associated Press
SENATOR ROBERT F. KENNEDY told reporters in Washing-
ton that he was "reassessing" his position as to whether or not
he'll run against President Johnson for the presidential nomin-
ation.
NEAR PANIC:
London ol ealers'
Restrict Buying Rush
TCNDT N (A)_ L d Tb A,. 1-.ll .m fnt-.,

war. CONCORD, N.H. () - Sen.
Kennedy said in January he had Eugene McCarthy's strong show-
told friends and associates he ing in the New Hampshire Demo-
would not oppose Johnson under cratic primary foretold the diffi-
any foreseeable circumstances. culties President Johnson may
Kennedy said his reassessment face in an expected bid for re-
is also based on evidence the election.
Johnson administration plans to It also prompted a reassess-
keep on its present course in Viet- ment by Sen. Robert F. Kennedy
nam, which Kennedy has criti- (D-N.Y.) of his own chances for
cized, and that "Richard Nixon is the nomination.
very likely to be the nominee of
the Republican party," McCarthy was emboldened to
ul paty hope that he might dethrone
All Options Johnson because of the clear pro-
Aides indicated Kennedy's re- test of New Hampshire voters
assessment would include all pos- against White House policies.
sible options, icluding wheth~er
to abandon his neutral status and The Minnesota Democrat's op-
back McCarthy if he decides timism was based on Johnson's
against making the race himself, failure to muster even half of the
McCarthy commented to re- more than 54,000 Democratic votes
porters that they ought to ask in the nation's first presidential
Kennedy what he means. popularity contest of the 1968
----------- ---- campaign.
In Washington, Kennedy told
Plate Handlers reporters outside a Senate hearing
room that "I am reassessing my
P lposition as to whether I'll run
Strike Papers against President Johnson for the
Democratic presidential nomina-
DETROIT (P)-The number of tion."

t

'F' IU-) ---- Uon on Duion
dealers clamped sharp restrictions
on sales yesterday as Europe's
gold buying rush .neared panic
proportions.

quote a price Jor that metal in a
move similar to that of London
gold dealers. The Paris price for
silver had already soared 20 points
by then.

U

W NNER
7 ACADEMY
AWARD
NOMi NATIONS!1
" BEST PICTURE
" BEST ACTOR DUSTIN HOFFMAN
0 BEST ACTRESS ANNE BANCROFT
SPHELEVINE " BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
MIKE NICHOLS KATHERINE ROSS
LAWRENCE TURMAN. \ * BEST DIRECTOR
MIKE NICHOLS
9BEST SCREEN
\ PLAY
' "*BEST
. TGCINEMA-
/I TOGRAPHY
THE
GRADUATE

The dealers' efforts to slow In London, gold dealers added
the gold rush and give them a full five cents onto the price at
time to catch up on what was de- W e d n e s d a y morning's fixing,
scribed as a vast backlog of or- making it $35.20 an ounce, and
ders did not appear wholly suc- still the demand continued. They
cessful. refused to accept new requests
Demand in all European bullion for small orders but continued
markets continued at a stampede selling large amounts to regular
level throughout the day. Specu- customers.
lators and hoarders snatched up Spokesmen emphasized t h e
the metal at almost any price in move was not a suspension of
the drive to get out of paper sales.j
money. "We are applying a brake, so
Paris silver dealers refused to to speak," said one.

I

IU

MEM

1

unions on strike against the De-
troit News and Detroit Free Press
increased Tuesday as Paper and
Plate Handlers Local 10 struck
both papers.
The International Typographi-
cal Union and Pressmen's Union
previously struck both papers.
The Teamsters Union and Pho-
toengravers Union also are on
strike against the News.
Teamsters at the News are vot-
ing on an amended offer, with
results due to be tabulated Fri-
day by the State Labor Mediation
Board.

The heavy turnout of about
106,000 Republicans in New
Hampshire, who gave Nixon 79
per cent support at the polls in
a virtually uncontested election,
gave striking indication that Re-
publicans are sensing that John-
son is in political trouble and
may be vulnerable in November.
Kennedy clearly sensed the
same thing. But McCarthy showed
no inclination now to let Kennedy
push him aside and claim the
torch of dissent within the Demo-
cratic party.
Few political strategists were

saying that because Johnson won
over McCarthy by a scant 3,527
votes, the party is likely to dump
the President.
Johnson got 48 per cent of the
vote, McCarthy 42.
But they were saying that the
22,810 votes McCarthy racked up
against Johnson's 26,337 indicates
substantial dissent among Demo-
crats to the way the President is
conducting not only the Vietnam
war but the Presidency itself.
M cC a r th y 's headquarters in
Washington was claiming that the
Minnesota senator actually got
more votes than Johnson.
They contend that there were
4,640 write-ins for him on the
Republican ballot, where they
said Johnson got none. That
write-in vote will not be known
for at least a week.
35Africans
Wein Pardon.
In Rhodesia
SALISBURY (M) - Rhodesia's
white minority government said
~yesterday it has reprieved 35, of
113 black Africans sentenced to
death by.hanging.
The reprieves followed the ex-
ecution Monday and last week of
five Africans, the first put to
death since Rhodesia unilaterally
declared itself independent of
Britain in November 1965.: The
five were convicted of murder.
There was worldwide condem-
nation of the execution and at-
tempts to organize U.N. Security
Council action against Rhodesia.
Appeals for clemency came from
all over the world, including one
from Pope Paul.
Among the reprieved were four
Africans, convicted of grenade
attacks and setting buildings on
fire, who were to have been put
to death Monday.
Five other Africans also were
reprieved Monday. The govern-
ment said 85 cases were at a stage
where they could be reviewed and
of those 47 in all had been re-
prieved. It included in these fig-
ures three men whose death sen-
tences were commuted last year.
The Rhodesian government had
previously hung five black Afri-
cans in spite of their receiving re-
prieves from QueenElizabeth II.
The executions heightened the,
pressure on Prime Minister Har-
old Wilson to use force against
Rhodesia. So far Wilson has in-
dicated that he does not plan to

I

J EAN-LUC

GODARD

MONDAY, MARCH 18
PROGRAM NO. 1:
6:30 P.M.-$1.50
Godard's latest film-
Ann Arbor premiere of
LA CHINOISE
(in French with subtitles)
PROGRAM NO. 2:
8:30 P.M.--$2.25
In English-Godard himself
speaking, followed by a
showing of LA CHINOISE
Vth FORUM Theatre
* Tickets available at Centicore
Bookstore, Vth Forum Theatre,
Discount Records (on State St.)
and at Cinema Guild (6:30-9:15
only evenings). Reserved tickets
must be picked up at Cinema
Guild. Sponsored by Cinema Guild.
Godard comes to Ann Arbor.as
part of his month long U.S. tour.

Departnent of Speech .
in Co-operation with
The Department of English
p rCesei /
UN IVERSITY PLAYERS
A Dark Comedy of DISSENT
-Winner of the 1967 Hopwood Award
Wednesday-Saturday
March 13-16
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
Box Office open Daily at 12:30 P.M.
Prices: , $1.25 and $1.50
All performainces at 8:00 P.M. Sharp!

THURSDAY and FRIDAY
THE LONG
VOYAGE HOME
Directed by John Ford, 1940
JOHN WARD
WAYNE BOND
Based on. O'Neill's Caribbean plays
7:00 & 9:05 P.M. ARCHITECTURE

ANN1E ANCROFL..DUSTIN HOFFMAN- KATHARINE ROSS
CALDER WILLINGHAMNBUCK HENRY PAUL SIMON
91MOGARFUNKEL I ENCE TURMAN
W11IEe NICHOLS IECHNICOL.OR PANAVISION'
MN EMBASSY PICTUVRS NELAU
NATIONAL GENERAL CORPORATION
6TH FOX EASTERN THEATRES M
WEEK FO.PL LL6E 00 & 9
375 No. MAPLE RD. "769.1300

C rs.
):00

FR I. 7:00-9:00-11:00 SAT. 3:00-5:00-7:00-9:00-1 1:00
FR.70-:01 SUN. 1:00-3:00-5:00-7:00-9:00

I

I

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mi

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0

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM
PRESENTS
TWO MUSICAL HITS!
TICKETS ON SALE NOW

1O ACADEMY
AWARD
NOMI NATIONS!

" ".Y . J.. 4 ..tttt.::"t"5:4".1Ji~i1J . ..1 .................... .. .. . . . . . . ..
.5""M.rr.....r...t{:.....r ...................v....n........... ..c r.*...1............. . . . ..... . . . . . . . . . . . . .. '::'J: :1 t:'
EDWARD DAVID C.
EARLE JOIES
00
!M WRIT BROAM AYo0
LEStLIEIRICUSSE-ANTMBONY NWKLY ┬░0
MUSICAL┬░
00
r4E ROAR DOROTHY
OFF9E LAMOUR
GREASEPAIIT
GOWER CHAION

acA O DADI TOR I UM use force. Instead ne nopes tna
( ~stiffer economic sanctions will
bring Rhodesia in line.
T THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
GILBERT & SULLIVAN SOCIETY
presents
PRINCESS IDA
March 27, 28, 29, 30
Wednesday, Thursday Performances . . $2.00
Friday, Saturday Performances ........ ...$2.50
Saturday Matinee ............. $1.50
Tickets on sale 9:00 to 5:00, March 18 and 19 in the Fishbowl.
BL OCK S A L E S
THIS THURSDAY & FRIDAY io F
Between the hours of 8 A.M. & 4 P.M.
THE MICHIGAN MEN'S GLEE CLUB

UIAAV
)IJLAIWM

w L

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PRESENTS:
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