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March 13, 1968 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-03-13

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Wednesday, March 13, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Pace T hree

THE MICHIGAN DAILY PnE~e Thr~

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STUDENTS' FATHERS:
Three Polish Officials Fired
In Wake Of Demonstrations

Gold Price Backing
Hits World Markets

Congress Fails in Bid

For

Voice on

Vietnam

WARSAW, Poland WP - Three Iren have been attacked in the state

officials of the Polish Communist
reglie were fired yesterday after
their children, students, took. part
in three days of riotous demon-
strations.
The official Polish news agency
PAP announced the dismissal of

controlled press as ringleaders of
demonstrations.
The newspaper Kurier Polski
said the organizers of the distur-
bances, which have rocked War-
saw since Friday, were members
of the so called "Babel Club" con-

swept to the doorstep of Commun-
ist party headquarters Monday. It
said of 300 persons arrested, 30
were students.
However, there was still dis-
content in the city's colleges and
universities, where students at
meetings discussed their displeas-

LONDON, (P) - Gold specula-
tors stepped up their raids on
Europe's markets yesterday and
economists said only "concrete
measures" by the United States
will stem the steady drain threat-
ening the world monetary sytstem.
Meanwhile, in Washington the
United States backed up its stated
determination to maintain the
price of gold at $35 an ounce by

the drain on Ft. Knox has amount-
ed about $1 billion a quarter.
One cynical London dealer said
of Washington's transfer of gold
to the exchange stabilization fund:
"That won't last long at the pres-
ent level of sales."
Fourth Shift ,
This was the fourth shift of
gold from the money stock to the
Exchange Stabilization Fund since
devaluation of the British pound!
on Nov. 18 and it raised the total
to $1.475 billion.
The Treasury Department acted
as the Senate opened debate on

Jan Grudzinski, vice minister of , nected with the Polish Jewish ure with the Communist author-
forestry and timber; Jan Gorecki, Society. ities for their handling of threeI
director general of the Finance! The newspaper also blamed sev- days of disturbances.
Ministry, and Fryderyk Topolski, eral Polish writers, saying they in- Speakers at the meetings de-
in charge of a Warsaw industrial dulged in hostile, "Zionist propa- nmanded the release of arrested
planning office. ganda." lecturers and students. They also
The report did not say why the An official account blamed 'hool- disclaimed association with "hool-!
men were fired. But their child- igan elements" for rioting that igans."
-- - The first student demonstration
- - -- Friday was against the expulsion:
of two colleagues arrested for tak-
TON I T E! TON I TE ! ing part in a protest action against
Itheforced closing of a play.
There also is anger about press
BBC umn tary F maccounts which variously label
oc e 3r I students and their organizers as
on the anarchists, hooligans and Zionists
Eworking for an Israeli-West Ger-,
WVman alliance.
at ' *SATYY II
i rym7 py [px7T Vnf-7rot' INC.

I

making an additional $450 mil-
lion in gold immediately available
to back the dollar abroad.
Special Fund
It transferred that amount ofj

gold from the nation's money stock a House passed bill to make the
to a special fund in New York nation's entire gold stockpile --
where sales of gold are actually now less than $12 billion for the
made to foreign governments, first time since 1937-available to
Gold sales were heavy in Frank- defend the dollar by removing the
furt, Rome and Brussels and gold cover.
reached a 1968 high in Paris. Under law, each $1 in Federal
In London, by far the biggest Reserve notes, the only paper
I money now made, must be backed
center for gold dealings, demand; t~ ;~

was building apparently toward an
end of week peak.
Close to 100 tons was believed
drawn off in dealings in Europe
Tuesday from the monetary re-
serves of the Western banking
nations.
The United States fills 59 per
cent of the needs of the seven-
nation international gold pool.
Since devaluation of the Britishk
pound Nov. 18 and the start of
the first of recent gold rushes,

Dy 25 cents in gold - a require-
ment that ties up more than $10
billion of the total supply.
Treasury officials hope the bill
will be approved quickly and sent
to the White House to help calm
the continued heavy speculative
gold buying in Europe.
U.S. officials insist the United
States and six other nations which
make up the London gold pool
can weather the spree. Total gold
reserve of the seven nations is
about $24 billion.

52 minutes

BOOTS 0 LEATHER
CUSTOM + UNUSUAL
CLOTHING
215 S. State, 2nd floor

WASHINGTON P)--Sen. J. W.
Fulbright failed yesterday to win
a clear administration promise to
consult his Foreign Relations
Committee before deciding wheth-
er to send more U.S. troops to
Vietnam.
"If more troops are needed,
Secretary of State Dean Rusk told
the committee, "we will-as we
have done in the past-consult
with appropriate members of Con-
gress."
With that, the two day nation-
ally televised and broadcast Rusk-
Fulbright confrontation ended.
Although the Arkansas Democrat
told a newsman he was not satis-
fied withCRusk's answer on con-
sulting Congress,' he appeared
publicly togaccept Rusk's promise
to appear in closed session with
the committee to expand on his
limited public explanation on the
administration's Vietnam policy.
Never Answered
"He never did answer us," Ful-
bright told newsmen later. "He
didn't say positively he would, and
he didn't say positively he
wouldn't."
Asked whether Rusk's testimony
had altered his opposition to Pres-
ident Johnson's course in Vietnam,
Fulbright said, "it was confirmed
my worst fears."
The testimony-totaling about
101 hours over two days-pro-
iuced no announced changes of
minds or policy on either side.
Rusk repeatedly told the com-
mittee he couldn't get too speci-
fic about the war in such a public
forum.
He said the United States will
adhere to its present policy and
stick out the war until an accept-
able peace can be negotiated with
North Vietnam.
But Rusk said he can offer the
committee no present hope that
Hanoi is intperested. 4
"We have no reason to believe,"
he said, "that they will not con-
tinue military operations full
scale.
Decision-Making
But the key question that dom-
inated the hearings-congressional'
involvement in future decision-
making on the course of the war
-went unanswered.
Sen. Joseph S. Clark (D-Okla),
said he has "reluctantly come to
the conclusion that it is more
and more likely the decision will

LI. '

FRE E 8 p.m.

I

SAVE THE DATE TDAY !
Friday, March 15 at 7:15 P.M.

THIS WEEK at
THURSDAY -
ST. PATRICK'S DAY
FOLK-IN
with Jack Quine, Barry O'Niel, and others -
singing traditional Irish Folk music (ditties,
ballads, and fun songs) come -- sing-a-long
and celebrate St. Patrick's Day with us!
FRIDAY -
PETER BOWEN

1421 Hill St.
8:30 P.M.

NAOMI

-Associated Press
Dean Rusk Under Questioning

FRANKLIN

singing blues, folk, and folk-rock music
playing 6 and 12 string guitar
SATURDAY -
EAST and WEST
(a Folk-duo from Detroit) singing religious, topical, and
contemporary folk music - playing guitar instrumentals.

shortly be made to send more
troops-and that we on this com-
mittee are more and more likely
to read about it in the news-
paper."
On .the other side of the Cap-
itol, meanwhile, Rep. Paul Find-
ley (R-IlD, announced that more
than one fourth of the House
had agreed to support a resolution
calling for an immediate study of
U.S. policy in Southeast Asia.
Findley said there is a strong,
substantial and bipartisan feeling
in the House that no decision to
commit large numbers of addi-
tional troops to Vietnam, nor any
other fundamental decision on war
policy, should be made until and
unless there is serious consultation
with and action by the Congress."
There have been reports the ad-
ministration is considering dis-
patching up to 206,000 additional
troops to Vietnam. Rusk told.the

"A JEWISH NEGRO LOOKS
AT NEGRO-JEWISH RELATIONS"

Why would a black person want the extra burden of being Jewish? Naomi
Franklin says Judaism is all she has ever known. She grew up as a Jew.
Naomi attended Yeshiva, went to Israel, and has a profound interest in
Judaica. She has dedicated her energies to helping her fellow Negro Jew.
Reactor Panel and Discussion Leaders

JOSEPH BEN-DAK and
DAVID R. SEGAL
Center for Conflict Resolution
JOHN HARTMAN
Psychology

MR. & MRS. JOHN MACKADU
Friends Center

S-PU-Resista nce
invites you to a coffee hour discussion:
CANADA
IMMIGRATION & INFORMATION
Wednesdays-8 P.M.
RESISTANCE & NON-COOPERATION
Thursdays-8 P.M.

Senate committee no decision has
been made-and that the admin-
istration is under taking a broad
review of its policies in the wake
of the Communists' big city of-
fensive over the Vietnamese New
Year.
Fulbright, demanding a con-
gressional role in deciding the
future course of the war, told
Rusk the conflict is "at a crucial
turning point."
"What I want to talk about,"
he said, "is the exact, precise
plans you have on escalation .. .
I believe we could make a con-
tribution if we were given a
chance to do so."
Thedwar, Fulbright said, has
reached a point where new deci-
sions will determine "whether we
either go down the road to all
out war or to a negotiated solu-
tion."
Rusk-who frequently warned
the committee that U.S. allies
and adversaries around the world
were listening to every word of
the public hearing, said the sec-
retary of state "didn't come down
in the Korean War for public
hearings, talking about military
operations going on in the face of
the enemy."
WHAT'S)
Y OUR, .
HANG UP

LUTHER WEEMS
Psychology

DR. & MRS. ALBERT WHEELER
NAACP
(Others to be Announced)

UNIVERSITY PLAYERS
Department of Speech
in Co-operation with
The Department of English
Jes e i t

1429 Hill Street

663-4129

All Welcome

WORKSHOP ON PRISONS
Saturday, March 16-Noon
with Dan Lindner

11

GUILD HOUSE (basement) 802 Monroe

A Dark Comedy of DISSENT
-Winner of the 1967 Hopwood Award

I AVE

STARTS TOMORROW
Thursday-7:00 and 9:15
Fri. - Sat.-3-5-7-9:15-11:20

THE RESISTANCE
802 Monroe
662-0582
7.30-11 P.M.

THE RESISTANCE
307 S. Division
761-1264
3-9 P.M.

Wednesday-Saturday
March 13-16

Blondes ?
Brew?
Bread ?

ONE OF THE MOST HIGHLY ACCLAIMED
FILMS IN RECENT YEARS!!

I

i

Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
Box Office open Daily at 12:30 P.M.
Prices: $1.25 and $1.50
All performances at 8:00 P.M. Sharp!

F--c r-t

There
to

must be more
life ..

B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation
Canterbury House
Interfaith Council for Peace
Newman Social Action Committee
Vietnam Summer
Women's International League for
Peace and Freedom
and others invite you to
*

Consider:
Career as Priest or Brother
For information write:
Box 4559-MU,
Wash., D.C. 20017

!i

BLOCK SALES
THIS THURS. and FRI.

j

6onerence

(Hill Auditorium
Box Office)

on,

Between the hours of 8 a.m. and 4 p.m.

Conscience & Genocide
What is man's responsibility to conscience and his
fellow man in view of genocide and extermination?
presenting the films:
LET MY PEOPLE GO

The Michigan Men's Glee Club

PRESENTS

SPRING
CONCERT

and

':;.
:: k
/
a(: .
} ....
jf,

THE WAR GAME

Followed with discussions led by Professor Ernst
Fontheim, Professor Philip Elving, Dr. Herman

HltN1N OFI1Eti MOUNTJIW '4q- .JAA ju.'ni'L' Uin rI m UIPJ'Iiu U

I

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