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March 12, 1968 - Image 9

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-03-12

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Page Nine

Tuesday, March 12, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

The Salt Mind

Gymnastics

Dispute

Draws

to

... by Rob

Saltzstein

*

*

*

*

*

*

W Today and tomorrow is election day on this campus. There
are many students who will not vote. This article is intended
only for those who will cast ballots. If you do not intend to vote
then don't bother to read this for there is no sense in wasting
your time.
Innocently tucked away on a separate ballot today,
somewhat obscured from the big wigs who are making their
bid for eternal political fame, is a slot entitled, "Student
Representative to the Board in Control of Intercollegiate
Athletics." There are two candidates running for this posi-
tion: (1) Phil Brown; (2) Joe Jones. Both are sophomores
and both are well qualified-unfortunately only one can win.
Until 1964 an athlete always was elected to the post. But
that year Tom Weinberg, a Daily staffer, beat out Cazzie Russell
for the position. Rick Volk, a football player, won again in
1965 but in ,the last two years Daily men have again been elected
to the post.
Despite his great ability as a football player (he eventually
became a Michigan All-America and last year he was a rookie
star on the Baltimore Colts) Volk was not an effective member
of the board. He cut at least a third of the meetings and showed
a lackidaisal interest that was quite a contrast to his perform-
ance on the gridiron.
This does not reflect on Jones. All evidence seems to indicate
that he is a serious and intelligent candidate and if elected there
is no reason to think that he will not do a good job.
But that is not really the question here. The question
is: should an athlete be allowed to sit on a board that makes
decisions directly concerning himself? If the interest of ob-
jectivity can he possibly, in all fairness, be allowed to do
this? Clearly the answer is a resounding "no."
Coaches are not' allowed to have a voice on the board for
essentially the board passes judgement on their policy, conduct,
and results. To no lesser degree it also passes judgment on the
athletes themselves.
Thus, by the same logic, is it also not a conflict of in1terest to
aut an athlete on the board also?
The student representative has an equal vote on the 17
man board with the other board members. His job is, to the
best of his abilities, to represent the students on the board.
He is not there to represent any one segment' of a group. Phil
Brown is running as an independent, it happens to be that he
is a member of the Daily but he is not running because of it.
When Cazzie lost in 1964 I was upset. I had the feeling that
people had voted against him because he was an athlete. Not
electing Cazzie because he was an athlete was the height of
unfairness, or so I thought.
But I didn't know then what I know about the job now. It's
just because he is an athlete that one should not be elected.
Discrimination you claim. Right, and absolutely so, but in this
case it is required.
An athlete, has no more business on the Board in Control
of Intercollegiate Athletics then the parents of the accused
sitting on the jury that tries their son. Ojectivity requires
this.
An athlete is very close to the issues involved and that is
fine, but in this case he is so close that objectivity becomes im-
possible. And objectivity is, after all, what is most required here.
How can an athlete be expected for example, to render an ob-
jective opinion about his coach should that ever become neces-
sary? The very nature of the athlete, whatever his qualifications
be, makes his position untenable for this job.
It so happens that both Phil Brown and Joe Jones possess
outstanding qualifications. In his two years on the Daily, Brown
has shown that he can meet deadlines and accept responsibility.
Football has taught Joe Jones these sape lessons. But an athlete
is an athlete is an athlete, and in this situation it must be taken
into account in the name of objectivity.
In East Quad last night a memograph paper hung on
the wall that said in blue lettets. Don't vote for the Daily
candidate."
How really absurd. Phil Brown is not a Daily candidate; he is
running as an independent and concerned student. He is not
interested in winning on a wave of emotion; he wishes to win
with reason and intelligence.
Reason and intelligence requires his election.

Bulls Clip Royals,10498

By The Associated Press
CHICAGO - The Chicago
Bulls, getting a basket and two
free throws from Flynn Robinson
in the final minute of play, edged
the Cincinnati Royals 104-98 in
a National Basketball Association
game last night.
Cincinnati's Oscar Robertson,
hitting 37 points including 13 in
the final quarter, was not enough
to overcome the balanced scoring
effort of the Bulls.
* *. *
THE GRAPEFR UITers
LAKELAND, Fla. - Jim North-
rup arid Eddie Mathews each
drove in three runs as the Detroit
Tigers raked Dick Farrell for
eight runs in the first two innings
and went on to defeat the Phila-
delphia Phillies 9-5 in an exhibi-
tion baseball game yesterday.

1
. 1
3
a
i
1
I 1
r
t
I "
I

Mathews slammed a bases- tors outslugged the New York'
loaded double in the six-run first, Yankees 11-7 in an exhibition

and catcher Jim Price added a
two-run triple. Northrup singled
home a run in the first and drove
in two more in the second with a
double.
WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. -'
Sonny Jackson and Mike Lum
raced home with the winning : unsI
on an error last night as Atlanta
whipped Minnesota, 6-4, in an
exhibition baseball game.
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -
Mike Epstein cracked a three-run
homer in an eight-run second
inning as the Washington Send-I

game yesterday.
WINTER HAVEN. Fla. - The
Boston Red Sox and St. Louis
Cardinals took turns whacking
home runs yesterday, but it was
a little infield hit by Orlando Ce-
peda which drove in the winning
run as the Cardinals won 6-5 in
10 innings.
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla, - Pat
Harris walked Jerry Morales on a
3-2 pitch in the 11th inning yes-
terday, forcing in the winning'
run as the New York Mets edged
the Houston Astros 4-3.

Pro Standings
NHL
East Division

Montreal
New York
Boston
Chicago
Toronto
Detroit

w
37
33
33
30
27
23

L
18
20
23
21
28
31

T Pts
10 84
12 78
10 76
15 75
9 63
10 56

GF
206
199
236
193
174
212
152
177
153
163
164
139

GA
139
163
196
187
155
221
158
206
161
201
188
193

West Division
Philadelphia 27 28 10 64
Los Angeles 28 31 6 62
St. Louis 24 27 13 61
Minnesota 24 ;28 13 61
Pittsburgh 22 30 12 56
Oakland 15 38 14 44

SPORTS BULLETS:
Puck Tourney Nears
DULUTH - The NCAA Hockey Tournament opens Thursday
with defending champion Cornell a slight favorite to repeat. The Big
Red will represent the East along with Boston College, while WCHA
champion Denver and third-place North Dakota hold the Western
berths.
Denver defeated Minnesota 7-3 and North Dakota slipped past
Michigan Tech 3-2 in the final WCHA playoffs over the weekend
to insure places in the tourney.
(Denver (26-5-1) meets Boston College (19-9-1) in one semi-
final game Thursday night, while Cornell (26-1-0) takes on North
Dakota (19-9-3) Friday night. The winners will play for the cham-
pionship Saturday night.
* * *
HOUSTON - The Houston Mavericks claimed Elvin Hayes
of Houston in a secret American Basketball Association draft at
Louisville, Kentucky, over the weekend. The league gave Houston
first chance at Hayes and the Kentucky Colonels first chance at
Westley'Unseld of Louisville. Houston general manager Slater Mar-
tin said the meeting was held in secret so the teams could begin
negotiating with some of their choices. When contacted, Hayes said,
"It doesn't change anything. Everyone knew they would get the
rights to me."
* * *
NEW YORK - Detroit Piston basketball star Dave Bing has the
NBA scoring race all but wrapped up, ,with a total-of 1,987 points
through 73 games. His nearest competitor; Elgin Baylor of the Los
Angeles Lakers, is 125 points behind.
* * *
LOUISVILLE - The number of college basketball stars who will
pass up their chance to make the U.S. Olympic team has grown
to five. Wesley Unseld, two-time All-American from Louisville said
yesterday that he was "weary" from playing and would not take
part in Olympic trials later this month in Indianapolis, Ind.

By ANDY BARBAS
The recent National Collegiate
Athletic Association (NCAA) de-
cision to allow only one of the
three Big Ten gymnastics co-
champions to participate in the
n a t i o n a 1 championships has
caused a fierce debate among the
schools.
Representatives from Michigan,
Michigan State, and Iowa will
meet today with Big Ten CQm-
missioner Bill Reed in an effort
to decide which of the three is
entitled to represent the confer-
ence in the championships. sched-
uled for April 4-6 in Tucson, Ari-
zona.
Michigan State feels that ac-l
cording to NCAA rules it is -
titled to represent the Big Ten.
Michigan and Iowa both support,
the opinion that all three engage
in a playoff to determine the e 3-
trant.
It All Began
The problem originated with a
rule change this year by thej
NCAA. Under the new rules,
the following conference
meets shall be qualifying meets
for the University Division Cham-
pionships . . ." The rules then
list the Big Ten Conference as
one of these conferences.
In the Big Ten, however, the1
championship is based equallyon
the conference meet and dual;
meet results. This year, the r'e-
sults after the dual meet competi-
tion were: Iowa first, Michigan;
second, and Michigan State third.,
In the conference meet, the fin-
ishing order was reversed with
the Spartans in the lead. When
the total between the two areas
was compiled, the result was a
tie between all three teams.
At this point, the three coaches
thought that all three schools
were entitled to compete in the
NCAA championships.
Missed Rule
They were later informed by
Walter Byers, executive secretary
of the NCAA, that they had over-
looked one rule. It stated, "The
meets designated in Rule 1, Sec-

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tion 2, Article 1 'this is the rule
referred to above) shall qualify1
one team to the National Colle-
giate Championships."
Because of the new develop-
ment, the'Big Ten, in its annual
meeting last week, voted to have
a run-off meet to determine the
representative,
Michigan State, however, in-
formed the Big Ten Conference
yesterday that it was entitled to
be the representative to theI
championships. It, in turn, cited
another clause which read, "The
team score earned on the second
day (of the conference meet)
shall determine the qualified tearn
for the National Collegiate Cham-
pionship."
When informed of this, the
coaches from Michigan and Iowa
wondered what the Big Ten rules
had to say about the matter. They
found that the gymnastics
coaches had considered a resolu-
tion during their September meet-
ing. It stated "that the Big Ten
follow NCAA rules to determine
our conference team champion "
The vote on the motion was

Head
three in favor, four against, and
one abstention. This meant that
the motion was defeated and im-
plied that the NCAA rules would
not apply.
Further investigation revealed
a motion passed the year before
determining the conference cham-
pion by counting the conference
meet and dual meets on an equal
basis.
Newt Loken, Michigan's coach,
noted, "Under NCAA rules, the
conference can designate a meth-
od of determining its representa-
tive different from the NCAA's
method.
Sam Bailie,. Iowa's coach,car-
ried Michigan State's reasonirg to
absurdity. "If Michigan State had
won the Big Ten meet and we
had placed second, we would have
won the Big Ten Championship.
Yet if we accepted the NCAA
rule, Michigan State would be the
representative school."
George Szypula, M i c h ig a n
State's coach, felt, "This whole
thing is too much up in the air
to comment on until a final de-
cision has been reached."

Yesterday's Results
No games scheduled
Today's Games
Detroit at Los Angeles
NBA
Eastern Division

Philadelphia
xBoston
New York
.Detroit
Cincinnati
Baltimore

w
57
50
38
36
36
35

L
18
26
38
40
42
41

Be-
Pet hind
.760 -
.658 712
.500 191/
.474 211Y.
.462 22%/
.461 221/2

Western Division
St. Louis 55 25 .688 -
Los Angeles 47 29 .618 6t
San Francisco 43 34 .558 101,
Chicago 26 49 .347 26i%
xneattle 21 54 .280 31Y2
San Diego 15 63 .192 39
x-Late game not included.
Monday's Results
Unicago 104, Cincinnati 98
Boston at Seattle, Inc.
Tuesday's Games
Chicago vs. Philadelphia at New
York
Baltimore at New York
Seattle at Detroit
Boston vs. San Francisco at Oak-

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