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March 10, 1968 - Image 9

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-03-10

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Sunday, March 10, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

pe Nm I~s

PAID ADVERTISEMENT

agewine
PAID ADVERTISEMENT

C

CT

S

Presidential

Positions

* *

S

Voters To Decide

Stated

New Pres.,

V.P.

Ballot Includes Nine
Council Candidates .
Three tickets for president and vice-president and nine coun-
cil candidates provide the focus of attention in SGC elections Tues-
day and Wednesday.
A 'Choice 68" also ballot allows students to vote their preference
for President of the United States, and to take stands on the issues
of Vietnam and the urban crisis.
In addition, sixty-three candidates are running for a Univer-
sity-wide Constitutional Convention, to revise the SGC constitution.
Michael Koeneke, '69 BAd, Mark Schreiber, '69 Econ, and Pan-
ther White, '68, all are running for president of SGC. Their running
mates, respectively, are Bob Neff, '69, Andrew Quinn, '69, and Shelly
Mittleman, '68. Schreiber and Koeneke and Quinn are incumbents,

Michael Koenke Bob Neff
Four Terms on Council SGC Treasurer

Mark Schreiber
Chairman, Student Rental Union

Andrew Quinn
Equal Opportunities Program

Panther White
Exec. Comm., City Course

Shelly Mittleman
UAC Outreach Committee

i+
Y

Academics is the area of University life most directly affecting stu- (1) student-to-student recruitment of urban ghetto and low-income There have been many questions among the thinking students
dents. We :are committed to pushing for the quickest possible imple- prospects by University students from communities surrounding Ann today about the actual quality of the undergraduate University of
mentation of the following academic reforms: Arbor. Michigan, To correct for what I think is a general failing of the
A. Student voice in determining faculty tenure. (2) creation of an Urban Studies Center to initiate and co-ordinate University's teaching capacity, I support and suggest:
B. Student voice in determining curriculum. inner-city action projects, and conduct concurrent research. 1) Tutorial reading courses offered in all departments. These are
C. A revision of the pass-fail system. (3) expansion of the Inner City Course program, to involve both presently offered in the Psych., Soc., and Math. departments.
1. Make "D's" as pass University students and ghetto residents, extension into suburban 2) Seminars-Groups of students could sign up for the above courses
2. Apply pass-fail option to language and distribution requirements. I areas. and form these seminars. 3) More experimental courses such as the
3. Allow freshmen and sophomores to use the option Academic City Course and the Residential College's Freshman seminars. 4) Oral
D. Establish an appeals board for students who feel they have been (1) students to be selected with a voting position on all major de- examinations to be given in smaller courses. 5) Letter grades are de-
given a grossly unjust grade. partmental committees-curriculum, hiring, tenure, etc. humanizing. Why not substitute in written individual instructor evab
E. Set up a department for Interdepartmental Studies (2) Course mart-to generate and execute ideas for non-traditional uations Instructors would be forced to have personal contact with
F. Reinstitute a "Free University" on this campus. academic offerings. students. 6) Ad hoc review of "publish or perish" criteria to place
We propose the organization of student unions at the departmental (3) interdisciplinary studies program - where overlapping courses emphasis onto teaching rather than publishing. 7) Abolishment of
level to work for these changes, could be formed, and students could major in policy areas, the mandatory language requirement. 8) Students holding seats on
Housing. The movement for an eight-month lease must con- Housing all bodies of academic decision-making on the department, college,
tinue, to be followed by a campaign for lower rents. The University (1), tenant unions to be formed by apartment residents to collectively and university level. 9) Work-Study rotation of semesters, similar to
must be persuaded to push acceptance of its eight month lease more bargain with management agencies or directly with owner, on serv- programs.at Bennington and Antioch. Such a program now exists on
strongly among Ann Arbor landlords, and must be pressured to begin ices, rents and eight-month leases. the Dearborn Campus for engineers; why not bring this to the Cen-
providing low cost private housing for students. .Also, if SGC becomes (2) University and SGC undertake leasing of existing apartments tral Campus and why limit this to engineers. 10) Field experiences
incorporated, it will be in a position to look into building low cost from owners. We manage the buildings instead of the agencies which such as Outreach in the Psychology department should be extended
housing itself take 8-10 percent of the gross revenue. to other departments. eg. ghetto work for Sociology.
Consumers Welfare is an issue that SGC has talked about for a (3) application for federal funds, by an incorporated SGC, to con- The Student Government Council has been found lacking in
long time; but which has seen little activity. We are ready to end this struct student housing. unity and efficacy as of late. To correct this, I support: 1) SGC spon-
inactivity, and bring about some real progress in this area. Just as (4) a Housing Planning Board, comprised of students, city officials, soring a coordinating committee to the Graduate Assembly to com-
with apartments, students can wield considerable pressure against U faculty, and landlords to determine the future distribution and bine the interests and actions of the two. 2) Incorporation of SGC.
Ann Arbor merchants if organized effectively. type of housing throughout the city. This would enable SGC to legally own property, operate stores, invest,
SGC can also work to bring services to students such as the current Incorporation etc. 3) Unionization of the students. A union is formed when a group
attempt to get 'reduced laundry rates by working with a business (1) contact with the Ann Arbor Cooperative Society to obtain mass of people ban together to protect their common rights. All students
from outside Ann Arbor. discounts at drugstores, gas stations, etc. would be free to join this union.
Parking and Driving. SGC must convince the administration (2) increased allocation of student fees to SGC, decided by student The eight-month lease looks imminent. Landlords are raising
to set aside about 1000 parking spaces for students, selling parking referenda. the rents as high as 25 percent which ameliorates the purpose of the
permites on a priority system determined by the distance the student (3) establishment of cooperative book, clothing, and food stores. reform. I suggest: 1) University built huosing on its land on North
lives from campus. These permits would be in effect from 8 to 5 on "Graduate nationalism' Campus to give the students low-cost 8-month housing of a quality
weekdays. Otherwise, any student should be permitted to operate an Recognition of the differences in identification and differences at least commensurate of those on campus and adequate transporta-
automobile at night and on weekends. in age, family status and educational concerns, must be made through tion to classrooms. 2) More renewed and strengthened boycotts on
In short, we are talking in terms of specific issues and activity. We are provision in the formal student government structure for the right of individual realty firms. 3) Incorporated SGC investing in real estate
extremely concerned about more over-riding issues such as the draft self-government by graduate and professional students. by students on a co-operative basis. 4) Extension of apartment privi-
and classified research, but are convinced that before meaningful Classified Research leges to Sophomore women which would free several Residence Halls
activity with strong student support can be exercised in these areas, Student opinion in the upcoming referendum must be for conversion into apartments.
SGC must legitimize itself by confronting everyday student issues. heeded by the University administration. Students must be appointed In addition to the above, I exhort all students to honor Draft
We see this as the only practical means of achieving a strong student to those committees which make decisions on classified research and Deliberation Day on the 19th of March and to vote against classified
government with serious student backing. IDA membership. research on the referendum on the election ballot,.
Reerenda CHOICE '68
To Evaluate .a.e
'U Research '&Si Vi1 s Wa GiCiies on

and Neff is SGC treasurer.
Panhel, IFC
Donate time
To Election1
Poll workers for each pollingt
station in Tuesday and Wednes-
day's SGC election are being sup-r
plied in the main by workers from2
Panhellenic Council and Inter-
Fraternity oCuncil. Panhel is sup-
plying a n unprecedented 300X
workers, whileIFC is offering ap-
proximately 250. Many of the in-
dividual dorm pollsnare being
manned by volunteers from with-a
in the particular dorms.
At most stations, polls will ber
open from 8 o'clock in the morn- t
ing until 6 o'clock at night. No
See Related Con-Con I
Story, leftt
~-- I
ballots will be counted until the t
second night of elections is over, a
when all votes will be tallied. s
Each student voting will receives
three ballots. The first will covero
candidates for executive offices I
and council seats, the athletic and 1
publications boards, and literary a
and engineering school officers. t
The second ballot will be provi- s
ded to enable voting for the Con-
stitutional Convention. Students P
will be able to vote an entire slate p
in by merely checking one box, If
or they may cross vote tickets as o
well as independent candidates.
The third ballot will be the s
Choice 68 selection of U.S.bPresi-
dential candidates, with three re-
ferenda on Vietnam and the cities. d

Two incumbents are also rung
ning to keep their seats, Carol
Hollenshead, '71, Gail Rubin, '70.
Two SGC vice-presidents are also
running for posts, Michael Davis,
administrative vice - president,
Grad. and Coordinating vice-pre-
sident Paul Milgrom, '70.
SGC personnel director Bob
Nelson, '71, Mark Madoff, '70, and,
White and Mittleman running,
again as candidates for councils
complete the list.
This is the second election in a,
row that a two-day period has
been set aside for elections. "It
worked so well last semester that1
we decided to make it standard
practice," said SGC Elections Di-.
rector Ken Kelley, '71. "It makes
allowances for bad weather and,
increasesthe number of students
apt to vote."
The election will include two
referenda on the University posi-
tion in classified war research.
One asks if the University should
withdraw from the Institute for
Defense Analysis, a group of 12
universities which provides the
Defense Department with scien-
tific studies in national security,
and the other asks if the Univer-
sity should cease all classified re-
search.
Seats for the Board in Control
of Student Publications, the Board
n Control of ;Intercollegiate Ath-
etics, the presidency of the liter-
ary and engineering schools, and
he vice-president of the literary
chool are also on the ballot.
Students will have ample op-
portunity to vote, with 17 polling
laces stationed on campus. In
last year's presidential election,,
over 11,000 students voted:
University Activities Center Is.
ponsoring a "Think-In" along
with SGC Elections Committee
or tomorrow night, at which the
hree presidential candidates will .
ebate in the Union Ballroom the
lections issues. The discussion
will be chaired by former UAC
?resident Donald Tucker, '68
The Think-In should stimulate
lot of student interest in the
lection, as well as provide a good
pportunity for students to heair
;e candidates;" said .Tucker.
.Major campaign iss~ues center
tround. classified' research, stu-
tent housing and the 8-month
ease, the possible formation of
t student union, and incorpora-
ion of SGC.
The Choice 68 'ballot includes
he names of Nelson Rockefeller,
Richard Nixon and Ronald Rea-
an, as well as peace candidate
Eugene McCarthy, Robert Ken-
zedy and President Johnson.
The issue of U.S. action in Viet-
am also appears, with alterna-
ives ranging from increased esca-
ation of the war effort to total
'.S. withdrawal. Solutions from
ncreased government spending to
olve the urban crisis to toughen-
ng local law enforcement units 'as
4 way of eliminating the problem
re listed, with two alternatives
n between.

BaIi

Two referenda asking the Uni-
versity to end classified research A unique feature has been add-
and withdraw from the Institute ed to this semester's SGC election
for Defense Analyses will be on to give students who otherwise
the ballot in the Student Govern- have no way of expressing their
ment Council elections this Tues- views about their choice for Pre-

Immediate withdrawal of U.S.
forces.
Phased reduction of U.S. military
forces.
Maintain current level of U.S.
military activity.
"All Out" American military
effort.
Then regarding U.S. military

action toward bombing North Vi-
etnam:
Permanent cessation of bombing.
Temporary suspension of bombing
Maintain current level of bomb-
ing.
Intensify bombing.
Use of nuclear weapons.
The last section of the ballot is

devoted to government alterna-
tives in helping cities. It asks
which should be the highest pri-
ority measure in governmental
spending:,
Education, housi'ng, income sub-
sidy, job training and employment
opportunities, orriot control and
stricter law enforcement.

Harris says he became interest-
ed in the idea of letting students
express their views in an election
because 71 percent of college stu-'
dents in the United States are
under 21, and thus have no place
to have theiir votes recorded.
Harris was able to interest Time
Magazine enough in his project

day and Wednesday. sident of the United States on
The first referendum reads, ballot a chance to do so.
"Shall the University cease all Officially named Choice 68, th
classified research?", while the ballot is being distributed at mor
second asks "Shall the University than 200 campuses across th
cease being a=member of the In- country at a general election Apri
stitute for Defense Analysis?" 24.
Student concern with these "But since Michigan is having
questions 'results largely from the its own elections at the same time
report issued in January by a it will be the first major Univer-
faculty committee headed by Prof. sity in the U.S. to vote on our bal-
Robert C. Elderfield of the chem- lot," said Bob Harris, former stu-
istry department. The report re- dent body president of Michigan
commended the University not State University in 1965 and ori-
accept research projects "the spe- ginator of the Choice 68 idea
cific purpose of which is to des- "And r because Michigan's such a
troy ilfe or to incapacitate human large school, it will naturally in-
beings."' dicate s o m e very significant
The University has been a cor- trends."
porate member of the Institute The ballot also will record stu
for Defense Analysis since 1959. dent opinion on the course the
It is a 12-university consortium United States should take in Viet-
which provides the Department nam, and on the action the gov-
of Defense with scientific studies ernment should take to confront
in national security. Former} Pre- the urban crisis.
sident Harlan Hatcher had been residential candidates are a
the University's representative on follos:dnilcnidtsaea
IDA, but new President Robben flos
Fleming has indicated he would Fred Halstead-Socialist Worker
not feel qualified to serve on the Mark O. Hatfield-Republican
panel' Lyndon B. Johnson-Democrat
There has been increasing stu- Robert F. Kennedy-Democrat
dent sentiment demanding that Martin L. King-Independent
the University withdraw from Eugene J. McCarthy-Democrat
IDA, after the path set by the Richard Nix on-Republican
Univerityifuof Chiaao Chi I Charles H. Percy-Repbulican

a
e
e
e
'1
e,
-
t-
n
a.
:t
t

that its editors agreed to finance
Choice' 68, and play up its final
results in a special issue. Harris
also hopes to edit a nationwide
television program from the
trends indicated when all the
votes are counted, "probably
sometime in May."
"It's important that this type
of election take place," he said,,
"so that all the students - not
just the well-publicized activists,
will have an opportunity to ex-
press their views."
SGC President Bruce Kahn,
who did the grouridwork to get
Choice 68 as part of the SGC elec-
tion, said "the universities at the
present time are the main centers
of dissent, and it is extremely im-
portant that the dissenters be
given a forum to make their views
known."
Indeed, the momentum of stu-
dent dissent has led many observ-
ers to believe the student vote will
be anti-administration. In a
meeting Feb. 12 with the group's
board of directors, President
Johnson called the group's idea
"highly significant." During the
interview that lasted over an hour
and a half, the President talked
about a variety of topics, includ-
ing dissenters.
"I feel sorry for them, because
I think I know how they feel," he
said.
Speculation is that Rockefeller

POLLING
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EAST QUAD
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DIAG
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