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March 10, 1968 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-03-10

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Sunday, March 10, 1968
Typog
Union
Strike
To Join I
Detroit N
DETROIT (A
JONIMITCHELL tional Tyidgrap
E E 401-16 Fridayn
singer and song-writer idled Detroit
Free Press as th
Sunday $1.75 per person charged the put
8:00 p.m. $1.25 after 2nd set ed to negotiate.
Also Friday,
officials began
employes who
about terms for
Officials of
330 Maynard 372 agreed toa
ment with theI
NEXT WEEK: JOHN HAMMOND Friday, when t
items were adde
Fringe

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

. _ _ ..
i

r

GUILD HOUSE
802 Monroe
MONDAY, March 1 1 - Noon Luncheon, 25c,
PROF. TOM MAYER:
"The American Dilemma,
the Third World Within"
TUESDAY, March 12
NOON SYMPOSIUM, LUNCH 25c
BERT ROCKMAN, Political Sociology
"Factors Leading to Formation
of Indigenous Parties"

Details of thi
not made public
the News, closed
strike in mid-N
did not increas
offer.
Last month,
bers at the N
contract propos
a week in wages
fits over threey
Teamsters at
however, voted i
last month. The
pended publical
in support of t
after the Team
News.
Picketin
William J. Cro
the ITU local, sa
begin striking' t
on Monday.
ITU pickets
with some othe
carrying signs
been locked out
Croteau said
ing a week ago
and the publish
ers refused tot
lems or their o

rapher
Sets
Date
Free Press,
ews Walkout
) - The Interna-
phical Union voted
ight to strike the
News and Detroit
he union president
blishers have faif-
Teamsters Union
informing their
work for the News
a new contract.
Teamsters Local
a tentative settle-
Detroit News early
two non-economic
ed to the contract.
Benefits
he additions werej
c, but officials for'
d by the Teamsters
ovember, said they
e the last money
Teamsters mem-
ews rejected the
al calling for $30
s and fringe bene-
years.
tthe Free Press,
to accept the offer
ie Free -Press sus-
tion in November
he News, two days
msters struck the
ng Monday
oteau, president of
aid the union may
he two newspapers
recently joined
r craft unions n
saying they had
t by both unions.
at the last meet-.
between the ITU
ers, the "publish-
discuss our prob-
wn problems."

U.S. Marines at Khe Sanh, outnumbered by surrounding North Vietnamese troops, have dug trenches
and fortified bunkers for protection against mortar fire. Yesterday U.S. bombers conducted further
saturation raids around the post-and captured enemy troops off guard south of Da Nang.
NEGATIVE TAX:
New Commission To Study
Need for Guaranteed Income

--Associated Press

MARINE FORTIFICATIONS

Johnson, Nixon
Headed for Win
In N. H. Primary

CONCORD, N.H. ()-There's a
hint of political risk for Lyndon
B. Johnson in the chilly New
England air as New Hampshire
prepares to send the first trickle
of ballots into the stream of voice
that will choose a' president.
The Democratic President and
Republican Richard M. Nixon vir-
tually are guaranteed of running
first on their party ballots in
Tuesday's season opening presi-
dential primary.
The question for both men: By
how much?
Sen. Eugene J. McCarthy of
Minnesota ischallenging John-
son's renomination.
King Less Optimistic
And the President's chief pro-
moter, Gov. John W. King, ap-
pears less certain as the polling
hours near that McCarthy's Viet-
nam peace candidacy will be
buried beneath write invotes for
Johnson, whose name isn't on
the ballot.
King now forecasts a Johnson
margin of 3 to 1 over McCarthy,
with 40,000 to 45,000 Democratic
ballots expected. Two months
ago, he was talking in 10 to 1
figures.
McCarthy Campaignl
David C. Hoeh, chairman of
the McCarthy organization in New
Hampshire, said he couldn't guess
the outcome-but feels his candi-
date is progressing.
"If it comes out somewhere in
the 30 per cent area, great. Any
thing over 20 to 25 per cent

I

WASHINGTON (JP) - A new
presidential commission has set
up shop to explore whether, how
and when every American should
be provided with a guaranteed in-
come.
The idea was propelled into the
spotlight by last Saturday's report
of the National Commission on
Civil Disorders. It urged that a
federal system of "income sup-
plementation" be made available
to all needy persons.
On the same day President
Johnson's Commission on Income
Maintenance Programs held its
first meeting, unannounced. It
named Robert Harris, economist
and former IBM Corp. official, as
executive director. It directed him
to form a staff and go to work.
The guaranteed income idea
was generally considered radical
or visionary until big .city riots
and looting spurred the search

for solutions to slum tensions and
distress. Recently, it has gained
a m e a s u r e of respectability
through the endorsements of re-
search groups and some busi-
ness leaders.
However there was little ur-
gency in Johnson's Jan. 2 an-
nouncement of the new bipartisan
commission, headed by Ben W.
Heineman, board chairman of the
Chicago and Northwestern Rail-
road.
The President gave Heineman's
commission two years to report,
and some advocates of income
guarantees grumbled that John-
son was simply stalling off a
decision.
Heineman was unavailable for
comment. Harris assured an in-
terviewer that delay is not in the
mind of the commission or its
chairman - that Heineman is
"taking this assignment very ser-

it
t
i
s
.

iously." But the vast scope of the
research, Harris said, will require
18 months to two years to com-
plete.
Harris said he hopes to recruit
staff rapidly from among the
growing number of scholars inter-
ested in guaranteed income pro-
posals. Much work will be con-
tracted to universities and foun-
dations, he said.

would be substantial," Hoeh said
about McCarthy's share of the
vote.
On the Republican side, Nixon
needs a smashing turnout to
build a winner's image and pro-
pel his campaign for the GOP
presidential domination. He is
without a. major rival on the bal-
lot, but there is the looming, ab-
sent figure of New York Gov. Nel-
son A. Rockefeller.
Still not an announced candi-
date, but increasingly available,
Rockefeller is the object of a late
blooming write in effort.
Gold Price
Speculation
Increuasing
WASHINGTON (A)-The non-
Communist- world has suffered an
acute attack of the financial jitters
ever since Britain devalued the
pound Nov. 18.
A new' surge of speculative gold
buying in Europe this week is the
latest symptom of this nervousness.
It reflects an attempt to get
aboard the gold bandwagon should
the price change or paper money
tumble.
Frederick L. Deming, under sec-
retary of the Treasury for mone-
tary affairs, said any belief that
the price of gold might be changed
is absurd.
A speculator must be prepared
to spend money for storage and
insurance charges on an invest-
ment which pays no interest.
There was growing speculation
in Europe that the United States
would be unable to hold the gold
price at $35 an ounce.
But after the London market
closed Friday the-Treasury's Dem-
ing reiterated the U.S. position to
maintain the $35 price.
Officials in Washington, from
the White House to the Treasury
Department, have restated this
position repeatedly the last 10

Sweden Backs Recall
Of American Envoy

!I

----"- ail

2:15 P.M.
SUNDAY, March 10, Brasley Lounge, Hillel, 1429 Hill St.
Rabbi Zalman Schachter
MYSTICAL EXPERIENCE IN THE TIME OF THE
DEATH OF GOD
"Can Eastern or Drug Methods Work for Western Man?":
Rabbi Schachter, Chairman, Dept. of Judiac Studies, Prof. of Psych. and
Religion, University of Manitoba, Winnepeg, Canada, an authority on Hasid-
ism, has lectured widely on Jewish Mysticism, its place in the history and
life of western man, and the relationship between traditional forms and
methods of mystical experience and drug experience.

i

LA SOCIEDAD HISPANICA
LOS OIVIDADOS
(THE YOUNG and THE DAMNED)
SPANISH - ENGLISH SUBTITLES
Wednesday, March 13, 8:00 P.M.
Auditorium A, Angell Hall, 75c

/

Office of Religious Affairs

2282 S.A.B.

. _
i
ii

STOCKHOLM (A) - Prime
Minister Tage Erlander, reacting
to Washington's recall of Ambas-
sador William Heath, said Satur-
day he felt "it was fine" that a
Swedish cabinet minister marched
in an. anti-American demonstra-
tion along side North Vietnam's
envoy to Moscow.
The incident, compounding the
strain created by Sweden's open
door policy for U.S. Army desert-
ers and a threat on Heath's life,
led Friday to his recall. He is to
return home Tuesday for what
the State Department said was a
review of all aspects of U.S.
Swedish relations.
Erlander went on the Swedish
national radio to state his sup-
port for Olof Patme, the minister
of education and ecclesiastical
affairs whose participation in a
pro-Viet Cong parade'last month
was described as "highly inap-
propriate" by the American Em-
bassy.
"It is fine that he took part in
the demonstration and I continue
to stand in support of that," the
prime minister said.
"We gladly want to declare our
desire for as good and friendly
relations with the United States
as possible, but I don't really
know on what points that could
be achieved for the present," he
added.
Sweden, traditionally neutral,
has been demanding an end to
U.S. bombing of North Vietnam
and recognition of the Viet Cong's
political arm, the National Lib-
eration Front. After withdrawing
its diplomats from South Vietnam
last year, the government moved

toward closer contacts with Hanoi
through its amb'assador to Com-
munist China.
Sweden's largest newspaper,
the usually liberal Expressen, gave
this analysis of the turn of events
here: "For party tactical reasons,
the government hasn't been con-
tent to criticize the American
conduct of the war in Vietnam,
but has gone further and shown
itself- in solidarity with North
Vietnam, the NLF, and hate filled
attacks on the United States." ;

days.
But the rush continued
reached a peak on Friday.

and

By The Associated Press
WARSAW, Poland-Police and
students clashed for the', second
straight day yesterday in a run-
ning fight through the streets of
downtown Warsaw. The fighting
broke out during a students'
march to protest police interfer-
ence in a demonstration on the
campus of Warsaw University Fri-
day.
The scene resembled a battle-
field at times, with youths hurling
rocks, and bottles at helmeted
riot police and the police answer-
ing with rubber clubs and tear
gas.
* * *
NEW YORK - Gov. Nelson A.
Rockefeller has invited more
than 20- Republican leaders from
across the nation to his apart-
ment today to talk politics.
The object, his press secretary
said, is "to exchange views on the

situation of the party following
Gov. George Romney's withdrawal
from the presidential race." Rock-
efeller had backed Romney.
. * *
PRAGUE - Czech Communists
met at 66 party regional confer-
ences yesterday, with indications
they were discussing the "reform"
regime's biggest dilemma - how
to get rid of old line President
Antonin Novotny without resort-
ing to the Stalinist methods they
abhor.
The party's Prague section call-
ed for a plenary meeting of the'
Czech Communist Central Com-
mittee, presumably to hasten No-
votny's resignation and declared
"We should dissociate ourselves
from advocates of views and
practices which have harmed
the party" - an apparent refer-
ence to Novotny.

World News Roundup

!11

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,''I

T THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
GILBERT & SULLIVAN SOCIETY
Presentis
PRINCESS IDA
March 27, 28, 29, 30
Wednesday, Thursday Performances . $2.00
Friday, Saturday Performances $2.50
Saturday Matinee $1.50
'Tickets on sale 9:00 to 5:00, March 18 and 19 in the Fishbowl.
-e *

TODAY
ALBERT ELLIS:
President of the Institute for Rational Living
THE DISILLUSIONED SOCIETY
AND VISIONS OF UTOPIA

} $;.;?:
v.9 :iu

''

I

',I

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