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March 08, 1968 - Image 8

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-03-08

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, March 8, 1968

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY Friday, March 8, 1968

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WASHINGTON (CPS) - The
Commissioner of the U.S. Food
and Drug Administration, who has
opposed heavy penalties for the
possession of drugs in the past,
switched his stance when he testi-
fied before a Congressional sub-
committee early this week.
Dr. James L. Goddard, who re-
portedly was kept from testify-
ing last week because the John-
son Administration feared he
would oppose its drug proposals,
told the subcommittee members
he supports the proposed mea-
sures.
The Administration has asked
Congress to make the sale of
LSD and "other dangerous drugs"
a felony, and to make possession
of these drugs a misdemeanor. At
present the possession of LSD is
not a federal offense.
In testifying that he supports
the Administration's proposals on
drugs, Goddard made it clear that
he still has qualms about making
possession a federal crime.

He told the committee that
when the drug proposals were
being drawn up by Administrateon
officials, he made known his opin-
ion that "enforcement should con-
centrate on illegal traffic, that it
would be unwise to provide penal-
ties which might mark a large
number of young people just en-
tering adulthood as criminals be-
cause they were found in posses-
sion of a small amount of drugs for
personal use, and that such a
penalty was not necessary at this
time."
He went on to say, though, that
the federal law enforcement
agencies and the President favor
laws against drug possession, and
that "their judgment on the need
for this provision is one which I
respect and, therefore, I support
the Administration proposal."
Goddard did not refer to mari-
juana in his testimony, presum-
ably because the bill now under
study by the House subcommittee
on public health and welfare will
not affect existing marijuana laws.
Goddard has spoken out against
the marijuana laws in the past,

' Unliks Goddard, Henry Giordano
the head of the Bureau of Nar-
cotics, devoted a good part of
his testimony before the commit-
tee to a discussion of marijuana.
He emphasized that the use of
the drug is spreading rapidly, and
went on to say that "many areas
which were formerly free of drug
traffic now report a small but per-
sistent traffic, centering on the
'hippie' elements and college cam-
puses."
Glordano said that laws govern-
ing the so-called dangerous drugs,
particularly LSD, are grossly in-
adequate.' He suggested that the
relatively weak laws now govern-
ing the use of LSD have promoted
drug-use because, being much less
stringent than the laws regarding
marijuana, they have made the
marijuana laws "appear hypo-
critical.
"Many young people," Giordano
went on, "have a way of dis-
regarding laws which they think
are hypocritical, and so the lack
of sanctions governing such drugs

Till

K-I

NEW YORK (M) - Gov. Nelson
A. Rockefeller said Thursday that
he has not after all ruled out
running as a candidate for the
Republican presidential nomina-
tion in the Oregon primary in
May.
At the moment, he said at a
news conference, he has no in-
tention of entering the Oregon
primary, but he added: "I do not
make a definitive statement rul-
ing it out. I said I was ready, will-
ing to serve a call."
Romney
George Romney acknowledged
yesterday that Rockefeller's will-
ingness to accept a draft was a
factor Romney considered in quit-
ting the Republican White House
race.
"It was a surprise to me," the
Michigan governor told a news
conference. "It was one of the
things I had to take into account
when deciding what I was going
to do."
Rockefeller said he would "be
available if the public and the Re-
publican party want an alternate
approach." Yesterday's statement
was viewed as stronger than his
previously stated position that he
woulddaccept the nomination if
drafted.
Rockefeller's comments came in
answer to newsmen's questions on
whether he would consider enter-
ing the Oregon primary if former
Vice President Richard M. Nixon
were to make a heavy showing in
the New Hampshire primary.
"My efforts are not stopping
Nixon," the governor said, going
on to speak of his availability un-
der the prescribed conditions.

The two steps are interrelated,
and those close to Rockefeller re-
ported no final decisions on how
to proceed. There is some evidence
of division between those whot
want him to "cool it" and thosej
who favor an early decision.
Decision Expected
A decision on strategy is ex-
Dected between now and the
March 22 deadline for Rockefel-
ler to withdraw as a candidate in
the May presidential primary in
Oregon.3
Romney reiterated that he is

gates in reaching a decision on
whom the party will support.
Romney denied there had been
any "agreement" made prior to
his withdrawal from the race.
Reflecting on the campaign
Romney said he has "no bitter-
ness and no regrets."
"I did my best and did every
thing I could," he said. "I have
the great satisfaction to know I've
presented more specific solutions to
national problems - and that
includes Vietnam - than anyone
on the national scene."

not presently committed to any He said the people to whom he
candidate for the nomination, but presented his ideas personally
is willing to work with the GOP were "very favorably impressed.
governors and convention dele- But there weren't enough of them."
Senate AddsAmendment
To Open Housing Section

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however, saying that they are too I as LSD have actually helped inten-
harsh. sify problems with marijuana.'

qq

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WASHINGTON 0P) - The Sen-
ate voted 48 to 45 yesterday to
add another exemption, to the
open housing section of its civil
rights protection bill.
The amendment, offered by Sen.
Robert C. Byrd, (D-W.Va.), would
exempt nonoccupant owners of
single family dwellings from the
ban on discrimination in sales or
rentals.
Advocates of open housing op-
posed the amendment.
As written, the bill provided
that owners would be exempt only
if they handled the sale or rental
themselves, rather than through
a broker, and if they were the
occupant or the most recent oc-
cupant of the house.
Byrd's amendment provides that
an owner would be exempt,
whether or not he was the most
recent occupant, so long as lie
did not own more than three
single family dwellings and did
not sell more than one of them
within a 2 year period.

Byrd cited as an example a
widow who owns one house in
which she lives and another
across the street in which her
daughter lives.
If the daughter moves away,
Byrd said, the widow could not
qualify for an exemption under
the bill even if she sold or rented
the house herself since she was
not the most recent occupant.
"I believe that senators will
want to provide a clear cut ex-
emption in the case of single
family dwellings, especially when
the owner rents or sells the dwell-
ing without the assistance of a
real estate salesman or agency,"
he said.
Sen. Spessard Holland. (D-Fla.),
asked Byrd if the amendment
would apply to 'members of Con-
gress and other government offi-
cials who own more than one
home.
Byrd. said it would but that it
is "not for the benefit of senators
and House members."

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