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March 05, 1968 - Image 9

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-03-05

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Tuesday, March 5, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine

Tuesday, March 5, 1968 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Cagers
By BOB LEES
Associated Sports Editor
Northwestern's Wildcats
stumbled into the Events Build-
ing last Saturday looking for a
stepping-stone on their way to a
hopeful return to the thick of the
Big Ten Race.
They left with their tails be-
tween their legs, as the Wolver-
ines clawed their way to an ex-
citing 83-79 win.
Michigan did it the hard way,
too. For example, they threw the
ball away 12 times in the first
half, to Northwestern's six - yet
led by seven at the break.
After inceasing Lhis lead to ten
in the second half, Michigan pro-
ceeded to shift from their man-
to man defense to a zone - and
five and a half minutes later the
lead was gone. But a switch back
to the man-to-man resulted in
some key steals, and the Wol-
verines were back in business.
Stopped Guns I
Michigan actually won the
game by holding down the Wild-
cats' two most potent weapons -
rebounding and Dale Kelley.
Northwestern went into the game
leading the conference in the
former, yet Michigan outrebound-
ed them 62-53. And super-soph
Kelley was seventh in conference
scoring with 19 points per game.
On Saturday, he got four.
But for awhileEthe Wolverines
resembled the teem of earlier this
season. The good crowd of 9,326
watched the second-half Wildcat
rally with the resignation born of
familiarity, and when Jim Sarno's
foul shot put them ahead, 68-67,
a huge sigh went up.
Yet this wasn't the same team.
Coach Dave Strack called frequent
time outs, and punctuated his re-
marks with animated hand-claps,
ignoring the echoing claps which
rolled out of the stands. Obvious-
ly, Strack didn't want the home
season to end on such a sour note,
and neither did the fans.
Nor did the team. As leading
Wolverine scorer Dennis Stewart

'Bound Past

Wildcats, 83-79

*

*

*

Gophers Here After
Dual Colorado Wains

MICHIGAN'S DENNIS STEWART helped bring the Wolverine
cagers to an 83-79 victory over Northwestern last Saturday by
dropping in six straight points in the last minute of play. The
Junior forward scored 20 points in the game to lead all Michi-
gan scorers.

By JOHN SUTKUS
Michigan's hockey team takes
on Minnesota tonight at 8 p.m. in
the Coliseum in the first round of
the WCHA playoffs.I
The Wolverines won the right
to host the Gophers by pasting
Colorado College twice over the
weekend, 6-3 Friday night and
10-3 Saturday night. Michigan
Tech extended a helping hand by
downing Minnesota twice at
Houghton 5-4 and 4-2. The Wol-
verines' sights were set even high-
er, but North Dakota dumped Du-
luth Saturday night to clinch
third, after losing to the cellar
dwellers on Friday evening.
The playoff system, a source
of dissatisfaction to several:
WCHA coaches in years past, has
been revised with a couple of new
twists. Before this year, the play-
off pairings and sites were de-
termined by the beginning of the
season. Now, the pairings are ar-
ranged according to order of fin-
ish: first plays eighth, second
plays seventh, and so forth, with
the added condition that the
team finishing higher in the
standings gets home ice.
In addition, the winner of the
first-eighth game meets the
fourth-fifth winner in a two-
game total goals playoff next Fri-
day and Saturday nights at the
rink of the team that finished
higher in the league standings.
The other two winners play off
in a similar weekend series. The
WCHA Standings

two survivors receive the West's
berths in the NCAA hockey cham-
pionships at Duluth.
"This way the whole season
counts for something," notes
Michigan coach Al Renfrew. "Be-
fore, you could win the league
title and then end the season in
the playoffs without even the
home ice advantage."
The Wolverines worked their
way over the seventh-place Tig-
ers. "We skated hard and got a
couple of breaks," observed Ren-
frew. "But Colorado was a pretty
tired team by Saturday night."
Colorado met Michigan State
Tuesday and Wednesday before
coming to Ann Arbor. Friday they
managed to stay in the rink with
the Wolverines, but Saturday
Michigan won going away with
senior Harold Herman in the nets.
Sophomore Dave Perrin had
what Renfrew termed "his best
series of the year." Perrin, who
has finally shaken off the effect
of a back injury, scored two goals
in each game.
Renfrew's immediate concern is
Minnesota. The Wolverines al-
ready have beaten the Gophers
four times this season.
Minnesota sports one of the
more potent lines in the WCHA.
Wing Bill Klatt copped the league
scoring title with 30 points, fol-
lowed closely by centers Gary
Gambucci and Pete Fichuk with
29 and 28 respectively. Chuck
Norby, the other third of the
Klatt-Gambucci combo, finished
with 23 points.
Top Cager Coach
NEW YORK OP) - Guy Lewis
of the top-ranked University of
Houston Cougars was named the
college basketball Coach of the
Year for the 1967-68 season by
The Associated Press Monday.
The 46-year-old native of Arp,
Tex., finished far ahead of Johnny
Wooden of UCLA who was the
1966-67 Coach of the Year.

stated after the game, "We real-
ly felt we could win this one, in-
stead of petering out at the end
as we used to."
It was Stewart, too, who even-
tually led the way to the victory.
After a Bob Sullivan steal had
tied the score at 77 all, and Wild-
cat Mike Reeves blew the first of
a one and one situation, Stewart
was grabbed by forward Mike
Weaver. With :53 winking on the
clock, he calmly dropped in both
ends of his one and one, and the
Wolverines were up two.
Twenty-four s e c o n d s later,
Stewart was held by Wildcat Don
Adams, and the Wolverine junior
obligingly plopped in two more.

A short Stewart jumper 18 sec-
onds later then iced it, except for
a meaningless Wildcat basket
with four seconds to go.
Another standout for the Wol-
verines was Ken Maxey. The jun-
ior guard pumped in 17 points,
second only to Stewart's 20 for
team high, and was his usual
pestering best on defense. At one
point in the first half he brought
the crowd to its feet by throwing
in a long jumper, stealing the
pass across half court, then out-
racing- everybody to notch a
layup.
The Wolverine record now
stands at 10-13 overall, with a
5-8 record in Big Ten play. Only
one game -- at Iowa this week-
end - remains.
MICHIGAN

Meds exclusive design gives you this extra se-
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faster, blended with an inner layer of tiny fibers
to store more, longer.
Comes in the first gentle, flexible plastic applicator.
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Milltown, N.J. 08850. Indicate Regular or Super.

M-1! ANDt MODESS ARE TRADEMARKCS
: F PERSONAL PRODUCTS COMPANY

Name Shaw To Replace
*MeNease as Grid Coach

FINAL
W
Denver 15
Michigan Tech 15
North D'akota 13
MICHIGAN 11
Minnesota 13
MSU 4
Colorado College 4
Duluth 4

FG FT R

Tomjanovich, .f 7-18
Stewart, f 8-18
Sullivan, 6-17
Maxey, g 7-10
Pitts, g 4-11
McClellan, 1f 0-0
Henry, g 0-1.
Bloodworth, g 0-0
Total 32-75
FG Pct.: 42.7

2-3 20
4-4 12
3-5 8
3-3 3
5-11 7
2-2 0
0-0 0
0-0 1
19-28 62

The Michigan athletic depart-
ment announced over the weekend
that a new member has been add-
ed to the football coaching staff.
Robert Shaw, line coach at Buck-
nell, was named to assume re-
sponsibility of the defensive ends
and linebackers.
Shaw replaces Y. C. McNease
who departed in January in favor
of a head-coaching assignment at
Idaho.
Shaw's collegiate football ex-
perience goes, back to his play-
ing days at Clarion State in Pen-
nsylvania. He played center and
linebacker, was voted captain of
his team, and was named to the
Little All-America football squad.
He has served as an assistant
coach at Brookfield High in Ohio,
and as assistant and head mentor
at Niles McKinley, also in Ohio.
He then proceeded to Bucknell.
STUDENTOURS
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12 Countries
9 WEEKS
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Wolverine head coach Bump El-
liott said yesterday that Shaw will
move into Ann Arbor within a
week. His major duties will begin
with the opening of spring foot-
ball activity on March 19.
McNease was the first of two
coaches to leave the Wolverine
football staff this winter. Don
{James, defensive backfield coach,
resigned in favor of a position at
Colorado a week ago. It has been
speculated that a successor to
James may be named later this
week.

NORTHWESTERN

P
2
3
4
3
4
0
0
0
16
2
4
1
3
3
3
2
2
0
1
21

T
16
20
15
17
13
2
0
0
83
21
17
4
12
4
9
2
10
0
0
79

L
3
5
8
7
9
13
16
20

T
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
0

Pct
.833
.750
.614
.611
.591
.325
.200
.167

+

Use Daily Classifieds

+

i

Weaver, f
Adams, f
Saunders, c
Gamber, g
Kelley, g
Sarno, c
Davis, I
Reeves, g
Bresnahan, f
Burke, c
total
FG Pct.; 35.9
MICHIGAN
Northwestern

8-12 5-5 9

8-23 1-2
1-2 2-4
4-14 4-6
1-9 2-2
4-12 1-1
1-6 0-0
5-11 0-1
0-0 0-0
0-0 0-0
32-89 15-21

15
4
4
2
6
1
3
0
1
53

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Attendance: 9,326

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GROVE PRESS, Dept. CP-34
315 Hudson St., New York, N.Y.
10013
Please send me, postage prepaid,
the books whose numbers I have
circled below.: Enclosed -please
find $.............. (No C.O.D.)

8125
B132
B137
8141
B142
B143

B147
8149
8155
8157
E403
E411

E417
E425
E430
E432
E436
E438

E442
E452
E453
E455
E456
E457

8144 E413 E439
B145 E414 -E440
8146 E416 E441
Name........................

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