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March 05, 1968 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-03-05

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Tuesday, March 5, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Tuesday, March 5, 1968 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Three

INVOKES CLOTURE RULE:

Communist Forces

LBT

Senate
WASHINGTON (P) - The Sen-
ate clamped 'a cut-off yesterday
stopping further debate on a com-
promise civil rights protection and
open housing bill.
On the fourth attempt to in-
voke cloture, the Senate voted
65 to 32 in favor of imposing the
debate-limiting rule.
This gave cloture adherents the
bare two thirds majority they
needed. Three previous attempts
fell short by 7, 6 and 4 votes
respectively.
The vote seemed to assure Sen-
ate passage of the administra-
tion backed civil rights protection
ing provision. But it remained un-
certain just what form the hous-

Halts Filibuster

Strike Saigon, Pleiku1

Proposes
Billion C

New
)utlay

bill with its added on open hous-
ing provision will take.
From now on each Senator will
be limited to one hour's speaking
time on the compromise bill and
the scores of proposed amend-
ments.
Once all the amendments have
been acted on, unlimited debate on
passage of the bill will be possible
unless cloture is voted a second
time.
But the bill's supporters were
confident that the back of the
opposition was broken by today's
vote.
Much of the opposition was
based on the bill's open housing
amendment. As originally pro-
posed by Sens. Walter F. Mondale.

Final Performance Tonight

I

(D-Minn.) and Edward W. Brooke,
(R-Mass.), this would have out- SAIGON (M - Planes and guns
lawed discrimination in the sale roared around the edges of Saigon
or rental of an estimated 97 per early yesterday after Communist
cent of all housing in the country. forces mounted their heaviest co-
The coverage was whittled down ordinated attacks in two weeks
to about 70 per cent in a compro- throughout the country.
mise version worked out last Enemy shells pounded widely
week. scattered allied military instal-
Senate Majority Leader Mike lations and a Viet Cong squad
Mansfield told the Senate that captured a hospital for peasants
"the nation is in the most dif- run by an American woman doc-
"thenatin i in he ost if-tor in the central highlands.
ficult period in its history, and The U.S. Command said only
I include the Civil War in that
statement." one of the attacks could be re-
He s i agarded as militarily significant:
He said it was nottime fur a strike at headquarters of the
'apprehension but a time for un U.S. 4th Infantry Division at
derstanding, reminding his col- Camp Enari in the central high-
leagues that this is "a conglo- lands 250 miles north of Saigon.
merate nation" made up of many It added, however, that damage
different races and peoples. was slight and casualties were
-Sen. Jacob K. Javits, (R-N.Y.), very light in attacks on six air
a leader of the civil rights forces, bases, two U.S. command posts
said they had been working tire--
lessly to win the necessary two
thirds margin. Kx 1 Pl 11111T
This is an enormous crisis for P a
our nation," he told the Senate.
Republican Leader Everett M.M arch, Talks
Dir ksen of Illinois said in a final9
appeal for cloture that "all I have Martin Luther King Jr. said
o agin with, irisen joined yesterday he will meet soon with
Toeinwither Dietrkseinin civil rights leaders who are 'prone
with Southern senators i fight- to violence' in an effort to make
ng the bill but he later switched certain there are no riots during
around and worked out the com- his poor peoples' campaign in
promise measure with a biparti- Washington.
san civil rights bloc. Hoping to prevail on Congress
Three of the key votes that put to
over cloture, the rule restricting pass legislation providing jobs
each senator to one hour's speak- nd income for the nation's poor,
ing time on the bill as amended King has called a nation wide
were withheld until the last min- march to be held on April 22.
ute.e wKing said he has already met
--e-----with Stokely Carmichael and Rap
Brown, both militant black lead-
er's. Both have given support to
his campaign, he said.

and four other allied installations.
In the strike at the 4th Divi-
sion's camp in Pleiku Province,
enemy troops attacked with 10
rounds of 122mm rocket fire and
an undetermined number of 82mm
mortar shells.
"This was the only significant
shelling reported," a U.S. spokes-
man said. "There was light dam-
age to aircraft and the airfield
was closed for a time due to a
cratered runway."
Officers noted there were no
follow-up ground attacks to iocket
and mortar shellings. They declin-
ed to characterize the assaults as
the beginning of an expected Com-
inunist third wave offensive.
Raid Saigon
While artillery thumped, propel-
l er driven AlH Skyraiders dived
bombed a section of Saigon four
miles from the center of the city.
A U.S. spokesman described the
attacks as "our standard harass-
ment" to keep the Communists
out of Saigon.
A South Vietnamese official said
allied troops and police were dis-
i patched to strategic areas around
i Saigon during the Monday night
curfew after reports reached head-
quarters that the Viet, Cong had
planned to blow all the bridges
in and out of the city.
This report could not be con-
firmed with U.S. officials.
Capture Hospital
A Viet Cong squad seized the
hospital run by Dr. Patricia Smith
of Seattle, Wash., outside the cen-
tral highlands strong point of
Kontum. They blew up a labora-
tory and X-ray building and firedF
into a ward filled with Montagn-
ards.

For

Health Program

WASHINGTON UP) - President
Johnson proposed a $15.6 billion'
"Health in America" program to
Congress yesterday that would
more than double federal outlays
for birth control programs, boost
efforts to slash infant deaths and
provide new incentives for the
training of more doctors.
In a special message, Johnson
outlined "five major new goals"
-to curb infant mortality, pro-
vide more health personnel, com-
bat soaring medical costs, lower
the accidental rate, and seek vol-
unteer efforts by doctors, hospitals
and others to provide better health
for all Americans.
The $15.6 billion price tag for
the fiscal year beginning July 1
would boost the current annual
outlay $8 billion.
Increase Subsidies
One major feature of the ad-
ministration bill would give bigger
subsidies to medical schools, help-
ing increase their enrollment, and
provide federal grants to cover all
costs of major changes needed to
hike enrollments, including con-
struction of dormitories.
Johnson asked Congress to in-
crease funds for birth control ac-
tivities from $25 million to $61
million. He said this would make
family planning information and
birth control devices or drugs

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
PROFESSIONAL THEATRE
PROGRAM
PRESENTS

p1J.V

available to an additional 3 mil-
lion women "if they so desire."
He also announced plans to
create a center for study of pop-
ulation and human reproduction,
primarily to direct family planning
research, and asked for an initial
appropriation of $12 million to
support it.c
Johnson said infant mortality
is "inexcusably high" although it
has dropped from 25.2 deaths per
1,000 children under the age of!
one in 1963, to 22.1 last year.
Noting that the United States
ranks only 15th in infant mortar-
ity, Johnson said the nation
"should lead the world in saving
its young."
He asked Congress to provide
an additional $58 million next year'
for maternal and child health care
programs. He said the goal should
be to eliminate all problems in this
area by 1973.
. He also asked for another $215
million or a total of $1.4 billion,
for child health services.
Proposing a new Health Man-
power Act, Johnson said this
measure would consolidate and
continue programs now being car-
ried out under laws that expire
in June, 1969.
Johnson also proposed some
ideas aimed at lowering the
amount that American families
now spend on drugs. He asked Con-
gress to authorize the government.
to establish within a relative nar-
row range the "reasonable cost"
of drugs the government now pays
for under a variety of programs.
Because of the size of federal
outlays in this area, the idea is
that drug costs generally would
come down.
However,the message did not
propose adding to medicare bene-
fits the cost of prescription drugs
taken at home.
Senate hearings recently have
revealed enormous differences in
prices various companies charge
for the same drug.
Cheapest of the drugs are those
sold by chemical, or generic, names
rather than brand names. A. fed-
eral task force currently is running
tests to see if generic drugs per-
form as well and are as safe as
the brand names.
Sources said the President's pro-
posal may indicate the administra-

tion is confident that many gen-
eric drugs will be found to be
equivalent.
He also urged publication of
an official "U.S. Compendium of
Drugs"-available not only to doc-
tors and pharmacists but also to
the general public - that would
contain "complete and accurate in-
formation about prescription drugs
-use, dosage, warnings, manufac-
ture, generic and brand names, and
facts about their safety and effec-
tiveness."
Ore Strike
Negotiation
Gets Boost
WASHINGTON UP) - Copper
strike negotiators came to the cap-
ital yesterday at President John-
son's bidding for day and night
bargaining to try to settle the 7Y
month old labor dispute.
Representatives of 26 striking
unions, four giant copper firms,
and the secretaries of defense,
labor and commerce were to par-
ticipate in the negotiations.
"I shall request the parties to
resume collective bargaining ne-
gotiations on a round the clock
basis," Johnson said Friday in
summoning all parties in the dis-
pute to the White House at 4 p.m.
Monday.
Johnson, in resorting to extra-
ordinary White House bargaining
which he has used in several past
major labor disputes, said that
without his intervention there was
"no foreseeable prospect" of a
settlement.
Dwindling copper supplies have
been further curtailed by a long-
shoremen's boycott against im-
ported supplies and Johnson said
a copper shortage could jeopardize
defense production.
The dispute, involving some
50,000 strikers in 22 states, has
been deadlocked over the 'union's
demand for companywide bargain-
ing at each of the big four copper
firms - Kennecott, Anaconda,

smashing
after
shave.

JOHN

RT

PRESENTS
National Theatre of Canada
SHA K E SP E AR RE'S
"A MmNight's
eamith

The Hit Musical
also starrrng
LINDA MICHELE
Book and Lyrics by
ALAN JAY LERNER.
Music by
BURTON LANE
MON.-TUES. - HILL
AUDITORIUM
MAR. 4-5 8:30 P.M.

Phelps Dodge and
Smelting and Refining.

American

l

r =- -=----_-- - --

BRITISH
STERLING

DOUGLAS RAIN MARTHA HENRY
as Bottom as Titania

I

Directed by JOHN HIRSCH

Designed by LESLIE HURRY

So fine a gift,
it's even sold
in jewelry stores.
After shave
from $3.50.
Cologne
from $5.00.

SOLE U.S. ENGAGEMENT !

GUILD HOUSE
802 Monroe
TUESDAY, MARCH 5-Noon Symposium:
"ON SOCIAL CHANGE"
Lunch 25c
SPEAKERS-Nine Students of
law from Argentina
MUSIVER SOCIy

April

1-6

Mendelssohn Theatre

TICKETS ON SALE WEEK DAYS
10:00A.M. TO 5:00 P.M.
HILL AUr"' . <' T"".ET OFFICE

SEATS NOW ON SALE
at PTP Ticket Office, Mendelssohn Theatre
PRICES: Mon., Tues., Wed. & Thurs. Eves.: Orch.: $5.50, 4.50
Fri. & Sat. Eves.: Orch.: $6.00, 5.00-Singles Only
Thursday Matinee: Orch.: $5.00, 4.00
. SATURDAY MATINEE SOLD OUT
BALCONY SOLD OUT ALL PERFORMANCES

Essential oils imported from Great Britain.
Compounded in U.S.A

THE WORLD'S FIRST

I.

I

11

on election eve, this Monday

- U AL

""N"I ftAOU O" NI 0 1 f 1 V"Is I I

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