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February 25, 1968 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-02-25

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Sunday, February 25, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

- Ar r--I 4", AT 7IfQ C Q T rn1TL'L

MHue C
ueThant
MoppngUp
Continues As
Fights Flare
BULLETIN
0 Saigon ()-American bomb-
ers attacked for the first time in
the war Saturday the Hanoi
river port facility 1.8 miles
southeast of the center of the
city, the U.S. Command reported
Sunday.
The strike on Hanoi's port fa-
cility,sheretofore on the list of
targets out of bounds to U.S.
pilots, was believed to have re-
quired specific approval from
the Pentagon, possibly even
President Johnson, since it is so
close to the center of Hanoi.
SAIGON ()-Allied troops be-
gan slugging away at remaining
Communist pockets in Hue's Cita-
del late yesterday following Fri-
day night's recapture of the palace
grounds from enemy forces. Other
fights flared on the outskirts
A battalion of U.S. Marines
pushed out of the old imperial
capital and liberated a South Viet-
namese engineer battalion that
had held out for 25 days against
surrounding enemy forces little
more than a mile west of town.
South of the Marine sweep,
troopers of the U.S. 10n1stAirborne
Division moved through another
enemy infiltrated area.
Other avenues of escape around
Hue were being worked over by
U.S. Air Cavalry Division troop-
ers and South Vietnamese rangers.
A company of Black Panther
rangers, all volunteers, and a bat-
talion of Vietnamese infantrymen
made the final assault that
wrested the palace grounds in the
Citadel from Communist hands.
They recovered virtually un-
damagedthered lacqueraand gilt
throne on which Vietnam's rulers
once received their subjects.
South Vietnamese forces report-
ed that in this and other run-
ning actions in Hue during the
day they killed 250 enemy troops,
while losing five dead and 22
wounded.
U.S. headquarters in Saigon
said the fighting in Hue through
Friday, the most substantial to
result from the Viet Cong's lunar
new year offensive, had cost the
Communists 4,173 men killed.
It reported 119 Americans and
363 South Vietnamese were killed;
961 Americans and 1,242 South
Vietnamese wounded.
A n emergency airlift of food has
been ordered by American of fi-
cials to meet a critical shortage in
Hue.
U.S. authorities also have begun
the emergency purchase of fish,
Vegetables and other staples. Since
the city was virtually overrun by
the Communists Jan. 31, the refu-
gee swollen population of almost
145,000 has been living on rice
and the small supply of other
foods then on hand.

itadel
P ushc

Secured

by

for

Peace

Allies,
,Talks
UNITED NATIONS, N.Y. UP)-
Secretary General U Thant assert-
ed yesterday the door is open for
Vietnam peace talks despite the
current intensified fighting and
that negotiations will begin within
a few days if the bombing of
North Vietnam is halted.
The secretary general said he
had been assured by Hanoi rep-

Washington Expects Increase
In Soviet Aid to N. Vietnamese
WASHINGTON UP)-The Soviet 1 munist East European countries with $350 million the year before,
Union is apparently North Viet- contributed perhaps $50 million, with the emphasis on air defense
nam's largest supplier of weapons Unlike China's economy, hobbled items.
and economic aid today and its by cultural revolution upheavals. These include surface - to - air
assistance may climb further if i the Russian economy can divert f.SAM) missiles, anti-aircraft ar-
the pace of the war steps up. much more to Vietnam if the tillery, radar equipment, fighter
According to preliminary Pen- Kremlin leaders choose. planes and ammunition.
tagon estimates, aid to Hanoi from Step-up Shipments Most of this equipment is be-
her Communist allies probably in- Current Soviet deliveries amount lieved to have been supplied out
creased to about $1 billion in 1967 to perhaps one-fifth of one per of existing Soviet stockpiles, ex-
-up considerably from some $730 cent of Russia's gross national cept for ammunition which may
million the year before product. The Soviets have indi- be coming out of current produc-
Biggest Share cated they will step-up Vietnam tion.

Ijf.i.) .A7Ei3 I 11 IlL Vi J r1

,3uarril if

I

-Associated Press
COFFINS ARRIVE in Hue, the ancient imperial capital of Vietnam, for the bodies of those killed
in the recent battle and resulting street fighting for control of the city. Here a South Vietnamese
navy craft, fully loaded with coffins for the hundreds of civilian dead, arrives at the pier in Hue.
Fulb right Claims McNamara
Ignored Cable Before Reacing

w, 1W1V1 kt, Moscow's shipments, valued at E
sentatives that talks would start about $700 million, accounted for
as soon as a bombing ban became the biggest share in North Viet-
effective and that the Unitedl
Ste coud bring u e any ater nam's supply line in 1967 and for;
States could bring up any matter much of the total increase over
it chose, including a reduction of the previous year.
military operations in'South Viet- Red China sent in an estimatedc
nam. $250 million worth, roughly $75 1
Thant's view were made public million more than in 1966. Com-
in a 1,250 word statement assess-
ing his recent round of discussionsI
with interested world leaders in- sA sks e
cluding President Johnson and Johnson
Soviet Premier Alexei N. Kosygin.G
Unless the essential steps are!
taken now to initiate peace talks,
he said, "the conclusion is ines-
capablethat there will be con-: AUSTIN. Tex. (M)-With "na-
tinued intensification and escala- Itoa nt n oetcpae
tion of the conflict, resulting int tional unity and domestic peaced
unforeseeable developments with at stake, the government signed
dire consequences, up top businessmen from all over
"There can be no victory, no {the nation Saturday to round up+
eeaonlymorbsffero nvtor jobs for the 500,000 unemployed1
defeat, only 1more sufeigmr in big city ghettoes.
death and more destruction," he bgct htos
said. "The very survival of Viet- Mid-March will be kick-off time+
nam is at stake. It is time to call for the 50 largest cities.
a halt." Most of the jobs probably will goI
to Negroes. The man in charge of
The secretary general said his the unprecented campaign is Hen-+
discussions, during his trip to New ry Ford II, chairman of the Ford1
Delhi, Moscow, London, Paris and Motor Co.
Washingthon, had convinced him Confers with Johnson
that a halt in the U.S. bombing Ford flew to the LBJ Ranch
of North Vietnam is the ids from Washington yesterday mor-
pensable first step. ning. He conferred with President
"If such a step were to be taken," Johnson, and then made the 65
he declared, "I am more than ever mile trip to the White House press
convinced that meaningful talks room here to tell reporters about1
will take place much earlier than the program for helping the hard
is generally supposed, even per- core unemployed.
haps within a matter of a few "For the most part," he said,
days." "These are people who, in the past,
Among those with whom Thant have been written off as unem-
conferred were North Vietnamese ployable, because of lack of job
Consul General Nguyen Hoa in skills, work experience, education
New Delhi and Hanoi's Delegate and social adaptability.
General Mai Van Bo in Paris. He "Yet, as we look at the social and
disclosed for the first time details racial situation that is under-
of these talks, including assurances mining this country with fear,
from Bo that negotiations would hatred and discord, nothing can be
begin as soon as the bombing stop- plainer than the fact that these
ped. people must be given the chance
The secretary general said he to earn decent lives for them-
had been told by Bo that the Unit- selves.
ed States could bring up any mat- "It is no longer solely a matter
ter in the talks, including reduc- of social justice and the principles
tion of the fighting in South Viet- of democracy. Our very national
nam and the question of recon- unity and domestic peace are at
vening the Geneva Conference. stake."

WASHINGTON () - Secretary'
of Defense Robert S. McNamara,'
in testimony made public yester-
day, said he issued orders after
the Gulf of Tonkin incident in
1964 to withhold retaliatory Amer-+
ican air raids "until we were+
damned sure the attack had taken'
place."
But Sen. J. W. Fulbright (D-
Ark.), chairman of the Senate 1
Foreign Relations Committee, said
Tuesday that the commander of
the U.S.S., Maddox cabled his su-
periors "freak weather and an
overeager sonar man" could have
contributed to reports that North
Vietnamese torpedo boats had at-
tacked.;
Air War
Had the Congress known of this
cable, said Fulbright, it might not
have subsequently authorized the
President to begin an air war
against North Vietnam and the1
build-up of U.S. troops.
McNamara said Capt. John Her-'
rick, who sent the cable on Aug. 4,
19 64, swiftly resolved his doubts:
"He did not doubt there was any
attack. He did not say so in his
message."
Slightest Doubt
Fulbright, in the transcript of
closed-door testimony on the Ton-
kin incident, said, "It never oc-
curred to me that there was the
slightest doubt, certainly on the
part of Herrick, who was in charge
of the task force, that this attack
took place. He obviously had
doubts. His telegram so states."

There were two incidents in
Tonkin. The first, on Aug. 2, 1964,
was an assault on the Maddox by
North Vietnamese vessels. It has
not been contested. But the second
crucial affair occurred on the
dark and cloudy night of Aug. 4.
That is the one at issue.
And that is the one referred to
in a Herrick cable read by Ful-
bright:
Weather Effects
"Review of action makes many
recorded contacts and torpedoes
fired appear doubtful. Freak
weather effects and overeager son-
ar men may have accounted for
many reports. No actual visual
sightings by Maddox. Suggest com-
plete evaluation before any further
action."
At that time, after the initial
incident, the Maddox had been
joined on its Tonkin Gulf patrol
by the destroyer U.S.S. C. Turner
Joy. Both ships were said to have
come under attack.E

shipments if Hanoi's needs in- I'ire at u.s. rianes
crease. Vast quantities of ammunition
U.S. spending in Vietnam last have been aimed at U.S. planes.
year has been estimated at about Several thousand SAM's - maybe
$25 billion. $30 million worth-were reported
Information received here in. fired at American craft during
dicates that Soviet arms deliveries 1967 along with other ordnance.
to North Vietnam came to some The SAM's were fired from per-
$500 million in 1967 compared haps 30 launchers, which were
moved around several hundred
prepared launching sites in North
Businessmen "Vietnam.
i The Soviets are also reported
to have provided some bombers
and tanks, but these arms have
tet N e Jo s not played much of a role in the
fighting. Nor are the Russians be-
live to be supplying advanced
In answer to a question. Ford new weapons systems.
sa o ma

McNamara said the Herrick
cable was sent "perhaps three
hours" after the Communist attack
was reported.
Fire Torpedoes
"Although the message itself
does not state that he questioned
whether an attack had taken place,
it did say that many reported con-
tacts and torpedoes fired appeared
doubtful," he said.
This was quickly resolved Mc-
Namara said. "Roughly an hour
and 20 minutes later," he said,
"the commander of the task force
reported to the commander in the
Pacific that he was certain the
original ambush was bona fide.
Confusing Picture
"Details of the action present a
confusing picture," McNamara
said, "but he had made positive
visual sightings of cockpit lights
or similar lights passing near the
Maddox and the Turner Joy re-
ported two torpedoes passed near
her."

said "I don't mean that any 500,1
000 jobs is going to mean that
there will be no riots this summer
or in the future . . . but you have
to do something to alleviate the
problem. We are not going into
education. We are not going into a!
lot of other areas that still have
got to be handled."
As chairman, Ford is at the top
of a pyramid of "blue chip" execu-
tives from business and industry
assembled into the National Al-
liance of Businessmen (NAB) to
carry out Johnson's job opportu-
nities in the business sector jobs
program.
Productive Workers
The objective is to turn hardcore
unemployed into productive work-
ers-100,000 by July, 1969 and 500,
000 by the summer of 1971.
In addition NAB has been asked
to try to find meaningful jobs
for 200,000 disadvantaged young
people by the coming summer.
The President set these goals in
a manpower program he outlined
in a special message to Congress a
month ago.
The vice chairman of the alli-
ance, J. Paul Austin, president of
the Coco Cola Co., and the chief
executive officer, Leo Beebe, a
Ford vice president on loan, joined
Ford in the Saturday conference
with Johnson.

Most of the Soviet weapons -
except for such items as large
helicopters which cannot get
through existing railway tunnels-
are believed transported to North
Vietnam across the Chinese main-
land.
Economic Aid
Sea routes are used for material
classified as economic aid-though
with North Vietnam's economy on
a wartime footing' these goods have
a direct bearing on her total effort.
Some $200 million in Soviet
economic aid in 1967, up $50 mil-
lion from 1966, is reported to have
included .petroleum, trucks, trac-
tors, rail equipment, bridge struc-
tures, barges, machinery, food
and fertilizer.
Russian ships are said to have
paid around 200 calls at North
Vietnamese ports during the year,
a five-fold increase over the early
1960's.
Defense Department specialists
say most of North Vietnam's in-
dustrial output lost to U.S. bomb-
ing has been replaced by imports
from Russia and China.
mAt the same time neither the
Soviets nor the Chinese have sent
personnel to North Vietnam, in
any scale comparable to the U.S.
presence in South Vietnam.
The Soviets are believed to have
only around 2,000 military person-
nel in North Vietnam.

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