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January 09, 1968 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-01-09

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TUESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SEVEN

TUSSDAY, JANUARY 9,1968 TUE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE SEVEN

- ..- - - I -

I

Reorganization

Stays

AD

Pick

By HOWARD KOHN
Who succeeds H. O. (Fritz) Crisler as athletic director
depends on how the Regents define the responsibilities of the
position, President Robben Fleming told The Daily yesterday.
Fleming explained that he would postpone his appointment
until the Regents act on the reorganization of the University's
athletic structure.
A athletic director, Crisler's sphere has been limited to inter-
collegiate. athletics.
But, because of vague Regental by-laws, the Board in Con-,
trol of Intercollegiate Athletics has been left with financing'
intramuarls although it does not administer the program.
And, because the Regents have always assumed that physical
education majors intend to become coaches or teachers, the
School of Education has been left with the Department of
Physical Education.
A 32-page report by a presidential advisory commission,
chaired by Prof. Douglas A. Hayes, recommends that significant
changes be made.
It suggests that money for intramurals be drawn from the
University's General Fund and that an Advisory Board of In-
tramurals and Recreation be created.
It further suggests that a separate School of Physical
Education be established, separate and distinct from the School
of Education.
Some members of the commission originally expressed re-
servations about forming the new school. But when the School
of Education would not face up to remedying its curricular
requirements for the PE department, the commission unani-
mously recommended a new school.
However, it could not agree on who to put in authority,
splitting into a majority and minority bloc by a 7-4 vote.
In the majority opinion, Crisler's successor would have juris-
diction over both athletics and physical education-a popular
form of organization in many of the nation's universities.
Davey Nelson, a leading candidate to replace Crisler, pres-
ently holds this dual position at Delaware.
A single director-dean, the majority argues, could coordinate
programs and facilities without benefit of a high administrative
referee, avoiding those inevitable squabbles between athletic,
intramural and PE demands.
Top T hree Maintain
AP Cage o Lead

The director-dean would also be able to appoint an asso-
ciate director to handle public relations, coaches, athletic
medicine, etc.
The director-dean would be responsible to the Board in
Control of Intercollegiate Athletics (for athletics), the Vice-
president of Academic Affairs (for physical education) and
the Vice-President of Student Affairs (for intramurals) (see left
flow chart).
He would be advised by the intramural board on student
recreation needs. Buthe would be expected to have expertise
in both the athletic and academic realms.
The majority bloc assumes that a man with these qualifica-
tions can be secured.
The minority block attacks this assumption, holding that
any candidate-no matter how competent-would be prejudiced
one way or the other because of his background in his sub-
sequent policy decisions about athletics, intramurals and PE.
4 4
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It recommends that a separate athletic director and PE
dean be appointed.
"Since the athletic program is not academic in its nature, its
administration should be independent of the instructional pro-
grams of the University," the minority argue.
Indiana and Illinois, the only two Big Ten schools with a
PE school, have a distinct dean and director.
The University's Senate Faculty also supports the minority
opinion.
According to the minority, the athletic director would be
immediately responsible to the Board in Control while the dean
would answer to the vice-presidents (see right flow chart).
Fleming, citing the case of a dean who died before he could
take his appointment at Wisconsin, explains that he wants the
man to fit the job and not vice versa.
The Regents are expected to act on the recommendations
at their monthly meeting, Jan. 19.
s .. AA
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By The Associated Press
There was a game of basket-
ball chairs, but UCLA, Houston
and North Carolina remain seat-
ed in the front row of The As-
sociated Press' major college bas-
ketball rankings.
UCLA, 10-0, still tops the Top
Ten poll, released Monday, with
389 points and 38 first place votes.
Houston, 15-0, remains second
with 351 points and the other
first place vote, and North Car-
olina, 9-1, retains third with 301
points.
Kentucky beat Vanderbilt 94-78
last Saturday and replaced the
Commodores in fourth place. Van-
derbilt dropped to eighth.
Tennessee move from sixth to
fifth, and Utah advanced fron
seventh to sixth. St. Bonaventure
jumped from ninth to seventh,
while New Mexico, 10th last week,
moved to ninth. Columbia is the
only newcomer to the Top Ten,
taking over 10th place after
trounching two Ivy League op-
ponents.
St. Bonaventure, 11-0,, and New
Mexico, 13-0, along with UCLA
are the only unbeaten members of
the Top Ten.
The Top Ten, with first-place
votes in parentheses, season rec-
ords through games of Sunday,
Jan. 7, and total points on a 10-
9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1 basis.

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

UCLA 38
Houston 1
North Carolina
Kentucky
Tennessee
Utah
St. Bonaventure
Vanderbilt
New Mexico
Columbia

10-0
15-0
9-1
8-1
7-1
11-1
11-0
1Q-2
13-0
9-3

389
351
301
256
183
159
135
114
89
44

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NHL Standings

1

Eastern Division
W L T Pts.
Chicago 20 10 9 49
Boston 20 12 6 46
Toronto 17 13 8 42
New York 17 14 7 41
Montreal 16 14 9 41
Detroit 17 15 6 40
West Division
Philadelphia 18 13 6 42
Los Angeles 16 21 3 35
Pittsburgh 14 18 6 34
* Minnesota 13 15 8 34
st. Louis 14 20 3 31
Oakland 8 25 7 23

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