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February 22, 1968 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-02-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 1969

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE NINE

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 1968 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE NINR

Galbraith: Hockey With a French Accent

By DIANA ROMANCHUK
French isn't usually a require-
rnent fore playing hockey but in
the case of Michigan junior Doug
Galbraith it was a necessity.
In fifth grade, Galbraith, who
grew up just south of Montreal,
decided he wanted to play organ-
ized hockey. "The English school
system didn't have any team -
even interested in athletics," he
recalls, "So, I played. I spoke
better French than I did En-
Three years in the States have
wiped out most of his accent ex-
cept an occasional 'bloody' and
a long-a 'again', but not h i s
Canadian-nutured playing ability.
Beginning at St. Johns ("If my
dad hadn't dragged me to the
first practice, I probably wouldn't
have continued playing), he grew
up. through Bantams ("where I
received the MVP trophy from
'Rocket' Richard' ") until a change
of scenery took him to Montreal
and four years of Junior teams ("I
was shocked when I finished third
In scoring my first year.").
The quiet-spoken blond never
had any real thoughts about col-

asked him what he wanted to do
and off the top of his head he
replied, "Maybe I'll go to Michi-
gan and play hockey." (He'd heard
they had a good school and team.)
Then, a coach at St. Lawrence
in Canton, New York first sug-
gested the idea of a scholarship
and several applications later
Doug's spur-of-the-moment ans-
wer became reality, luckily for
Michigan hockey. The shy forward
currently leads the Wolverines
with 16 goals and 14 assists, one
point ahead of co-captain Bruce
Koviak.
Presently dissatisfied with his
physical education major Gal-
braith plans to take "a lot" of
business courses next year. "Can-
ada isn't college-orientated," he
explained, "so I had no good idea
of what I wanted to take and more
or less got stuck in Phys Ed. I
still don't knowkwhat I want to
be when I get out, though.
He would, of course, like to play
hockey, maybe even coach, "in
some rich prep school back East."
But one thing he is sure of -
"I'm not going back to Quebec.
I've gone back home and the 'kids

are doing the same things they
were when I left. They're satisfied
where they are."
"Me, I'm glad I came to Mich-
igan. I've had the chance to go
West, see Denver, Minneapolis,
and St. Louis."
The traveling comes as one
bonus of being a member of the
Michigan hockey team. "I've al-
ways played center," Galbraith
remembers, "but when I got here
Renfrew moved me to left wing."
Besides the position change, he
had to adjust to the collegiate
rules which allow passing over two
lines and does not allow offensive
checking.
Airing his opinions on the sub-
ject of college versus pro rules,
Galbraith explained, "The basics
of hockey - skating, shooting,
and passing - are not changed.
In fact, here you have more
chance to do that. There are more
breakaways because of no cen-
ter line.
"I didn't have any trouble ad-
justing, but if I ever play pro
hockey, I'll have to revert back
to the old ways. Only I don't think
the college rules can stand up
much longer. The change has got-
to come in four or five years."

He did, however, have one criti-
cism of the WCHA - the schedul-
ing: "There is too big a difference
in the number of games each
team plays.
"If a Michigan player wants to
go for the league scoring champ-
ionship, it is almost impossible,
because some teams play four or
five more games than we do.
Though Canadian, Galbraith
maintains that, "Canadian kids
aren't as eager to skate anymore.
When I was a kid, I skated when
it was 15 below. My mother made
a rule that I had to quit at 7
o'clock to do my homework. To-
day, my brothers, for example,
only skate twice a week and in-
doors, besides."
He foresees the day when the
Michigan icers will travel toI
California to face UCLA, although
it will be too late for this French-
speaking English Canadian to go
along.

FROSH GYM TOURNEY AT MSU

THE MICHIGAN FROSH GYMNASTS travel to East Lansing tomorrow night for meet competition
with the freshmen from MSU, Iowa, Indiana, and Ohio State. The contest will be held in the MSU
Intramural Building beginning at 7:30 p.m. Pictured above are Ken Hutchison, Kelley Cannon, John
Cotsirilos, Ed Howard, Tim Wright, and Rick McCurdy. Missing are Mike Gluck, Murray Plotkin,
Doug Keats, and Bob Wagner.

DOUG GALBRAITH

lege. "The kids there (Quebec)
don't value education like they do
in the States. Only two of us
on the Junior 'A' team were still
in school."
Ironically, one day as a high
school junior, a TV interviewer

I

PRO SPORTS:
Canadiens Whip Rangers, Increase Lead

Martin
Marietta
C areers

NEW YORK - Dick Duff and
Caude Provost each flipped in
two goals last night as the red-
hot Montreal Canadiens smashed
the New York Rangers 7-2 for
0 their seventh straight National
Hockey League victory.
The Canadiens shot to a 2-1
first period lead, pulled away on
Duff's 21st and 22nd goals and
breezed to their 19th victory in
the last 20 games. The loss
M snapped an eight-game unbeaten
string for the Rangers.
John Ferguson, ,Provost and
Rousseau scored for Montreal in
the third period in which Reg
Fleming connected for the Rang-

ers' other goal -before a sellout
crowd of 17,250.
* * *
Blues Blast Leafs
TORONTO - Rookie Gary Sa-
bourin and veteran Jerry Melnyk
fired two goals each as the expan-
sionist St. Louis Blues rapped sag-
ging Toronto 5-1 in a National
Hockey League game last night.
It was the seventh straight loss
for the slumping Maple Leafs. The
defending Stanley Cup champions
are winless in the last nine games
and have won only once in the
last 12.
The Blues hopped into an early
2-0 lead on first period goals by
Sabourin and defenseman Mar-

clay Plager. Melnyk assisted on
Plager's goal.
Goalie Glenn Hall lost his shut-
out with about 3/z minutes left
in the game when Murray Oliver
scored Toronto's lone goal.
But the Blues got that right
back when Melnyk scored his sec-
ond goal of the night and 11th
of the season one minute later.

SCORES
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
West Virginia 87, Pitt 76
Louisville 86, Drake 80
Niagara 99, Buffalo 82
Toledo 95, Western Michigan 82
Dayton 91, Loyola (Chicago) 75
Citadel 84, William and Mary 73
Florida 89, Florida State 62
Davidson 106, Richmond 89
Cincinnati 85, Wichita State 81
at. John's (N.Y.) 58, Providence 56
North Carolina 83, Maryland 60
ABA
Dallas 122, Houston 119
Indiana 123. Denver 110

U

1 1

Professional Standings

A SHIRT'

NBA
Eastern Division

NHL

Philadelphia
xBoston
New York
Cincinnati
Detroit
Baltimore

w
49
44
34
31
30
29 37

Be-
L Pet hind
17 .742 -
20 .688 4
33 .507 15%
35 .470 18'
35 .462 18%
.439 '20 -

Montreal
Chicago
New York
Boston
Toronto
Detroit

East Division
W L T Pts
33 15 9 75
27 18 13 67
27 19 11 65
27 20 10 64,
23 24 9 55
20 27 10 50

GF
183
178
168
200
152
187
137
142.
149
133,
145
117

GA
119
167
153
170
134
193
136
172
181
137
166
163

Interviews at campus engineering
office on FEB. 22 and 23
"The Orlando, Florida, division of the Martin
Marietta Corporation is currently producing
SPRINT, PERSHING, WALLEYE, SHILLELAGH,
SAM-D, and AGM-12missile systems. An extensive
backlog of vital defense contracts provides
stability and professional growth opportunity."
If you are unable to schedule an
interview, please send resume directly
to: DIRECTOR OF COLLEGE RELATIONS
MARTIN MARIETTA CORPORATION
P.O. BOX 5837, ORLANDO, FLORIDA 32805
Marti MarT MnqAl pprETY r.4
Martin Marietta is an equal opportunity employer.

HAS THE ANSWER
Graduating Engineering Students,soon you will select
a full time employer. You may have offers from dozens
of company recruiters; but, before you make your
selection consider CESSNA AIRCRAFT COMPANY.
Since the first flight in 1911 to the present day, Cessna
has expanded its operations into nearly every part of
the world, and has become the world's leader in the
manufacture of light commercial aircraft. Cessna
Engineers operate with a minimum of red tape,
designing and developing a concept-then following
it through production to the consumer. Cessna helps
you grow professionally, by offering a college tuition
aid program, making it possible for Cessna Engineers
to work toward graduate degrees in Aeronautical,
Electrical, Mechanical, Industrial Engineering, or
Business. And numerous other fringe benefits
including an inexpensive membership in the Cessna
Employees Flying Club.
ACT NOW! And learn the complete Cessna story before you
make a decision. Send your resume to: Sam Williamson, Em-
ployment Supervisor; Cessna Aircraft Company, Commercial
Aircraft Division, 5800 East Pawnee Road, Wichita, Ks. 67201.
AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER

.L Western Division
St. Louis 46 22
xLos Angeles 37 37
San Francisco 39 29
Chicago 24 43
Seattle 19 47
San Diego 15 53
x--Late game not included.

.676
.578
.574
.358
.288
.224

7
7
21
26
30/2

Western Division
Philadelphia 25 23 9 59
Minnesota. 22 24 10 54
Los Angeles 24 28 5 53
St. Louis: ,, 1 24 11' 53
Pittsburgh 20 2710 50
akland, 13 33 11. 37

with dry cleaning

'I

Last Night's Results,
Chicago 105, Seattle 106
Baltimore 126, San Francisco 117
Boston at Los Angeles, night
Today's Games
Baltimore vs. Cincinnati at Cleve-
land
Detroit vs. St. Louis at Syracuse,
N.Y.

Yesterday's Results
Montreal 7, New York 2
St. Louis 5, Toronto 1
Philadelphia 1, Pittsburgh 1
Boston at Minnesota, inc.
Chicago at Oakland, inc.
Today's Games
St. Louis at Montreal
Boston at Detroit
Minnesota at Philadelphia

740 Packard

L

U

I

WHO
WILL

I

BE
MISS
WILDI
WILD
WEST

ANNOUNCING
THE WINTER ISSUE OF
generation
the inter-arts magazine
featuring:
Peggy Brase Michael Madigan
Steve Daniels Ronald Rosenblatt
William Du Charme Rosalind Stone
Jan Geasler Judy Stonehill
John Kolars Joyce Winslow

THE DETROIT PRESS
CLUBFOUNDATION
Annual Undergraduate Awards Competition
If you're a student at any Michigan college or university and have had any of
your work published in any media in 1967, you're eligible to enter.
Clip and paste no more than two of your published works on 812 x 1112 sheets.
Bind them in cardboard or a looseleaf notebook of about the same size. Include
the date and name of the publication for each entry, the category entered (News
Reporting, Feature Writing or Expression of Opinion), and mail to: Screening
Committee, Detroit Press Club Foundation, 516 Howard Street, Detroit, Michi-
gan 48226. All entries must be received before March 11, 1968.
16 AWARDS TOTALING $3,000.00
Five cash awards each are given for excellence of news reporting, excellence in
feature writing, and excellence in expression of opinion.
First prize in each category is $350.00, second prize $200.00, third prize $100.00
and two honorable mentions of $50.00 each.
PLUS A $750 GRAND PRIZE TO THE STUDENT WHOSE
WORK IS JUDGED OUTSTANDING AMONG ALL ENTRIES
The screening committee and final judging take into consideration the initiative

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