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February 22, 1968 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-02-22

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PAGE SIB'

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY. FMRiIARV 22. 1 AAA

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FAGE SIX TUE MICHIGAN DAILY TTCTTTR5~DAV I~RDTTAPV 99 1O~W

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SENIORS
LAST CHANCE
To Buy Announcements
For April Graduation}
TODAY and FRIDAY?
Lobby Desk
Administration Buildings
TODAY and FRIDAY{
Halls, West Engin.
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Deferment Suspensions Boost
Opposition to Selective Service

By PHIL SEMAS
WASHINGTON (CPS)-Genera
Hershey continues to be a big hel
to the anti-draft movement.
Last fall he helped consolidat
opposition to the draft with hi
recommendation that local draf
boards reclassify and induct anti
war protesters as soon as possible
That order resulted in three col
lege presidents, not normall
thought of as a major force in th
anti-draft movement, bar campu
rhilitary recruiters until Hershey
rescinded his order. It saw th

National Student Association, not since June 1967, and now for grad-
3l at all a militant anti-draft organ- uate students. Most occupational
p ization, join with Students for a deferments are also out.
Democratic Society, one of the What's more, unless President
e most militant, in a suit against Johnson changes the policy of
s Hershey. And, in general, it drafting the oldest first, students
t strenghtened the case against the will be going into the army as soon
- draft as unjust, unfair, and ar- as they graduate.
. bitrary. Easier to Handle
- Now General Hershey-and the That displeases the Army, which
y Administration he represents- would rather have younger, less
e have given a much bigger boost to educated draftees who are easier
s the anti-draft and anti-war move- to handle, and pleases opponents
y ment: they've taken away grad- of the war, who see more student
e uate deferments. action refusing to be inducted.
Serious Effect Even before this latest order,
Although most people have so SDS was planning a major anti-
far been pointing to the decision's draft campaign among seniors and
unquestionably serious effect on first-year graduate students this
graduate education and the na- spring. With no graduate defer-
tion's skilled manpower needs, the SDS will step up that effort
most important political impact of and sees much greater chances of
the order is more likely to be an success, now that students can no
upsurge in student activity against longer hope to keep the draft at

mmmmme

PETITIONS

for positions on the 1969
MICHIGANENSIAN x
ARE NOW AVAILABLE ON THE Fl RST FLOOR
STUDENT PUBLICATIONS BLDG. 420 MAYNARD
IN THE YEARBOOK OFFICE.

the war and especially against the
draf t.
It has long been a goal of such
groups as SDS to see an end to all
student deferments. SDS has right-
ly argued that such deferments are
unfair. But SDS's basic reason for
wanting deferments ended is that
they "cushion" students against
the impact of the war.
Privileged Status
Although students are more
likely to oppose the war than other
draft-age youth, their opposition
is likely to be less active because
their privileged draft status means
the war does not touch them di-
rectly. Opposition to the war is
strongest on college campuses, but
anti-draft workers have reasoned
that it would be even stronger if
students lost their privileged draft

bay through graduate deferments.
The first test of this impact will
come April 20-30 when draft re-
sistance groups have planned theirI
third anti-draft week. The first.
last October, was fairly successful,
with several hundred men turning
in draft cards. The second pretty
much flopped except for a big
demonstration in Boston. This
third effort, drawing on students'
discontent with the war and the
greater likelihood of their being
drafted, could be the most suc-
cessful yet.
Reach New High
Other war opponents have also
called for a national student strike
against the war during that period.
Earlier this strike had scant
chances of success. Now, with

-Associated Preas T
BERLINERS BURN SOVIET FLAG
Demonstrators burned a Soviet flag yesterday in front of the Berlin City Hall after an anti-leftist
rally. 150,000 attended the mass meeting to counter an anti-American demonstration that took
place last weekend.
FEAR OF COMPUTERS:
'U' Professor Attacks Johnson's
Proposed Right Of Privacy Act

a

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1

status.many more stuents eelg en- CHICAGO - The Johnson Ad-
Undergraduates still have defer- eral Hershey's hot breath on their ministration's proposed Right of
ments but their chances of parlay- necks, it seems likely to draw more Privacy Act does little to allay the
ing an undergraduate deferment participation. fear that unthinking electronic
into further deferments and even- During the summer of course, computers may make public con-
tual exemption are now much slim- graduating seniors will begin to get fidential records about American
mer than they were a year ago. the call and will have to decide citizens, a University professor
In the past two years the govern- whether or not to go in the mili- said recently.
ment has taken away deferments tary. At that time opposition to Prof. Arthur R. Miller of the
for husbands, for fathers who the draft and the war should Law School told a national sym-
have held a student deferment reach a new high. posium on privacy at the Univer-
3omoc > oc~oc sity of Chicago that "the com-
puter, with its insatiable appetite
for information, its image of in-
fallibility, its inability to forget
INDIA ART SHOP anything that has been put into
it, may become the heart of a sur-
1B d aveillance system that will turn so-
Indian and Persian Bedspreads, ciety into a transparent world."
Numdah Rugs, Pillows, and Miller, a frequent critic of the
y proposed national data center,
leveled his first attack at the
a a ingsFreedom of Information Act
0 = which went into effect last year.
c 330 Maynard (adjacent to carport) "That dubious statute," he said,
"requires disclosute of a number
I c o<_->t<-e<- <: -<--cacc>e_<- 0<>0<->0<of broad categories of government
records to any person."
The proposed Right of Privacy
Act, he said, fails to come to grips
Subscribe T 0 with the problems thus posed. In
the computer area it would pro-
I tect against transmissions by
wire, but not microwave relay
systems. And it would not deal
with problems of Information
Call 764-0558 gathering and processing or with
direct instructions on the com-
puter systems themselves.

The existing Freedom of Infor-
mation Act, Miller noted, was
passed "in furtherance of the
public's right to know - a mar-
velous cliche effectively manipu-
lated by the mass communica-
tions media."
But it may have the effect "of
forcing disclosure of a great deal
of information that originally
was given the government with
the understanding that it would
be kept confidential, and a con-
siderable amount of personal data
that many a sensitive citizen
would consider private."
The act, he said, represented a
"complete reversal of our past
presumption in favor of privacy"
in that it requires disclosure of
personal data within specified
categories "unless it would consti-
tute a clearly unwarranted in-
vasion of personal privacy."
If individual privacy is to be
given any meaningful protection
against the computer, Miller as-
serted, "it must be available at
the point of information gather-
ing. The key is appropriate limi-

tations on input" rather than the
development of legal remedies
after the fact.
"What is essential is the devel-
opment of a comprehensive set of b
rules of information gathering,
disclosure and confidentiality, as
well as legislative standards of
care for information processing
that will supplant, to the extent
feasible, the existing crazy-quilt
of regulations and fill the existing
statutory gaps."
Miller called on Congress to es-
tablish "reasonably precise stand-
ards regarding the information
that a federal data center can re-
cord . . . Information gathered
without specific Congressional
authorization should be denied
access to a data center."
And without an absolutely over-
powering demonstration that the
preservation of sensitive highly
personal information is essential
to national policy, "the data
should be permitted to be lost to
man's memory or simply be re-
tained on a decentralized confi-
dential basis."

REGISTER TO VOTE
NOW thru MARCH 1
ANN ARBOR CITY HALL
Vote QUENON for Council

14

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