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February 21, 1968 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-02-21

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WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 18+68

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SEVEN

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1968 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE SEVEN

Garishly-Dressed

Illini

Whip

Punchless

Cagers

By BILL LEVIS
Wearing the worst looking uni-
forms since Tennessee invaded
Yost Field House with orange
phosphorescent attire two years
ago, Illinois defeated a beleagured
Michigan quintet 72-64 last night
in the Events Building.
The Illini's Blue wardrobe had
clashing orange numerals that
were incredibly large. The uni-
forms also seemed to bother the
Wolverines as they lost- their
eighth Big Ten game in 10 starts.
Michigan, down by as much as
seven points in the second half,
crept to within one point, 65-64
with two minutes left in the
game.. The Illini streaked for sev-
en straight points the rest of the
way as Rudy Tomjanovich was
called for two offensive goaltend-
ing violations.
After Price
After Mike Price's free throw
upped the score to 66-64, Michi-
gan came storming down the
court. Bob Sullivan, who led the
belated charge with eight points,
missed a shot from the right side.
Tomjanovich went up and tipped
it in. He was clearly above the
rim however, and was called for
goaltending.
The Illini added another free
throw and then Tomjanovich was
' called for his second goaltending
violation in less than a minute
and his third in the ball game.
This time the call was question-
able but the Wolverines had been
drained of their fight by the de-
cision.
Illinois started to pull away.
Price, who hadn't hit a bucket
all night, added insult to injury,
sinking a jumper from the right
corner as the buzzer sounded.
Hellish
"Those two goaltending calls
were really hellish but I thought
they were right," said a relieved
Illinois coach Harv Schmidt after
the game.
"Tomjanovich was clearly on
top of the rim and the rules say
you can't be in that cylinder. Still,
they were really gutty caits by
the refs," added Schmidt
Michigan head coach Dave
Strack disagreed with the calls
but wouldn't blame the refs. "We
werejust not quite as sharp to-
night."
The Wolverines had trouble

-Daily-Thomas R. Copi
BOB SULIVAN banks in another impossible shot from a typically
ridiculous angle. He didn't have much success last night as shown
by his scoring total-eight 'points. Nobody scored too many for

The game, which ended much
like Michigan's 99-92 loss to Ohio
State several Saturdays ago, in-
cluded 43 fouls, 25 in the first
half
The close calling was not the
rain probem for Strack's qu'u-
tet. however. "We turned over the
ball too many times, and we
didn't jam the backboard," be
ernphasized.
Hurting
"Illinois was hurting us going
over the top of our boys on their
shots.'
While the Illini only outre-
bounded the Wolverines by one,
they were hitting the boards when
it mattered most.
There was one bright spot in
the debacle for the Wolverines,
however. Sophomore guard Mark
Henry went in for starter Ken
Maxey, after the junior picked up
his third foul in the first half.
Henry sparked the Wolverines to
within two of the Illini at half
time, 33-31.
Down by Seven
The Wolverines were down by
seven, 27-20, with five minutes re-
maining but came back to tie the
Illini at 31-31 as Dennis Stewart
hit both free throws on a one and
one situation.;
But Illinois went into the dress-
ing room at half time with a two
point edge as Les Busboom
stormed down the court and put
in a layup while Michigan' looked
on helplessly at the other end of
the court.
Stewart led the Wolverines in
scoring with 19, swishing through
most of his two pointers from the
outside. Jim Pitts, who hit on four
straight free throws, finished the
game with 18.
Big Surprise
Pace, who went into the game
with a five point average, was the
biggest surprise for the Illini, hit-
ting for 17 points.
"He was beautiful," Schmidt
praised.
It was his first start this season.
Dave Scholz led Illinois with 18
points "but he didn't have one of
his better games. Tomjanovich
played a good game keeping him
away from the basket," conclud-
ed Schmidt.

*

*

*

*

*

Ohio State Leap frogs Back into First

By The Associated Press
COLUMBUS, Ohio-Ohio S
hitting 13 of its first 17
from the field, defeated N
western Tuesday night 87-67
vaulted back into first plac
the Big Ten basketball race.
Big Bill Hosket, drilling it
first seven baskets, topped
scorers with 23 points in lea
the Buckeye attack. Team
Dave Sorenson contributed
points and reserve Ed Sr
starting his first game of the
son, chipped in 15.
The hot-shooting Buckeyes
19-13 midway through the
half, but outscored the Wil(
12-3 in the next four minut(
take a 31-16 lead.

tate,
shots
orth-
and
e in
n his
all
%ding
mate
22
mith,

The Wildcats fought back be-
hind the scoring of Terry Gamber
and cut the deficit to 36-27 at in-
termission.
But the Buckeyes spurted again
with 13 points to Northwestern's
5 in the opening 51/2 minutes of
the second half to break the game
wide open with a 49-32 cushion.
' *
MSU Stops Indiana

But the Spartans then moved game with 1:30 remair.Ang when he
out to a 10-point lead. 67-57, in the suffered a cramp in his left leg.
next four minutes and were never The cramp was reportedly tem-
headed thereafter. porary.

* * *

Michigan yesterday.
getting untracked all night. Mich-
igan was so lethargic in the early
stages of the game that the only
sound that could be heard
throughout the building was that
of the ventilation system.
The silence of the crowd ap-
peared to put the Wolverines to
sleep. Playing against a deliberate
Illinois team that leads the Big
Ten in defense with a 64 points-
against average, Michigan was
only able to hit for 31 in the first
half.
Big Gun?I
And the Wolverine's big gun,
Tomjanovich, could only hit for
six points in the half and eight
in the game.
"(Randy) Crews did a fantas-
tic job on him," a joyful Schmidt
said after the game. "He has held
Rudy to 20 points in two ball
games."
Schmidt was particularly happy
with the win since the Wolverines
had handed his Fightin' Illini a
stunning 67-65 defeat at home.

"We were awful sloppy out
there but I don't care how we win
them on t'le read," he noted.
"We really needed that one. I,
was afraid that Michigan beating'
us at home screwed up our whole
season." Illinois, now 5-4 in the ;
conference, lost three straight be- '
fore last night's victory.
The game, which included a'
near fight between Dave McClei-
lan and the Illini's Denny Pace
late in the second half, was
marred by sloppy play by both
teams. There were 41 turnovers1
in all.
"I'd have to say that the turn-
overs were the whTole difference,"
moaned Strack. "We gave the ball
up 25 times to their 16. And you,
have to figure about a point per!
turnover."
The Wolverines turned the ball
over nine more times than the;
Illini and lost by eight.

MIL
Tomjanovich, f
Stewart, f
Sullivan, c
Maxey, g
Pitts, g
Henry, g
Edwards, c
Fraumann, C
McClellan, f
TOTALS
IL
Crews, f 3
Louis, I
Scholz, c I
Pace, g ;
Harrison, g
Price, g
Busboom, f, g
TOTALS

CHIGAN
FG FT
3-9 2-2
7-16 5-61
4-12 0-2
0-1 1-1
6-15 6-10
3-4 2-3
0-0 0-0
0-0 0-0
1-3 0-0
24-60 16-24

P
8
10
4
3
6
0
0
3
E38

R
1
4
2
5
3
3
1
1
21

sea- EAST LANSING - Harrison
Stepter pumped in 20 points to
s led lead Michigan State to 75-70 Big
first Ten college basketball victory over
dcats Indiana yesterday.
es to The Spartans, now 4-5 in the'
conference and 10-9 over-all, tied
Indiana, which has an identical
conference mark, for sixth placej
T in the league. Indiana is now 9-10
1s for the season.j
8 Stepter hit on nine of 16 field
1 goals and two of five free throws
18 before fouling out with 22 seconds
8
0 left in the game. He had 13 in, the
0 first half. Lee Lafayette and Ber-
64 nie Copeland backed Stepter's per-
formance with 17 points each.
T Indiana's Verne Payne led all
16 scorers for the night with 21
2 points. Payne was held to only two
18 points in the first half and all but
12 singlehandedly brought Indiana
12 back from 38-28 halftime deficit.
4i
72 Indiana crept to within three
64 7 points, 47-44, on Payne's outside
42 shots and then tied the score at
55-55 with 6:12 remaining.

Purdue Stomps Iowa
LaFAYETTE - Purdue leaned
heavily on the shooting of sopho-
more guard Rick Mount in a Big
Ttn victory over Iowa 86-73 last
night.
Mount scored 38 points, only two
of them from the free throw line,
to pace the Boilermakers i and
knock Iowa out of the Big Ten
lead.
The lead changed hands five
times in the first half and ended
with Purdue ahead at the inter-
mission, 36-33
Top scorers for the Hawkeyes
were Chad Calabria with 19 points,
and Sam Williams with 18.
Mount was pulled out of the

Ohio State
Iowa
Purdue
Northwestern
Wisconsin
Illinois
Michigan State
Indiana
Minnesota
MICHIGAN

w
7
6
6
6
5
S5
4
3
3
2

L
3
3
3
4
4
4
5
6
7
8

Pet
.700
.667
.667
.600
.555
.555
.444
.333
.300
.200

*

LINOISFT RP
FG FT R P
3-12 10-14 11 3
1-2 0-0 1 2
8-22 2-2 10 2
7-12 3-4 5 3
5-5 2-4 2 4
1-5 2-4 2 4
2-2 0-1 2 5
27-60 18-28.39 22

Big Ten Standings

Yesterday's Results
Illinois 72, MICHIGAN 64
Ohio State 87, Northwestern
67
Purdue 86, Iowa 73
Michigan State 75, Indiana 70

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MICHIGAN
Illinois
Attendance: 6,304)

31 33-6
33 39-7

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U.M. LACROSSE CLUB
MASS MEETING
for '68 Spring Season
TONIGHT at 8:30
RM. NO. 131 - BUS. AD BLDG.
NEW AND INTERESTED PEOPLE ARE INVITED

YOU OWE IT TO YOURSELF to find out more about the challenging
opportunities that await you at UOP.
Visit with the UOP representative at your Placement Office on February
I22, 1968.

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Events Building Dedication Set
For Next Basketball Contest

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Formal dedication of the Uni-1
versity's new Events Building willt
be held between halves of thez
Michigan-Purdue basketball game,c
Tuesday, Feb. 27. Game time willt
be 8 p.m.l
Big Ten faculty representatives
and athletic directors will join
w i t h University Regents, the
Board in Control of Intercollegiate
Athletics, student and "M" Club
representatives and others in the
half-time ceremony.
Speaking briefly will be Univer-
sity President Robben W. Fleming,
with other remarks by Prof. Mar-
cus L. Plant, NCAA president and
Michigan's faculty representative,
along with Paul Goebel, represent-
ing the Regents and Donald F.
Tucker of Jackson, president of
the Michigan Union and Univer-
sity Activities Center, representing
the student body.
Athletic Director H. O. (Fritz)
Crisler, under whose direction the
$7,200,000 multi-purpose building
was begun, will introduce mem-
bers of the Athletic Board. Master
of Ceremonies will be Bill Flem-
ming, Class of '49, commentator
on ABC's Wide World of Sport,
who will introduce the guests.
A press reception and dinner will
SPORTS NIGHT EDITOR:
PATRICIA ATKINS

precede the game with guided
tours of the building as an after-
noon feature, and a half hour
concert by the University Band{
under the direction of Prof. Wil-
liam D. Revelli will follow the
basketball game.

BOOK SALE
9c up
Books of all! kinds

Heard around
Campus!
.i. it is more interesting
to work for
AEIIOJET
See your placement
off ice tod y for
interview arrangements.

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--- -- - -

v.

The Michigan Interfraternity Council
Wishes To Congratulate
The New Officers of tie Ponhellenic Council:
PRESIDENT: ELLEN HEYBOER
VICE PRESIDENT: KAREN LOWE
TREASURER: LOUISE BOWEN
SECRETARY:: CAROL GARDNER
PUBLIC RELATIONS: NANCY MAMMEN
PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: WENDY KRESS
CULTURAL CONCERNS: CAROL ROSENTHAL
ALUMNAE RELATIONS: PAT DISHUCK
SPECIAL PROJECTS: DIANE MURPHY
RUSH CO-ORDINATOR: MARY TEAHAN
BEST OF LUCK IN THE COMING YEAR!

WA R'S
316 S. State NO 2-5669

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