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February 20, 1968 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-02-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TUESDAYFEBRUARY20, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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,. _ _ .__ _ sv _ _ ~_

PAUL A* XL~E

Olympic Games End;
Controversy Flares

Cagers Host Vengeful Illin ois

By BILL McFAL

L

qpl_-- 1

R NQBLE, France MP)-The
Winter Olympics, beset by injury
and warm weather, ended in con-
troversy and anger, and possibly
set the stage for more of the same
at the Summer Olympics next
October.
The administrative antics off
the ice and snow all but over-
shadowed the athletes and such
performances as Jean-Claude Kil-
ly's sweep of men's Alpine skiing,
Eugenio Monti's two victories in
the bobsleds and a pair of gold
medals for Toini Gustafsson in the
women's cross-country skiing.
However, it did not shake U.S.
pride in skaters Peggy Fleming,
Terry McDermott, Tim Wood,
Diane Holum, Jenny Fish and.
Mary Meyers, nor its disappoint-.
ment in - the -"injury-prone U.S.
-skiers and the hockey team. In all,
the United States finished with one'
gold medal, five silver and one
bronze-a total of seven, one more
than in 1964.
Flame Extinguished
The Games officially closed Sun-
day night in traditional cere-,
monies at the Grenoble ice rink
and the extinguishing of the
Olympic flame, which burned for
12 days and nights for 37 coun-
tries. It will be relit in Mexico
City and more countries will be
represented as usual, for the Sum-
mer' Games. But a number who
normally woulducompete now look
doubtful.
A bloc of predominantly Negro
African nations have pulled out,
* protesting an International Olym-

pic Committee decision to allow
South Africa with its apartheid
policy of segregation to participate
with an integrated team.
There also is some fear of a
Russian pullout after the Soviet
Union denounced the IOC decision.
"Without Russia the Olympics
Games would still be the Olympic
Games," said Frank Braun, presi-
dent of the South African Olympic
Association. "In any case, I cannot
see Russia withdrawing-not with
all those medals at stake."
Not a Chance
He added that there is "not a
ghost of a chance of us withdraw-
ing" as an. act of self sacrifice
should Russia withdraw.
And while that turmoil bubbled,
Austria and Karl Schranz still
raged over Killy's victory in the
special slalom by default Saturday.

A week ago, the Michigan 1le L
basketball squad traveled to
Champaign-Urbana to meet a ILLINOIS
team The Daily called the "Sur- Randy Crews F
prising Illini." Mike Pierce F
During that game, many amaz- Dave Scholz C
ing things happened. Les Busboom G
1) The "surprising" became the Jodie Harrison G
"surprised."
2) The vaunted Illinois defense
couldn't compensate for their be a bit diminished following last
me) offense.. t Saturday's anemic performance
3) The Wolverines won their against ninth-place Indiana in
first conference road game in aantnnhpaeIdaaI
eons. which the Hoosiers romped all over.
eons
4iThe Wolvrines alson sur- .ism2115%iilsn~nsal%1121%2ml~i.

Alleip s

I

-Associated Press,
THE LOWERING OF THE FLAGS at Grenoble mark the end
of the controversial 1968 winter Olympic games. The games were
highlighted by the spectacular performance of France's Jean
Claude Killy, and the upset victory for Norway in the overall
medal standings.

41
NATIONAL RATINGS:
SHouston Remains On Top; Bonnies Climb

prised everyone by winning their
second Big Ten contest this year.
Why Us?
Following this astounding series
of events, 8,850 bewildered patrons
filed out of Assembly Hall won-
dering: "why us?."
Tonight, there will be 17,700
ears pressed close to radios as the
Fighting Illini pay a return visit
to get revenge.
Hopefully, there will be just as
many hands applauding the Wol-
verines to their third Big Ten
win when they take the floor at
8:00 p.m. in the Events Building.
SCORES
College
Kentucky 10)6, Georgia 87
Louisiana state 94, Miss. St. 83
St. Bonaventure 97, Creighton 84
Vanderbilt 89, Alabama 74
Loyola, Chi. 83, Bowling Green 74
Oklahoma 71, Colorado 68
Syracuse 85, Pitt 71
Mississippi 57, Auburn 56
Nebraska 82, Oklahoma St. 73.
Virginia 10u), wake Forest 87
Rutgers 64, Gettysburg 63
Waynesburg 63, Frostburg 60

MICHIGAN
Rudy Tomjanovichl
Dennis Stewart
Bob Sullivan
Ken Maxey
Jim Pitts
Jodie Harrison, who scored 16 and
15 points, respectively.
Coach Dave Strack will oppose
them with his regular starting
five, perhaps spelling them off
with senior Mark Henry, who did
well against Illinois in a sub-
stitute defensive role, and sopho-
mores Bill Fraumann and Rich
Bloodworth, Also a good bet to see
action is Dave McClellan.
If Michigan can come up with
a repeat performance of a week
ago, when they showed hot hands
by pouring in 48.3 per cent from
the field, the Illini might just be
'surprised' into being the only
team that gets a double-drubbing
by the Michigan cagers.

Tonight's Michigan - Illinois
basketball game will be broad-
cast starting at 8:00 over WCBN,
WAAM, and WUOM FM.
a battling Maize-and-Blue quin-
tet, finally taking it, 98-92.
Leading the return charge of
the irate Illini will be center
Dave Scholz, who wasbhigh in
last week's game with 18 points,
along with Randy Crews and

Dave Scholz

Big Ten Standings

The Houston Cougars, still a
solid leader in The Associated
Press' major-college basketball
poll, should have no trouble ex-
tending their unbeaten streak
this week.
The Cougars, 23-0, take on two
small-college teams. They meet the
University of Texas at Arlington
on Thursday and Valparaiso Sat-
urday. Texas at Arlington has
won only three of 21 games while
Valparaiso has a 10-11 record.

Dewey Heads for MSU

Houston received 26 first-place
votes and 332 points in the latest
poll based on games through last
Saturday. In the voting by a na-
tional panel of 34 sports writers
and broadcasters, points were
awarded on a basis of 10 for a
first-place vote, 9 for second, etc.
UCLA, 20-1, held second place.
The Bruins had the eight other
votes for the top position and 314
points.
Houston beat Miami, Fla. and
Air Force while UCLA defeated
Oregon State and Oregon last
week.
For extra-
curricular
activities.

North Carolina, 20-1, remained:
in the No. 3 spot followed by un-
beaten St. Bonaventure. The Bon-
nies scored their 18th triumph
last week, 81-71 over Seton Hall
1. Houston (26) 23-0 332
2. UCLA (8) 20-1 314
3. North Carolina 20-1 266
4. St. Bonaventure 18-0 232
5. Kentucky 17-4 149
6. Columbia 17-3 129.
7. New Mexico 20-2 123
8. Duke 16-3 102
9. Vanderbilt 17-4 95 t
10. Marquette 18-3 25

Iowa
Ohio State
Northwestern
Purdue
Wisconsin
Illinois
Michigan State
Indiana
Minnesota
'MICHIGAN

w
6
6
5
5
4
3
3
3
2

L
2
3
3
3
4
4
5
5
7
7

Pct
.750
.667
.667
.625
.556
.500
.375
.375
.300
.222

Today's Games
Iowa at Purdue
Northwe sternat Ohio State
Indiana at Michigan State
Illinois at Michigan

_______ I

S.G.C.
Does the virginity of
every girl in the state
really depend on it?
on sole Wed., Feb. 21

The "first phase" of a Big Ten',
Investigation,,into apparent rule'
violations by Michigan athletes
will end today, John D. Dewey,
assistant conference commission-
er and ,examiner, said last night.
"I will interview a few more
Michigan athletes in the morn-
ing, and then leave for East Lan-
sing In the afternoon," Dewey
told The Daily. "I have already
fixed plans for an investigation
at Michigan- State."

Dewey will be checking into
similar apparent infractions of
Big Ten regulations by MSU ath-
letes.
He indicated, however, that
there is still more work to be done
at Michigan. "I can't say when
I'll be back to Ann Arbor," he
stated, "I have to type up the
interviews of athletes, coaches
and townspeople, and see if there
is any difference of information."

Martin
Marietta
Careers

After graduation, what?
Will1 you. begin your career as an
engineer or scientist or return to
school for an advanced degree?

You candoboth atNOL
If you are an engineer in the top third of your class or a scientist
in the top quarter of your class, NOL offers you the opportunity
to begin your career in one of the world's great laboratories and,
at the same time, go ahead with your plans for graduate study.

Interviews at campus engineering-
officeon FEB. 22 and 23
"The Odando;Florida, division of tne Martin
MariettaCorporationis currently producing
SPRINT, PERSHING,;WALLEYE, SHILLELAGH,
SAM-D, and AGM-12 rnissile systems. Anextensive
backlog .of.vital defense contracts provides
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If you are unable to schedule an
interview, please send resume directly
to: DIRECTOROF.COLLEGE RELATIONS
MARTIN MARIETTA CORPORATION
P.O. BOX 5837, ORLANDO, FLORIDA 32805
Ma In Ma oIE mlyr
Martin Marietta is an equal opportunity employer.

BRITISH
STERLING
So fine a gift,
It's even sold
in jewelry stores.
After shave
from $3.50.
Cologne
from $5.00.
Essential oPs Imporied from Great Britain.
Compit'rrld in 1U SA.

f
I

From the very beginning, new staff members have an oppor-
tunity to contribute directly to significant projects .. . to
be part of an organization where groups are small and
emphasis is on the individual.
NOL offers you a graduate study program that is one of
the largest and most productive programs in the country.
Each year members of our professional staff receive M.S.'s
or Ph.D.'s through this program. NOL has a significant ad-
vantage in its proximity to the University of Maryland. Many
NOL staff members hold permanent part-time positions on
the Maryland faculty, and graduate level courses are taught
at NOL every semester. Maryland also offers many courses
on its own campus-only minutes away-at times which

site systems, instrumentation for weapons evaluation and
aeroballistics research, and performance of new concept
feasibility experiments.
Chemical Engineers and Chemists-for research and devel-
opment pertaining to high-energy propellants and explo-
sives; high polymers; molecular and crystal structures;
electrochemistry; high-temperature, high-pressure chemical
equilibrium studies; and the thermddynamics of high-
energy reactions.
Engineering Physicists and Physicists-theoretical and ex-
perimental research in a wide range of areas including
signal processing, infrared radiation, acoustics, magnetic
and semi-conductive materials, and detonation physics;
plus weapon systems development and studies.

are convenient to;
of NOL

and keyed to the special requirements

NOL ACADEMIC STUDY PROGRAMS

P?GRAM

COMPETITION

ADMITTANCE

SUPPORT

I

NO. is a laboratory in the true meaning of the word, and
one of the largest and best-equipped laboratories in the
world. It is the nation's leading R&D establishment for
Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW), the Navy's principal high
speed aeroballistics activity, and a leader in the develop-
ment of new air and surface weapons. The spectrum of
research at NOL ranges from nuclear effects to acoustics
to explosives and materials. At NOL, weapons development
is carried through from inception to design to prototype
test and development. Since 1950, NOL has completed 209
new weapons and devices such as SUBROC, nuclear depth
bombs, mines, projectile fuzes, underwater detection sys-
tems, and components and design data for POLARIS,
TARTAR, TALOS, TERRIER, ATLAS and TITAN missiles. A
civilian staff of over 3,000 people includes more than 1,000
professional engineers and scientists-experts with na-
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facilities embrace wind tunnels operating to Mach 17,
hypervelocity ballistic ranges, the world's most exceptional
hydroballistic facility, shock tunnels, 300g centrifuge .. .
multi-million-dollar experimental facilities.

Part-time Open to all Approval by Refund of tuition and fees if /
Graduate Study qualified line management. course grade is "B" or
employees, better... approx. 1/2 time plus
travel time for attendance.
Graduate Recent college graduates Selected by Personnel Full salary, tuition, books &
Work-Study in certain engineering & Officer ... admission to fees ... 2 days each week
scientific fields. local graduate school devoted to study and classes
for M.S. for 2 years maximum.
Intermediate Recent college graduates Selected by Personnel Full tuition, books, fees,
Graduate in certain engineering & Officer. .. admission to travel per diem & 1/2 GS-7
Study scientific fields. graduate school... an salary ... (over $3800)...
honors program. 2 semesters full-time.

Advanced
Graduate
Study

Scientists &
Engineers, grade
GS-11 and above.

Selected by NOL
Training
Committee.

Full tuition, books,
fees, travel, per
diem, & full salary
for 2 semesters.

NOL NEEDS:
Aerospace Engineers or Hydrodynamiists-design studies
of high-speed, high-performance re-entry systems, basic
problems in theoretical and experimental aerothermody-
namics, aeroballistics and hydroballistics; and aerodynamic
design and development of hypervelocity wind tunnels and

An NOL representative will be on campus ..
FEBRUARY 26, 1968
Contact your Placement Office for interview.
Summer Professional Employment . . . for outstanding
graduate students and graduating seniors.

2

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