100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 20, 1968 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-02-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1968 TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE TIK1~EE

Strike Paralyzes
Florida Schools
Teachers Label Funds Insufficient
For Competitive Programs, Wages

Communist REVISE ETHICS CODE:

Offensive

ABA Asks Limits on Reporting
Of Pending Court Proceedings

TALLAHASSEE, Fla., (P)-Much
of Florida's public school system
was paralyzed yesterday by an
unprecedented teacher walkout.
Organizers of the move claimed
more than 35,000 teachers stayed
away from their classrooms "de-
spite frantic threats of reprisal"
by school officials.
Leaders of the Florida Educa-
tion Association said early reports
showed 35,000 of the state's 60,000
W teachers attended mass rallies in-
stead of going to school.
Newspaper
*Unions Plan
Joint Picket
DETROIT (A) - All 14 unions
affected by Detroit's 9.6-day old
newspaper shutdown will mass
hundreds of pickets tomorrow in
a campaign to force the publish-
ers into bargaining with their un-
ion organization, instead of sepa-
rately, sources said yesterday.
"The publishers want to fall
back on the historic pattern of
negotiating with individual un-
ions, find a weak point and then
impose a pattern," one union of-
ficial said.
Total Campaign'
He said the picket lines will be
"part of a total campaign," im-
plying that one objective will be
to arouse public support for the
position of the unions.
Members of Teamsters Local 372
struck the News, an afternoon
paper, at midnight last Nov. 15 to
support demands for a new con-
tract.
Joint Contracts
Two days later the Free Press,
a morning publication, voluntarily
halted its presses and closed its
doors to most of its employes. The
paper said its action was in sup-
port of the News.
The Free Press .and News bar-
gain most of their union contracts
jointly, although not the ones
with the Teamsters.,
Meanwhile, State Sen. Robert J.
Huber said his Senate committee
investigating the shutdown will
suspend hearings for the next few
weeks.
"They're close to a settlement
and we don't want to bother
them," said Huber (R-Troy).
Huber said he expects the hear-
ings will resume "in about three
weeks."

"It would appear at this time
that the teachers of Florida have
successfully made their point," an
FEA statement said.
"We regret having to close
schools but it proved be the only
course left to the profession after
the politicians of this state failed
to meet their responsibilities to
the children.'
Classes Cancelled
All classes were cancelled in 22
counties with combined enrollment
of 556,155. The state's total public
school enrollment is 1,300,000.
Four other counties closed part
of their schools yesterday for lack
of teachers. Some that were open
yesterday announced plans to close
today, a few for the whole week.
Many of the schools that re-
mained open operated as baby sit-
ting facilities with movie programs
and singalongs.
At issue was a $254 million ed-
ucational package passed last week
by the legislature in a special ed-
ucational financing session called
by Gov. Claude Kirk.
The FEA contended the sum was
not sufficient to give the state a
first rate educational program and
provide adequate salaries.
Quality Education
FEA leaders insisted teacher pay,
which generally ranges from $4,0001
to $8,000 in Florida, was not the
main issue.
"We're not asking for anything
right now except for quality educa-
tion," said Don Pierce, assistant
executive secretary of Dade Miami
County's 8,400 member Classroom
Teachers Association.
The teachers, acting through
their professional organization, the
FEA, began the walkout after re-
jecting as insufficient last Friday
a legislative program for increas-
ing financial support to public
schools.
There was no picketing as most
of the teachers who resigned join-
ed in 21 mass meetings around the
state.'
The teachers say their resigna-
tions were legal and not in con-
flict with Florida's law barring
strikes by public employes, but an
aide to Gov. Claude Kirk said the
teachers were on strike.
Dr. Phil Constans, executive sec-
retary for the FEA and chief
spokesman for the teachers, said
yesterday 35;000 had stayed away
from their classrooms and would
not return until the Legislature
passes a bill acceptable to the
teachers-one that would give $267
million additional money to
schools not including construction.

Easing OffI
'Second Wave' Battle
Continues in Saigon;
Viet Cong Retain Hue
SAIGON (P) - The Viet Cong
slammed more rockets and mortars
into Saigon and a few other cities
yesterday, but the Communists'
"second wave" offensive appeared
to be easing off considerably in its!
second day.
However, some bursts of small
arms fire were heard in the streets
of Saigon itself early this morning.
One rocket hit a terminal at
Saigon's Tan Son Nhut Airport,
killing one U.S. serviceman and
wounding 21 as they waited with.
180 GIs to return home after a
year of duty.
Follow-up Attacks
The Communists hit 47 cities,
owns and military installations
with rocket and mortar barrages
Sunday in a follow up to their
Jan. 30 lunar new year offensive.
But they""aunched ground attacks
at only a few points.
One battle from the first of-
fensive still continues. U.S. Ma-
rines and South Vietnamese troops
are in the 20th day of their cam-
paign to root out Communist
troops entrenched in Hue's Citadel,
apparently for a fight to the last,
man.
In the northwest corner of the
country at Khe Sanh, enemy gun-
ners kept up their shelling of the

-Associated Press
FLORIDA TEACHERS' STRIKE LEADER Phil Constans, Execu-
tive Secretary of the Florida Education Association, relaxed yes-
terday after a news conference at which he explained the effect
of massive teacher walkouts onthe state,
McNAMARA PREDICTION:
Russians To Equal
U.S. Missile Force

CHICAGO (P)- The American
Bar Association adopted new
guidelines yesterday to limit what
the public will be told about pend-
ing criminal trials and arrests.
A plan by news executives for
a year's delay while new studies
were made was turned down by
the association's House of Dele-
gates by a vote of 176 to 68.
The controversial Reardon - re-
port was then adopted by voice
vote.
The proposals now will go to an
ethics committee which will blend
them in during a revision of the
ABA's Canons of Professional
Ethics.
Cut Down
Though they are recommenda-
tions, they are likely to swiftly
cut down what police will tell the
press about criminal cases and will
effectively limit what lawyers and
judges say outside the courtroom.
Just before the vote, Chief
Judge J. Edward Lombard of the
U.S. Circuit Court in New York
City told the delegates that if
they accede to the plea for de-
ferral, the news media would be
backenext year talking for still
further studies.
Speaking for the report, Wil-
liam T. Gossett, ABA president-
elect, said the guidelines "provide
the mildest, least restrictive, most
moderate steps possible to provide
a fair trial."
'Disappointed'
Theodore Koop, a CBS vice-
president representing various
news organizations, said he was
"naturally disappointed by the
decision.
"I personally feel the battle-
ground now shifts to the states
and depends on whether the
courts and legislatures adopt these
restrictions," he said.
- D. Tennant Bryan, publisher of
the Richmond, Va., Times-Dis-
patch and News Leader, represent-
ing the American Newspaper Pub-
lishers Association, said, "It
seems to me the House of Dele-

gates attempted to amend the
Constitution and I doubt that they
have that authority."
J. Edward Murray, managing
editor of the Arizona Republic,
speaking for the American So-
ciety of Newspaper Editors, said,
"Both free press and fair trial will
suffer as a result" of the ABA's
action.
The guidelines result from a,

study undertaken 39 months ago
by a special ABA trial-press com-
mittee headed by Justice Paul C,
Reardon of the Supreme Judicial
Court of Massachusetts.
In the main, they would pre-
vent the disclosure of information
about prior criminal records, con-
fessions or possible admissions of
guilt, and the results of such tests
as fingerprinting and lie detection.

WASHINGTON (iA) - Secretary
of Defense Robert S. McNamara+
says the Soviet Union may have3
as many land-based nuclear mis-1
siles as the United States by mid
1969.
It was the first time a Cabinet
officer has been known to set a1
timetable for when the Soviets
might catch up with the United
States in terms of land-launched,
ICBMs.
McNamara's disclosure of latest
intelligence projections -- based
largely on reconnaissance pho-
tography - means Russia is ex-
pectedto have over 1,000 ICBMs
in underground firing silos in
about 18 months.
He estimated they had 720 as
of last Oct. 1.
The United States has reached
its planned peak of 1,054 land
based missiles. But it plans to +
produce new ones which will car-
ry not one but three warheads
capable of striking different tar-
gets.
In a statement yesterday on the;
strategic situation, the Defense
Department said the Soviets "are!
unlikely to possess a total of land
and sea-based ICBM launchers
equal to ours until the latter part
of the 1970s, if then.".

U.S. Marine combat base. Ground
"We expect to maintain a ratio action halted after a weekend
of superiority in separately, tar- clash in which a Marine unit pa-
getable warheads of three or four trolling near the base reported
to one as far ahead as we now killing 26 enemy soldiers.
plan, i.e., for the next six td eight The steady pounding of sus-
years," the Pentagon said. pected enemy positions from the
Regardless of numbers, however, air continued around the base.
the Pentagon said, "the funda- There was fighting reported late
mental situation of mutual deter- yesterday at Phan Thiet, 90 miles
rents which has existed for sever- east of Saigon, where Communist
al years" between the U.S. and forces had seized part of the coast-
Russia remains unchanged. al city. A U.S. spokesman said an
In what amounted to a warn-, allied force was mopping up pock-
ing, the Pentagon said this coun- ets of resistance.
try will match Soviet strategic Ground Assault
moves as necessary. From the Mekong Delta city of
"The United States will not Vinh Long came sketchy reports
permit the Soviet Union to achieve of a ground assault yesterday that
a capability which will give the carried into the city center. U.S.
Soviet leaders any reason to be- spokesmen reported that the ca-
lieve that they can gain any ad- thedral had been "retaken" and
vantage by threatening the use that fighting had dwindled to
of nuclear weapons against either sporadic small arms fire.
the U.S. or its allies," the Penta- Just northeast of Saigon, bitter
gon said. fighting flared for the second day
The Defense Department spoke yesterday around the Binh Loi
of the Soviets' missile buildup as Bridge that leads into the capital
a reinforcement of their "second from the north.
strike capability. This implies that Another clash was reported
the administration believes the about three miles north of Tan
Soviet Union is only trying to im- Son Nhut air base, where repeated
prove its retaliatory capability fights have broken out since the
and not striving for the means to Communists launched their new
launm h a surnrise. first attack v r nffensive.

-Associated Press
GOP TO PLAN PLATFORM
At a Washington press conference yesterday, Gov. John H.
Chaffee of Rhode Island, chairman of the Republican Governors'
Association, announced plans for a series of hearings to develop
party campaign platforms for next fall's elections.
President and Mrs. Fleming
cordially invite you to
an Open House
on Feb. 20, 1968 4
from four until six o'clock
815 South University Avenue

C'MON GUYS & GIRLS!
NEED A DATE
FOR WINTER WEEKEND?
WE GOT 'EM!. .TRY AIDS
ACTION INSTANT DATING
SERVICE. (ONLY 75c)
TUES.. nd (Girls Free)
THURS. 7-10 663-3078

i

UNION-LEAGUE

IYL Ulltill [Ir 1S U1 /1 laG} llla LL ti Qrl+t].

y cat vaaa.awa r ..

The Dramatic Arts Center
OF ANN ARBOR
PRESENTS
COMMANDER CODY
AND THE LOST PLANET AIRMEN
AND GALACTIC TWIST QUEENS
CONCERT * PARTY * GALA
* BASH * ETC.
THIS WEDNESDAY NITE, 8:30 P.M.
50c
HIP GROOVERS ONLY!!!!

COMING AGAIN.
MARKET
SERVICE through which' you can
BUY-SELL-SUBLET
E OPEN MON-FRI., 3-5 P.M:
Call UAC offices, 662-4431, or drop in

PRESENTS
Strat/brb
National Theatre of Canada
SHAKESPEARE'S
"A Midsummer Night's Dream"
with

the Elves and
the Shoemaker
'r yRECOMMENDED
FOR CHILDREN
Ages 6 through 12
lay e
SATURDAY, FEB. 24,
10 A.M. & 2 P.M.
hildrer's SUNDAY, FEB. 25,
he o2 P.M.
in TRUEBLOOL THEATRE (State & Huron)
Please send check and order form below to
CHILDREN'S THEATRE, U-M DEPT. of SPEECH,
ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN 48104
r---~~------------------------------ ~~l
r "THE ELVES & THE SHO EM AKER" Perf -rmance
(I enclose $ for: (erf)m. nce
____ Children's Tickets (50c) Sat. 10

DOUGLAS RAIN MARTHA HENRY
as Bottom as Titania
Directed by JOHN HIRSCH Designed by LESLIE HURRY
SOLE U.S. ENGAGEMENT! 4-
Ar'nr il 1"A A pMnr-aPIl q-'hn Theatre

I

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan