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February 16, 1968 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-02-16

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FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE FIV

FRIDAY. FEBRUARY 16, 1968 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE FIVE

RIOT THREAT REMAINS:
Employment Program Draws
Out-of-State Jobless to Detroit;

DETROIT (P)-A massive indus- "We are cognizant of the fact
try effort to help avert future riots that there may be outside agita-
in Detroit appears to be backfiring tors coming in and we are keeping
as hundreds-possibly thousands- abreast of the situation. But that's
of jobless from out of state come as far as I care to comment right
to the city seeking work. now," says Inspector James Ban-
The result: Some out of staters non, head of police intelligence.
have failed to get a job, swelling The dramatic turn in the in-
the unemployment that many feel dustry campaign was revealed by
contributed to last July's devas- Joseph L. Hudson Jr., chairman of
tating riot, the New Detroit Committee.
Others have snapped up jobs The committee was set up by
that might have gone to the city's Mayor Jerome P. Cavanagh and
own so-called hardcore unem- Gov. George Romney to help re-
ployed. build the city after the rioting
These are people considered that killed 41 and caused more
most likely to join a riot and they than $80 million in damage.
were the original targets of the Hudson told a news conference
job campaign that has gotten na- Wednesday that word has spread
tionwide publicity. around the nation of the city's ef-
Police cite still another possible forts to create new jobs and that
problem. in influx of jobless has pushed un-
Negroes Protest In Georgia
Poor Conditions of Schools

SOCIAL CIRCLE, Ga. (P)-Negro
demonstrators, sprawling in front
of buses to protest what they
termed deplorable school condi-
tions, were dragged from a street
by helmeted state troopers yester-
day and taken to jail.
Major Porter Weaver of the
Georgia Department of Public
Safety said about 40 persons were
booked at the Walton County jail
in Monroe, 10 miles north of this
small community.
Weaver said they were charged
with refusing to obey a - lawful
order and obstructing traffic.
The protest centered around
conditions at the Social Circle
Training School, an all-Negro el-
ementary school. They said their
complaints include lack of sub-
stitute teachers, inadequate lunch-
room facilities and overcrowded
school buses.
After the arrests, a group of
0 about 20 Negroes went to the So-
cial Circle Public School-not in-
volved in the protest - and at-
tempted to enroll several Negroes.
They were turned back by state

troopers and S. W. Causey, the
superintendent and principal of
the city school.
Causey said the city school, in-
tegrated about two years;ago. cur-
rently has about 65 Negroes in its
enrollment of about 650 pupils.
"I told them that this was not
the time to change schools,"
Causey said. "I told them they had
the freedom of choice as to which
school their child would attend
last spring and they would have
that same opportunity later."
The demonstrators, numbering
fewer than 100, began gathering
shortly before 8 a.m. Then, as the
first school bus approached a few
minutes later, about 25 of them
scrambled into the street and
sprawled there.
The state troopers, most of
them in separate patrol cars just
behind the bus, swarmed from
their vehicles and dragged, pushed
and carried the demonstrators
from the street.
Two other incidents-all within
15 minutes-were treated in the
same fashion.
No injuries were reported.

employment to 31,000 compared to
the level of 30,000 last August.
Although some of this can be
traced to seasonal layoffs, Hud-
son pointed out.that 17 companies
asked to help provide jobs have
hired 55,000 people since Aug. 1.
Hudson said 45 per cent of these
were Negroes, including 10,000 to
15,000 considered hardcore un-
employables.
Job Publicity Responsible
Despite Hudson's comments, a
spokesman for the New Detroit
Committee said yesterday that
there are no plans to ask the com-
panies to tighten hiring policies
and at least two of the major
employers said they had no such
plans of their own.
"How can you keep these peo-
ple out?" said the spokesman.
"I know personally of one young
fellow from Cleveland who came
to Detroit because of the publicity
about jobs," said a Ford Motor Co.
spokesman. "But by the large most
of the people we have hired have
been from Detroit."
He said Ford has not taken any
steps to separate native job-seek-
ers from those from out of the
state.
"We hire anybody who shows up
at the gate," said a spokesman for
Chrysler Corp.
He said Chrysler also takes peo-
ple referred to it by civil rights
groups. General Motors Corp. also
works closely with such groups in
its hiring campaign.
"If they send them to us we
figure they're okay and we don't
care where they came from," said
the Chrysler spokesman.
Job Seekers Up
William Wilson, director of the
unemployment department of the
Detroit Urban League, said the
number of outsiders seeking jobs
through his office is up 12 per cent
over 1966.
Wilson said nonresidency is no
bar to employment referral. He
said a standardized form is given
to each applicant that includes a
question on how long the person
has been in Detroit.
If the answer indicates the per-
son just arrived, he is asked why
he came.

Fowler Backs LBJ
n Tax Surcharge
WASHINGTON (P)-A congres- cluded a substantial cut in the
sional alternative to the admin- budget and a 5 per cent surcharge
istration's 10 per cent tax sur- on corporations - none on indi-
charge got a cold shoulder yes- viduals.
terday from Secretary of the Proxmire also suggested a "mod-
Treasury Henry H. Fowler. est beginning" on tax reform. ex-
Fowler said higher taxes are tension of the automobile and
needed now to halt inflation and telephone excise taxes which are
prevent an eventual recession. scheduled to decline April 1, and
The Treasury chief testified be- a speedup in corporate tax col-
fore the Senate-House Economic lections. These latter two measures
Committee as the government re- havealready been requested b3
ported the first decline in indus- President Johnson.
trial output in four months dur- Politically Realistic
ing January and a slowdown in "This compromise," Proxmire
personal income gains, said, "seems to me to be political-
ly realistic and likely to get actior
Fowler, however, said the econ- much more swiftly than the tax
omy is in grave danger of exces- increase and it would have roughl3
sive overheating." the same effect."
Dollar Drain Proximre said $7.55 billion could
The Commerce Department also be cut from the budget in such
pinpointed the international dol- fields as public works, space and
lar drain last year at $3.57 billion, the supersonic transport.
the largest since 1960, and blamed Fowler, however, said he had
the deterioration on a poor trade no confidence from watching
picture and devaluation of the congressional debate that spend-
British pound. ing could be cut by $10 billion.
Sen. William Proxmire (D-Wis.), Proxmire said he was thinking
committee chairman and a sur- in terms of $7 billion of $8 billion
charge opponent, suggested a and if necessary Congress could
compromise on taxes which in- decree an over all spending limit.

and the
SATYRS
(Reprise records recording artsists)
would you believe BLUES with flute and harpsichord and things?!

80ri., sP., sun.
8:00 p.m.

$2.00 per person
$1.50 after second set

G]IITBNBUNY iOUSE

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JEREMY

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Ioresters' Club Annual

UNION-LEAGUE

Paul Bunyan Ball
I. FORMAL
"THE BIG SANDY BOYS"-8-10
square dancing

Entertainment-10-1I
Foresters' Club Jug Band
Carbondale Chamber Arts Orchestra
"THE APOSTLES"-1 1-1
LEAGUE BALLROOM

LABOR DAY WEEKEND
CENTRAL COMMITTEE PETITIONING

Sat., Feb. 17

$3.00 per couple

THROUGH SUNDAY, FEB. 18. THEY ARE DUE ON MONDAY
AT 5:00 P.M. IN EITHER UNION OR LEAGUE UAC OFFICES.

L

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MARKf' S
Open daily 9 A.M.-12 P.M.
605 E. Williams
A NEW COFFEE HOUSE
presents
STEVE DOANE, cellist
DICK EVANS, violinist
MARGARET WU, pianist
TONIGHT-Friday-Feb. 16
THE STELMAJO
STRING QUARTET
Saturday-Feb. 17

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PRESENTS
trattbrb
National Theatre of Canada
in
SHAKESPEARE'S
"A Midsummer Night's Dream"
with

DOUGLAS RAIN MARTHA HENRY
as Bottom as Titania

Directed by JOHN HIRSCH

Designed by LESLIE HURRY

A"" fSOLE U.S. ENGAGEMENT!

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