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February 13, 1968 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-02-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TEN

THE MICHIGAN DAILT

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Jolhnson lieconfirms

FINANCIAL SQUEEZE:
OAA Alters Enrollment Plans

San Antoni
WASHINGTON WP) - President
Johnson said last night that de-
spite the Communist offensive in
Vietnam, his San Antonio For-
mula offer for peace talks still
stands and "we would meet them
tomorrow."
Johnson discussed Vietnam,
dissent at home and unrest in the
cities in a wide-ranging 75 min-
ute question and answer session
with a group of 11 college stu-
dents.
LBJ Is Decent, Honorable
Johnson said that in seeking
peace in Vietnam, "we have gone
just as far as decent and honor-
able people can go."
But he said he stands behind
his 1967 offer to halt the bomb-
ing of North Vietnam and talk
promptly if the Communists indi-
cated this would be productive.
But, addressing the Commun-
ists in effect, he added: "We don't
want you to take advantage like
you did during the Tet."
Hanoi Not Interested
If Hanoi is interested, Johnson
said, it wouldn't have to change
a "could' to a "will" or indulge in
any other semantical niceties in
stating its position.
As an example, he went on, all
they would have to do "is drop a
line and say Geneva is the place
and tomorrow is the day."
Johnson said Hanoi's answer to
his earlier offer of the San An-
tonio formula was the assault on
44 South Vietnamese cities and
24 U. S. bases "on a sacred day"
-the Vietnamese New Year.
Would Negotiate Tomorrow
"Yet we would meet them to-
morrow," he added, "but we're not
going to surrender."
The college students who met
with Johnson in the White House
living quarters were members of
the National Board of Choice '68,
a nationwide collegiate presiden-
tial preference primary to be held
on more than 1,000 campuses Ap-
ril 24.
In the balloting, students not
only will pick their choice for the
presidency but will express them-
selves on referenda issues includ-
ing Vietnam and the urban crisis.
Johnson was asked how he felt
about demonstrations on college
campuses.
"They sadden me, they trouble
me, I think because I know howI
they feel," the President replied.
He said it would be a "very un-
usual student" who wouldn't be
concerned, who wouldn't seek al-
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io Pledge,
ternatives, who wouldn't want to
see the war ended as quickly as
possible, who wouldn't want to
face death on the battlefield."
Just Sunday night, Johnson
said, he went to church with
daughter Lynda and her husband,
Marine Capt. Charles S. Robb.
Son-in-Law Is Next
While reading a cable from
Vietnam in his limousine, he said,
he could not help reflecting that
Robb is due for assignment there
next month and, he said, "I had
no trouble understanding at all."
He said he is concerned not only,
about Robb but about all Ameri-
cans in uniform.
.Johnson expressed the opinion
that if some kind of meter could
be devised to measure human feel-
ing and were installed in a na-
tional security council meeting,
and if the council members were
asked if they wanted peace in
Vietnam, he would bet "that
needle would swing around farth-
er than at Berkely or Texas or
Harvard."

If you like the feel of money-
lots of it...why not
work for a big, strong bank?

4

(Continued from Page 1)
student ratio may be adjusted to
a 50:50 split.
This enrollment shift was pre-
dicted by the 1966 report which
stated, "The greatest share of
undergraduate growth at the
freshman-sophomore level should
be borne by institutions other
than the University of Michigan.
This plan will provide for maxi-
mum utilization of the University
faculty with high level compe-
tence in advanced fields."
This prediction is being real-
ized. Only the graduate schools
and continuing education serv-
ices seem to exhibit any immedi-
ate potential for growth. Smith
noted that the 143 different doc-
toral programs will show con-
tinued growth.
"If a graduate program now has
only ten students, it can handle a
50 per cent growth without staff
and space changes," the vice-
president said.
Even the uncertain draft situ-
ation is not expected to relieve
the pressure on the graduate

schools to expand. The number of1
graduate school applications is
up this year and only one-sixthz
of the applicants is estimated to
be eligible for the draft.
Despite their shortcomings, and
on the merits of their benefits,
attempts at planning wiii con-
tinue. Smith expects increased
federal and state interest in pre-
paring a program of "controlled
growth" for the University. Con-
trolled growth would supposedly
satisfy the University's obliga-
tions to the state, as well as re-
alistically recognizing the finan-
cial limitations imposed on this
institution.

The Federal Office of Educa-
tion is asking for figures to create
ten-year projections of student
body size and student-faculty ra-
tios. The State Board of Educa-
tion, conceived almost four years
ago, "is starting to develop demo-
graphic projections of the kind
we're all interested in," said
Smith.
It is expected that when Arthur
Ross assumes his newly created
position as vice-president for state
relations and planning on July 1,
he will begin re-evaluating the
enrollment projections.
Maybe Providence will be on his
side.

Lots of money isn't all we
have at Security Bank: A
career with us would
mean working in an
atmosphere where youth
is accented, with people
who are progressive as well as financially
astute. Southern California is an exciting

place to be-as a banker
and as an individual. And
Security Bank is the larg-
est bank based there. The
opportunity is great. If you
have an interest in money
and want to work for a big bank that isn't
stuffy, we'd like to talk to you.

Assembly Refuses Review
OfRockefeller Strike Plan
NEW YORK (P) - Republican found himself apparently irrevoca-
Gov. Nelson A. Rockefeller tried bly at odds with his nationally
and failed to gain a joint legis- known fellow Republican, Mayor
lative review yesterday of his con- John V. Lindsay of New York,
troversial settlement formula for liable to a buffeting from legis-
New York City's nine day garbage lative crisis, and a target of bitter
strike. editorial attack by many of the

RUSS GIBB PRESENTS IN DETROIT
CANNED HEAT
THE THYME and COMMANDER CODY
and his Lost Planet Airmen and Ladies' Auxiliary
Extra-Terrestrial Squadron Forces
Fri., Feb. 16, 830 P.M.-1 :00 A.M. Admission $3.00
SAT., FEB, 17-CANNED HEAT
THE CHILDREN-THE CAROUSEL
SUN., FEB. 1 8--Direct from California
THE BYRDS
also THE RATIONALS and
THE WILSON MOWER PURSUIT
7.00-1OOP.M. Admission $3.50
G GRANDE BALLROOM
(GRAND RIVER at BEVERLY, T block So. of Joy-Detroit)
COMING: MARCH 1 and 2-BIG BROTHER and the HOLDING CO.
phone 834-4348
MARCH 8 - THE ELECTRIC PRUNES; MARCH 9 - THE WHO

Make your financial partner
SECURITY FIRST NATIONAL BANK
AN EQUAL OPPORTUNTY EMP'LdYER ML:iRm I LPL - U ,( 1 , ,I
Undergraduate and graduate students contact the Placement Office for
furtheryinformation. We'll have a representative on campus Thursday,
February 15.
SUBSCRIBE
M-V~CHIGxAN DAILY

Rockefeller requested an un- state's newspapers.
usual joint session of the legis- Rockefeller struck at Lindsay in
lature to seek approval of his for- a speech televised from Sche-
mula. But the Democratic con- nectady early in the evening, say-
trolled state Assembly refused. ing he regretted the city was "un-
"A joint session is not needed," able to handle this problem itself
said a spokesman for speaker An- and that the mayor had to come
thony J. Travia. "The Democratic to the state for help."
assemblymen feel it would only be The governor, looking pale and
a big Rockefeller show." drawn, declared that by certifying
Instead, the state Assembly and he can handle the situation with-
the Republican dominated Sen- out state assistance, Lindsay can
ate decided to hold separate "resume his rightful responsibil-
sessions to receive a written, spe- ity."
cial message from the governor, Rockefeller said he had no as-
and to act on the legislation he surance that the legislature in Al-
drafted. bany was prepared to pass his
Thus the embattled Rockefeller Isanitation bill.
CIVIL ENGINEERING SENIORS !
PLAN YOUR FUTURE IN
PUBLIC WORKS ENGINEERING
WITH THE
CITY OF LOS ANGELES
BUREAU OF ENGINEERING
The tremendous growth and development of Los Angeles
presents challenging career opportunities to young engi-
neers, he!pina to build the fastest growing ma, or city in
the nation.
Our starting salary is $776 a month. In addition to ex-
cellent salary, we offer job rotation and tuition reim-
bursement.
Arrange with the Placement Office to talk with our
engineering representative who will be on campus
FEB. 21, 1968

i

a

Why engineering students graduate to Lockheed.
Progress is a matter of degrees. But, that's only the beginning. At Lockheed Missiles
and Space Company, we're working on wideworld... otherworld ... upperworld ... and
subworld projects. Ql We're pretty high on space ...we've got Agena and other
extremely advanced programs to prove it. And, when it comes to ballistic missiles,
Polaris and Poseidon show an arc of triumph. We think deeply, too ... consider our
deep submergence vehicles, for example. And, just to show you our feet are solidly
on the ground, we're working on advanced land vehicles. Information? Business,
government and industry get it out of'our systems.
LMSC has been In the sea...on land... in the air ...in space ... and now, we're com-
ing to your campus. We'd like to talk to you about coming to LMSC. Contact your place-
ment office for an appointment. Our interview team will be on campus Feb. 20 and 21.
Move up to Lockheed ... or move over for those who do. Q If an interview is incon-
venient at this time, write to: Mr. R. C. Birdsall, Professional Placement Manager,
P.O. Box 504, Sunnyvale, California 94088. LMSC is an equal opportunity employer.
LOCKHEED
MISSILES & SPACE COMPANY
A GROUP VIVON OF LOCKHA-ZO ARCRAFT7 CORPORA TON

"When I was in school, I dreaded the thought
of working for some huge company where I'd
be just another number," says IBM's Jim Hamil-
ton. (Jim, who has a B.S. in Electrical Engineering,
is a Systems Engineering Manager in Marketing.)
"At the same time, I krpew there were definite ad-
vantages in working for a large firm. So as I interviewed
each company, I checked into the degree of individuality
I could expect there.
"One of the main reasons I picked IBM was their decentral-
ization. They've got over 300 locations throughout the country.
Which to me means a big company with a small-company
atmosphere."
IBM's small team concept
"Actually, there's plenty of decentralization even within each
location. For instance, in science and engineering, they use a
small team concept. It means, no matter how large the project,
you work individually or as part of a small team-about four
or five people.
"In marketing, I was pretty much my own boss even
before I became a manager. As a systems engineer, it's
up to you to find the solution to a customer's problem,

r

i

.or

SUISNA~yYOSRV1' 0
Deep Submergence Twister
Rescue Vehicle (Advanced land vehicles)
Agena
Information Sytm

Polaris

17,w"+" i'ry

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