100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 07, 1968 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-01-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SUNDAY, JANUARY 7, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SEVEN

SUNDAY, JANUARY 7,1968 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE SEVEN

Behind Closed Doors

MSU

1

n

471

BOB McFARLAND

Even the multiversity has "air" problems these days.
Not the same kind that plagues our giant cities, of course, but
the multiversity's own brand of smog seems just as oppressive to my
existence as the yellow clouds that obscure the noonday sun in New
York and Los Angeles. I'm talking about the impersonal, mechanized
air that pervades the atmosphere of our modern universities, which
seem both larger than life and incompatible with it.
Unfortunately, no one has come up with air purifiers that can
solve this type of atmospheric difficulty. It just possibly could be
that with size automatically comes impersonality. This develop-
ment may be regrettable, but also unavoidable, and we might as
well accept what is. In less fatalistic moments, I think there may
be some hope for cleaning up the University's air, however. Per-
haps, with some work and creativity, we can retain the personal
elements that still exist in the academic atmosphere.
When I look at my cherished field of extracurricular involvement,
intercollegiate athletics, and find that even it has been affected by
this dirty air, I must admit that a pessimistic pressure system rolls
over my mental faculties. Is there no joy in Smogville?
There are some athletic directors and other men in the field who
are worried about the increasing estrangement of that amorphous
mass called the student body and that professional machine called
the athletic department. Most probably have never thought of this
divorcement of the average student and athletics, which is not to say
that they, the members of the athletic bureaucracy, should be account-
able for this neglect. Given the present-day pressures of winning, the
coaches have precious little time to do anything else but produce
victories and scour the boondocks for new material.
About the only way the average student becomes acquainted
with a player is a chance and rare meeting in the classroom. And
outside of Bump Elliott and Dave Strack, most people wouldn't
recognize a member of the coaching staff when passing him on
the street. Many wouldn't even recognize their names. Try to
connect Bill Dodd, Dave Martin, Bill Murphy, and Dick Honig
with their respective coaching assignments, for instance! Or Bert
Katzenmeyer, Dick Kimball, and Moby Benedict.
Why the impersonal trend in athletics has worried administrators
and observers of the collegiate scene is because they fear a significant
flagging of student interest in intercollegiate sports over the long
run. Their arguments are countered by the obvious statement that
professional sports in the United States such as basketball, baseball,
and football are totally devoid of any relationship between spectator
and athlete, outside of the typical spectator-athlete roles at a sporting
event.
And everyone knows how attendance is on the way up in the pro
circuits. The analogy is weak in one respect, however. The pros have
excellence on their side. By exhibiting that quality consistently, the
professional leagues have an added attraction and advantage over the
college brand of ball. The difference in ability is demonstrated year
in and year out by football's college All-Star game, which has become
an annual July farce.
The inexorable march of progress in intercollegiate athletics
has almost obliterated the contrast between professional and
amateur sports, though. All except for the difference in playing
ability, that is.
To my mind, the impersonalization of the collegiate sports scene
Is the single most damaging development in the area today. Com-
pounding the problem is the tragic lack of recognition that this trend
is dangerous at all. And once upon a time, or so I'm told, universities
maintained athletic programs chiefly for the students' benefit.
Granted, there's no turning back the clock. The days of the walk-
on athlete are buried with the likes of Knute Rockne and Fielding
H. Yost. Yet, the level of play has almost certainly risen in iter-
4 collegiate circles, no matter what else can be said.
In the end, I must admit that I hold doubts about whether there
has been a corresponding increase in the student body's enjoyment of
THEIR intercollegiate program. The question is how to bring the
average student back into the athletic scene. Does a university's athle-
tic program have anything to offer the non-athlete besides enter-
tainment?
t Yes! A plethora of coaching expertise in many sports. And it
could be exploited by a simple and relatively inexpensive program
that would bring the student back to intercollegiate athletics and
intercollegiate athletics back to the student.
As mentioned earlier, the coaches have little time available for
teaching duties, and when they do, their talents are directed mainly
to physical education majors. It would seemingly be possible, though,
for the varsity coaches and their staff to sponsor annual clinics in
their respective sports which would be open to all students. The
coaches might also include some of their athletes in the program.
The number of frustrated high school athletes on this campus
who didn't possess the ability for the big-time, but still pursue their
chosen sport, is certainly large. Add to this group the other partici-
pants of the intramural program, a service which involves more stu-
dents than any other on this campus. Take those sedentary spectators,
who might not take an active part in athletics, but would jump at the
opportunity to meet the head football coach, and ask him questions.
The combination of these varying segments would make up a signifi-
cant proportion of the student body on this campus.
The clinic could consist of many phses. A question-and-
answer session could be conducted by the head coach, replying to
general queries about both his own team and the nature of his
sport on the collegiate level. He might pick out one segment of a

sport, such as putting in golf, and give pointers to those attending.
If his players also took part, they could fill the part of instructors
with regard to individual problems.
In team sports, coaches could provide some basic plays for the
group which would be of special interest to athletic managers of
+ dormitories and fraternities. And the sports fan who hasn't heard
Michigan offensive line coach Tony Mason speak on athletic motiva-
tion has an experience in store for him.
The proposal would take some time, effort, and money to im-
plement. If intercollegiate athletics is really to benefit the student
body in the multiversity, the coaching clinics would seem to be well
worth this "trouble." On the practical side, revived student interest
in their sports program would likely be a valuable product of the new
rapport between the athletic department and student body.
I don't know about you, but I can smell that fresh air already.

By ELLIOTT BERRY
Special To The Daily
EAST LANSING - Fortunately
for Michigan State hockey fans,
the Spartan icers are better tech-
nicians than the Spartan elec-
tricians.
The scoreboard and clock blew
a fuse midway through the second
period of last night's game and
was out of commission for the re-
mainder of the evening. Simul-
taneously, Michigan State suffered
a complete breakdown but came
back to force an overtime and
then win 4-3 on a breakaway goal
by Lee Hathaway.
At the 6.06 mark of the overtime
period, Hathaway streaked in and
intercepted a clearing pass and
pulled goalie Jim Keough out of
the net before sending it past the
prone goaltender.
Michigan was outscored 2-1 andI
out-played badly until the elec-
trical mishap forced a 40-minute
intermission.
They then caugh fire and blitzed

LOPS WJ
FIRST PERIOD SCORING: Mich-
Brook (Unassisted) 18:45. MSU-
Phillips (Fallat-Cristofoll) :18; Cris-
tofoli (Phillips) 4:38. PENALTIES:
Mich--Malcolmson ( Hi St) 9:10;
Binnie (Hi Stick) 18:21; Gross
(Rough) 18:21. MSU--Russo (Charg)
7:18; DeBenedet (Hi St) 9:19; French
(Charg) 16:39; Bois (Hi Stick) 18:21.
zCUOND PERIOD SCORING:
None. PENALTIES: Mich-Bennie
(ii. BC) 8:30; Marttila (Interf.)
11:35; Domm (Interf.) 11:35; Ullyot
(Charg) 11:35. MSU-French (In-
terf.) 11:35; Fallat (Interf.) 11:35;
W. Duffett (Charg) 11:35; Hathaway
(Trip) 13:59.

1' lCers
THIRD PERIOD SCORING: Mich
--1eeks (Hartman - Glendinning)
3:53; Marttila (Lord) 9:17. MSU-
Cristofoli (Una) 11:43. PENALTIES
Mich-Hansen (Slash) 10:27; Lord
(Holding) 11:25; Koviak (Charg)
13:25. MSU--Cristofoli (Charg) 14:05
ORERTIME SCORING: MSU-
Hathaway (una) 6:06.
Saves:

in

Overtime,

4-3

MSU
Mich
Scoring:
MSU
Mich

12 9 20 1-42
15 8 13 2 38
2 0 1 1-4
1 0 2 0--3

State goalie Richard Duffett for
the remainder of regulation time.
Only a standout performance by
the sophomore netminder, who
played in his first starting role,
kept the Wolverines from winning
in regulation time.
Michigan tallied twice after the
prolonged intermission to take a
3-2 lead, as Lee Martilla poked
home a rebound of Bill Lord's
slapshot and sophomore Don Deeks
fired home a pass from Jerry
Hartman.

TheSpartans, however, took ad-
vantage of two Wolverine penalties
and forced the game into overtime
when Nino Cristopholie flipped
the puck into the net over three
sprawled Michigan defenders for
his second goal of the night.
All evening long the Spartan
line of Christopholie, Robert Fal-
lat, and Charles Phillip forced the
play to the Wolverines.
Michigan State went flying at
the opening faceoff as Fallat
sent a pass to Phillips, who was
standing alone in front of the
net, and whipped it past Keough
with only 18 seconds played.
The Spartans kept the pressure
on and forced the play into the
Michigan zone continually during
the first period.
The Spartans kept the pressure
on throughout the first half of
the second period. At 11:35, how-
ever, a minor brawl broke out
which sent three Wolverines and
three Spartans to the penalty box.
It was then that the scoreboard
and clock broke down and caused
the 40-minute delay.

Hoosiers Rip Gophers'
'T Open Title Defense

(Continued from Page 1)
The Spartans, playing man-for-
man defense all the way, shot
better from the field with 25 goals
on 58 shots against Illinois' 24 for
56.
Mike Price contributed 19 Illini
points, while Michigan State was
led by Steve Rymal with 18.
, * * *
Hoosier Heist
BLOOMINGTON-Stone cold in
the first half which ended with it
trailing 31-28, Indiana shot into
the front at the start of the second
period and increased their margin
steadily.
Bill DeHeer scored 17 points
and grabbed 18 rebounds in an
individual dual with Tom Kondla,
Minnesota's Big Ten scoring lead-
er last season. Kondla had 16
points and 12 rebounds.
Butch Joyner and Earl Schnei-
der chipped in 16 points apiece
for the winners. LeRoy Gardner
had 14 and Al Nuness 12 for the
Gophers.
Buckeye Bust
COLUMBUS-Bill Hosket scor-
ed a career high 35 points as
hot-shooting Ohio State crushed
Purdue.
The Buckeyes, playing before a
capacity crowd of 13,497, fired
a torrid 58 per cent in the first
half in cruising to a 61-46 lead at
intermission.
The losing Boilermakers never

could get closer than 13 in the
second half as the Bucks con-
tinued their assault on the basket
with all five starters in double
figures.
Hosket, whose previous high
was 33 against Minnesota two
years ago, netted 15 baskets in
23 attempts and was five of eight
from the free throw line.
Rick Mount, Purdue's prize
sophomore who leads the Big Ten
in scoring, collecteds19 points to
lead the Boilermakers.
The 108 points were only three
shy of the school record of 111
set by the Bucks in 1960 when
Jerry Lucas was a sophomore.
Wildcat Wipe-out
EVANSTON-Northwestern, led
by the balanced scoring provided
of sophomores Don Adams and
Dale Kelley, sped to a 30-20 half-
time lead as Iowa ace Sam Wil-
liams was held to six points.
Williams came on strong in the
second half with a 24-point spurt
to grab scoring laurels with 30
points, but the Wildcats never re-
linquished their lead.
Iowa closed within three points
at 50-47 with eight minutes to
play but Adams hit on a basket
and Kelley scored seven of North-
Iwestern's next 11 points to put
the Wildcats ahead comfortably.
Adams led Northwestern with
21 points and Kelley finished with
17, getting 15 in the last half. Mike
Weaver chipped in with 16.
The key to Northwestern's tri-
umph was control of the boards.
The Wildcats outrebounded Iowa
36-22.
SCORES
North Carolina 75, Duke 72
Kentucky 94, Vanderbilt 78
okiahoma 71, Missouri 70
St. Bonaventure 101, Niagara 72
Houston 118, Centenary 81
SPORTS NIGHT EDITOR:
HOWARD KOHN

-Daly-Andy Sacks
MICHIGAN STATE'S goal in overtime last night gave the Spartans a split in the home-and-
home series this weekend. Michigan goalie Jim Keough made 36 saves last night and 41 Friday
night, including the one above against Wayne D uffett, in one of the sternest tests of his career.

"Nobody suffers more during these games than
Dave Strack."
-NBC Sportscaster Bill Fleming
MICHIGAN WISCONSIN
G FT R P T G FT R P T
Sullivan. 2-7 1-1 5 3 5 Franklin 15-20 4-10 15 3 34
Stewart 5-18 9-9 11 3 19 Magle 4-14 4-6 8 2 12
Tomjanovich 9-18 1-2 7 4 19 Carlin 4-7 1-2 1 1 9
Pitts 8-15 6-8 7 5 22 Johnson 6-11 2-2 6 2 14
Maxey 1-12 0-0 4 5 2 Reppick 1-8 2-2 6 2 4
McClellan 0-0 0-1 0 0 0 Mitchell 0-4 0-1 2 1 0
Bloodworth 3-5 0-0 0 0 6 voigt 0-0 0-0 0 0 0
Henry 1-2 0-0 1 1 2 McCallum 2-6 0-0 6 3 4
Totals 29-77 17-20 45 21 75 Zink 0-0 0-1 1 1 0
Totals 32-70 13-24 55 15 77

SAVE
AT
ULIC HS
ANN ARBOR'S FRIENDLY BOOKSTORE

Big Ten Stamlings

1

OPENINGS FOR
CHILD CARE WORKERS
-HAWTHORN CENTER
Work-Experience Opportunity with Emotionally
Disturbed Children.
Hawthorn Center offers mature students a unique
opportunity to work directly with disturbed children
in a creative, well-supervised, in-patient treatment
setting - a particularly rewarding experience for
potential professional workers in Education, Psy-
chology, Social Work, Medicine and related Be-
havioral Sciences.
Hours: 32 to 40 hours per week; flexible schedul-
ing to include weekends is possible.
Age Requirement: Minimum-20 years.
Education: Minimum-Two credit years completed
and good academic standing in third year.
Salary: With Bachelor's degree-$6200-$6500
per year.
Without Bachelor's degree-$5600-$6350
per year.

I

I

OBSERViERS WANTED
for
Color Vision Experiments
You must be Color Normal, or
Deuteranomalous,
Protanomalous, or
Deuteranopic

-

Conference Overall

Indiana
Wisconsin
Ohio State
Illinois
Northwestern
Iowa
MICHIGAN
Mich. State
Minnesota
Purdue

w
1
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0

L
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
1

Pct.
1.000
1.000
1.000
1.000
1.000
.000
.000
.000
.000
.000

W
7
7
7
5
6.
5
4
4
3
5

L
3
8
2
5
4
5
6
5
8
5

2-6 hours per week
Rates: Make me an offer
CALL: G. B. Lee-764-0574
or walk in-5080 Kresge I I
University of Michigan Medical Center
Ann at Forest

Petitioning for
Joint Judiciary Council

Call or Write:

I

Director of Nursing
Hawthorn Center
Northville, Michigan
Telephone: Area Code 31 3-
Fl 9-3000

Six Seats Available
Pick up petitions at SGC offices in the SAB
Petitions Due 5 P.M., Tues., Jan. 16

--- _ _-

-1

I

--- ----
3

VOICE - SDS
Executive Committee
Meeting
Mon., Jan. 8, 2nd fl. S.A.B.
7:30 P.M.-OPEN TO ALL

II
I.

You wi

I

I

find our store

U

--

spec

ially equipped to supply

*

you with LAW

case

books

UNION-LEAGUE

CONTEMPORARY DISCUSSION

and supplies. Our LAW section
is staffed by law students
to assist you.

An International Peace Army
For Vietnam

Admlb sommilool ld

tea. a - ME -Mass- ma -m

i

I

I

11

II m. u -m m -- - l m qm .-m - m, - "- IIM

11

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan