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February 13, 1968 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-02-13

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TUESDAY, FEBRU'ARY 13, 1963

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SEVEN.

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 1968 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE SEVEN

Killy Cops Second Gold Medal; U.S. Icers Win

VOICE-SDS General Meeting
TUESDAY, 8:00, Room 3-G Union
EVERYONE INVITED
Join The Daily Sports Staff

GRENOBLE, France (T)-Jean decisive margin of 2.22 seconds-;
Claude Killy, France's magnifi- although American ace Billy Kidd
cent ski master, took another posted the fastest time in today's
giant stride yesterday toward a climactic race,
gold medal sweep of the three Killy will shoot for the Alpine:
men's Alpine races at the Winter triple - a feat accomplished only
Olympic Games, winning the once before in Olympic history -
giant slalom with disarming ease. Friday and Saturday in the spe-
Killy, the 24-year-old innkeep- cial slalom.

er's son who flashed to victory in
the downhill last Friday and set a
blistering pace Sunday in the first
of the two giant slalom runs, beat
Willy Favre of Switzerland by a

after a brilliant run in the giant
slalom today.
"No medals today," he said dis-
appointedly as he wrapped his
arm around teammate Jim
Heuga, "but we still have another{
chance."
Kidd, of Stowe, Vt., astounded
everyone by turning in the best
time today in the second heat of
the giant slalom that was won
by France's invincible Jean-
Claude Killy. Kidd was clocked in
one minute, 46.46 seconds.
He was very pleased with his
run, but sorry it did not slip him
into the medal bracket. He fin-
OLYMPIC STANDINGS

Hit It Hard
"I hit it as hard as I could," the
dashing Frenchman said after his
final run of one minute, 46.54 sec-
onds locked up the giant slalom~
title. "I will try just as hard in
the special slalom. I know it won't
be easy, but I'll give it everything
I have."
Killy, whose first giant slalom

ished fifth in a combined time ofI
eighth after Sunday's first heat.
"It was not a perfect run," he
said. "I could have skied better.
The visibility was very bad and
the snow was soft."
Heuga, of Squaw Valley, Calif.
who started the day in seventh
plaae, finished 10th with a 3:33.89
combined after a 1:48.43 clocking.,
"I just didn't race as well as I
like," said the bronze medalwin-
ner in 1964. "The course- didn't
bother me. It was soft, but I did
not mind. I am only discontented
with myself."
Two other Americans, Spiderj
Sabich of Kyburz, Calif., and i
Rick Chaffee of Rutland, Vt., also1
showed well. Sabich, timed in!

last night by defeating West Ger- the West+
many 8-1. : board. Fu
The Americans' triumph fol- Pat Rupp
lowed losses to Czechoslovakia, footed.
Sweden, Russia and Canada in Temper
their first four games, 20 minute
Doug Volmar, a Minneapolis en- pushing a
gineer, paced the Americans' sec- on both to
ond period attack that broke open exhibition
a close game. Volmar had two teams last
goals while defenseman Lou man coac
Nanne, also of Minneapolis, and States of
Larry Pleau, an Army private sta- Nanne ti
tioned at Ft.Campbell, Ky., got second per
the others. he fired in
The U.S. squad had forged only Paul Hurl
a 2-1 first period lead over the hit on a 1
winless West Germans. ute mark.
Hard Fought Volmar
Defenseman Don Ross of St. .6:32 and
f.i ^ ^^^^j

Germans on the score-
nk's shot caught goalie
of Minneapolis flat-
s flared in the opening
s which were marked by
and shoving by players
eams. In a pre-Olympic
game between the same
t month, the West Ger-
ch accused the United
dirty playing.
triggered the Americans'
xod surge at 10:45 when
n a rebound of a shot by
ey of Minneapolis. Pleau
15-footer at the 13-min-
got his first goal at
his second with only
nds remaining in the

YOUNG POETS
-"FESTIVAL
- TOM CLARK, RON PADGETT,
- TED BERRIGAN
February 11: 2:30 & 8:00
February 12: 4:00 & 8:00
LM February 13: 8:00

dash of 1:42.72 gave him a lead Gold Silver Bronze
of , more than one second over Francey 2 2 0
Favre going into the finale, Holland 2 1 2
clinched his second gold medal Italy 2 0 0
with the second fastest run of Finland 1 2 1
the day. Russia 1 2 1
Billy Kidd, flashing the form GArany 1 1 3
that won him a silver medal in Czechoslovakia 1 0 1
1964, bolstered, United States Sweden 20 1
hopes for a men's skiing medal Switzerlandy 0 21
Rut man 0a 011
in the present Olympic Games Rumania 0 0 1
----rrrr rrrrrrrrrrrr rrrrrrrrrrrr rrrrrrrrrrrr-----
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Thompson's PIZZA
THIS COUPON IS GOODFOR1
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II ,
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, Feb. 13-15
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1:49.82, finished 14th with a Paul and center Joe Morrison ofI
3:36.15 total while Chaffee was Minneapolis scored for the United
15th with 1:49.75 and 3:36.19: States in the hard fought open-
figures. ing period.
Ross hammered a shot through
First U.S. Victory a maze of legs into the net at 3:07,

period.

Pro Standings
N BA
Eastern Division

By The Associated Press
GRENOBLE, France-The U.S.
hockey team, scoring four times
in the last 10 minutes of the sec-
ond period, recorded its first vic-
tory of the Olympic tournament

and Morrison made it 2-0 at 4:30j
when he picked up a rebound and.
beat Josef Schramm, the German
goalie, with a rising shot.
However, only 58 seconds after
Morrison's goal, Lorenz Funk put

W L

Be-
Pet hint

I

"'" ""'mM

I

'!

UNION ASSEMBLY ROOM

I

Philadelphia 44 16 .733 -
Boston 39 19 .672 4
New York 31 32 .492 14
Detroit 29 32 .475 151
Cincinnati 27 33 .450 17
Baltimore 26 35 ,426 181
Western Division
St, Louis 45 19 .703 -
San Francisco 37 25 .597. 7
Los Angeles 35 25 .583 8
Chicago 20 41 .328 23
Seattle 19 41 .317 24
San Diego 14 48 .226 30
Yesterday's Games
Chicago 112, Cincinnati 104, over-
time.
Today's Games
Los Angeles at Baltimore
San Diego at Chicago
Philadelphia vs. San Francisco at
Oakland.
Boston at Detroit
Cincinnati vs. St. Louis at Syra-
cuse.

d
I,
i,
r-

No Admission

UAC

IN

an

After graduiation, what?
Will you begin your career as an
engineer or scientist or return to
school for an advanced degree?

NHL
East Division
W L T Pts GF
Montreal 29 15 9 67 166
Boston 26 18 10 62 192
Chicago 24 18 13 61 161
New York 24 8 11 59 155
*Toronto 23 20 9 55 145
Dertoit 20 24 10 50 182
West Division
Philadelphia 25 20 8 58 134
Minnesota 22 22 9 53 135
*Los Angeles 22 27 4 48 133
St. Louis 19 24 9 47 121
Pittsburgh 19 25 9 47 133
Oakland 11 33 11 33 110
* ate game nuot included.
Yesterday's Results
Toronto at Los Angeles, inc.
Today's Games
No games scheduled.

GA
112
159
161
141
120
177
121
155
171
131
154
162

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LABOR DAY WEEKEND
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Chemical Engineers and Chemists-for research and devel-
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Engineering Physicists and Physicists-theoretical and ex-
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signal processing, infrared radiation, acoustics, magnetic
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plus weapon systems development and studies.

FEBRUARY 10-15

UNION-LEAGUE

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Graduate Recent college graduates Selected by Personnel Full salary, tuition, books &
Work-Study in certain engineering & Officer ... admission to fees.. .2 days each week
scientific fields. local graduate school devoted to study and classes
for M.S. for 2 years maximum.
Intermediate Recent college graduates Selected by Personnel Full tuition, books, fees,
Graduate in certain engineering & Officer... admission to travel per diem & 1/ GS-7
Study scientific fields. graduate school ... an salary... (over $3800) ...
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Advanced
Graduate
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Scientists &
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Selected by NOL
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presents
THE BYRDS and CHRIS MONTEZ
in concert Fri., Fern. 23, 7:30 & 10:00 P.M., Hill Aud.
BLOCK TICKET SALES
Price range- $3.50, $3.00, $2.50
Sign Up at UAC Office, 3rd floor League
TODAY through Fri., Feb. 16, 5:00 P.M.

NOL NEEDS:
Aerospace Engineers or Hydrodynamicists-design studies
of high-speed, high-performance re-entry systems, basic
problems in theoretical and experimental aerothermody-
namics, aeroballistics and hydroballistics; and aerodynamic
....... A nnfw nm nA

An NOL representative will be on campus...
FEBRUARY 26, 1968
Contact your Placement Office for interview.
Summer Professional Employment ... for outstanding

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