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February 10, 1968 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-02-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

, FEBRUARY 10, 1969

TILE MICHIGAN D.4ILV

PAGE SEVEN

......._
rr rwr

FEBRUARY 10, 1968 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE SEVEN

CLARK NORTON

h~ lit90 .
An Infraction
By Any Other Name , *
"Let's lynch 'em"' a football player shouted during one of Doc
I osh's Astro classes yesterday. referring to The Daily sportswriters
who revealed that severa local merchants were giving discounts and
free merchandise to Michigan athletes, apparently in violation of Big
Ten rules.
"This would be a good room for it," Prof. Losh responded.
Van Patrick, a sports broadcaster for TV station WJBK in
Detroit, commented on his 6:20 P.M. show, "Clark Norton and
Howard Kohn are two very naive journalist who apparently had
nothing better to do with their time than dig up things that have
been going on for years. Maybe they're the only two purists left
in the world. But they'd better watch their own closets, because
everyone has some skeletons to hide,"
Although Patrick's statement is unfounded, he did raise a good
point. Fveryon does have some skeletons to hide.
The information which rar yesterday in The Daily by no means
cites the most serious infractior, of the Big Ten rules which allegedly
exist and have existed at Michigan. And just as important, the in-
fractions which exist at Michigan appear to be by no means as serious
as those which apparently exist and haxe existed at several, and
perhaps all, of the other Big Ten schools.
To ignore any of these infractions, or excuse them, for what-
ever reason, simply serve to legitimize a double standard which
has been building up over the years in the world of intercollegiate
athletics,
Certainly the alleged violations mentioned in The Daily represent
"no mortal sin," as one football player put it yesterday. Few people
would find fault with a friendly merchant who.simply wants to give
a student a break And it certainly isn't surprising that many of the
athletes would take advantage of the situation. Many say that it never
really occurred to them that discounts might be illegal, and several
coaches have echoed that sentiment.
Yet the Big Ten rules would seem to indicate otherwise. That is
a matter for conference officials to decide, of course; but if the dis-
counts are found to be illegal it would be obscuring the issue to de-
nounce the investigation as picane.
The same Daily investigation that revealed the giving of dis-
counts to athletes has revealed a number of other probable Infrac-
tions that have occurre at Michigan. Atheltic Director Fritz
Crisler has been informed of several of the alleged rule violations,
and has promised that he will investigate them.
In addition, the same player have leveled allegations at several
other conference schools; violations of the rules appear to be wide-
spread, and to excuse any or all of them will simply serve, again to
perpetuate the double standard.
Ignorig rule violators then, to protect the innocent, the guilty,
or the "innocent guilty," is one alternative. Yet to do so is in essence
admitting that the conference rules are not to be taken seriously. If
one is "only guilty when he gets caught," if no one respects the letter
or even the spirit of the rules then they are worthless.
In view of what has happened, that may well be true. The con-
ference rules may be so unrealistic that no shool could follow them
4 and still maintain a competitive athletic program.
If this is the case, wouldn't it be logical to simply loosen the
restrictions, provide more realistic regulations, and remove the
hypocrisy from intercollegiate athletics?
That is the responsibility which rests on the shoulders of Big
Ten officials now. To turn the Daily allegations into "another Illi-
nois" might be consistent wjth the attitude of the conference in the
past but it would not be the sensible action.
To use certain coaches, or players, as scapegoats this time-
would merely postpone the inevitable. The Daily has merely
scratched the surface in the realm of rules violations, and it is
only a matter of time before each school, in turn, is discovered
in the act.
Crisler has told The Daily that he "doesn't care about what the
q other schools are doing, I just want to keep Michigan clean." Yet
if he, or any coach, athlete, or, student, can not understand why it
is necessary to uncover any rules violations in order to keep Michi-
gan clean; he can not be serious about his intentions.
It is our hope not only that Michigan become as clean as pos-
sible but that the conference re-evaluate its regulations if it is shown
that its members can not obey them.
If nobody really cares, then it's a sad commentary on every-
one who has any connection with intercollegiate athletics.

Cageri
By BILL LEVIS
Iowa swings into town today at
1:30 p.m. looking for its second
road victory and a chance to get
back into the thick of the Big
Ten race.
The Hawkeyes have had phe-
nomenal success at home, winning
all seven games in Iowa City this
season, but have had trouble on
the road (although they beat
Michigan State in East Lansing,
76-71). They have already lost at
Northwestern and Illinois.
"They figure that they've got
to win three on the road and
every game at home to tie for the
title," said Michigan assistant
coach John Orr. "They would be
in the gravy if they win here,
since they play three of their
last four games at home."
Iowa, currently tied for third
place in the Big Ten with a 4-2
record after defeating Purdue 94-
87 at home Thursday night, is led
by Sam Williams, who is present-
ly 13th in the nation in scoring
with a 25.6 average.
The Best
"Sammy is the best player in
the conference and one of the
great players- in the country,"
boasted Orr. "They call him Su-
per-Super Sam at Iowa and he
is really quick going into the
basket. He is their leading scorer.
rebounder, and assist mean, and
he does everything but sweep the
floor for-them."
Williams, small for a forward
at 6'3", was all Big Ten last year
after spending his first two years
playing junior college ball. He
has teamed this season with jun-
ior guard Ron Norman to give the
Hawkeyes one of the most potent
one-two punches in the confer-
ence.
Norman is probably the stead-
iest player for the Hawkeyes and,
according to Orr, "is -the only
player who stays in the game all
the time. Iowa coach Ralph Mill-
er likes to shuffle his top seven
players in and out."

Challenge
The Lineups

Streaking Hawks
Swimmers FaceNo. 1 Indiana

IOWA

POS.

MICHIGAN

(53) Sam Williams (6'3")

F (45) Rudy Tomjanovich (6'7")

(51) Huston Breedlove (6'51/") F (40) Dennis Stewart (6'6")

(4) Dick Jensen (6'8')
(42) Rolly McGrath (6'1") C
(11) Ron Norman (6'3")
Norman is a busy man all over
the court. Said Orr, "Along with
guard Rolly McGrath, he leads
the Hawkeyes in the zone press
that tbey'll probably use most of
the game. And then Iowa will
sometimes go into a delay for up
for five minutes and Norman,
Williams and McGrath will do
all the handling of the ball. Mill-
er doesn't want the guys who
can't handle the ball to touch it
at all."
While Orr said that the Iowa!
guards are excellent ball han-
dlers, he observed, "They often
get careless and throw the ball!
away a lot."
When Miller wants to stress
defense he goes with McGrath
and senior forward Huston Breed-
love.'Both are low scorers, how-
ever, and Breedloveb has the ten-
dency to foul quite often. Orr
said, "When they're in there,
Sammy has to do more things."
The Guns
Miller does have shooters, how-
ever, and wthen he wants his boys
to pile up points he calls on two
sophomores to liven up the of-
fense. "Chad Calabria comes in
there for McGrath and he's not
shy at all. He's a driver and
shooter. He took 16 shots against
Purdue."
The other top substitute, Glenn
Vidnovic, didn't even play his first
game until Thursday night after
being scholastically ineligible first
semester. But what a debut he
had against Purdue.
The sophomoreforward took 10
shots against tle Boilermakers
and scored 17 points. "I'm just

C (20) Bob Sullivan (6'4")
G (24) Jim Pitts (6'3")
G (44) Ken Maxey (5'9")
hoping that he has a bad game
today," laughed Orr.
The Hawkeyes' center is an-
other sophomore Dick Jensen,
who's improving all the time, ac-
cording to Orr. Jensen finally has
the pivot job all to himself since
6'9" Joe Bergman quit the team
along with junior guard Chris
Philips. Philips had teamed with
Norman to tear the Wolverines
apart in Iowa City last year.
New Starter
Bergman's opponent at center
will be the only new starter for
the Wolverines. Junior Bob Sul-
livan, who has been rotating be-
tween guard and forward all sea-#
son, will get the nod over Bill
Fraumann who started the last
five games for Michigan.
Head coach Dave Strack said,
"Bob has been moved into the
pivot to give us some more offen-
sive strength." Fraumann has
onlycaveraged about two points
per contest.
Sullivan, who was hampered by
a bad ankle earlier in the season,
brings a 11 point average into
the game. "Fraumann will see
plenty of action, however," noted
Strack.
Rudy Tomjanovich, who cut his
hand on the rim against Minne-
sota Monday, also will be start-
ing after pumping in 30 points
against the Gophers in the Wol-
verines' first conference win in
over a year.
Strack said the cut does not
affect the sophomore's shooting at
all. Tomjanovich did not start
against Minnesota after missing
practice last Sunday.

By DOUG HELLER

the one swimmer in the nation
whn h d Bpf Rlln fm

Indiana is the number one '" La n LU JjJU a 1U fLime
swimming team in the nation. In a special feature, both teams
Michigan, ranked number six, have agreed to substitute the 400-
lost to the Hoosiers 83-40 in Matt yard individual medley and the
Mann Pool, January 13. Today, 800-yard freestyle relay, events
they have to take on Indiana in usually reserved for conference
Bloomington. and national champonships, for
It's the fifth time the Wolver-tlysheded200-IM
ines will take on Indiana this sea- and 400-yard freestyle relay.
son: these include the Big Ten Kinkead, Tom Arusoo, and John
Relays, the two dual meets, the Roberson will swim the 400-IM,

Big Ten Conference Champion-
ships in Ann Arbor over spring
break, and the National Colle-
giate Collegiate Championships.
Reasonable people would prob-
ably call Michigan a gang of
masochists.
Coach Gus Stager of the Wol-
verines, while not exactly exud-
ing confidence about today's meet,
said "I think we'll give a better
showing than we did last time.,"
In the 1000-yard relay, Mike
O'Connor, too sick to swim ef-
fectively the last time, is back in
form. Butterflyer Lee Bisbee has
improved enough at the 1000 to
allow Gary Kinkead to switch to
other events.
They will try to top Indiana's
Olympian Bob Windle, and Fred
Southward, who won the event
last time.
Bob Kircher, just another swim-
mer a month ago, has impressed
Stager in the 50-yard freestyle.
Indiana's Bryan Bateman stands
in his way.
Juan Bello, who was strictly
an individual medley man last
month, swam the nation's top
200-yard freestyle up to that time
last week, and will swim that
event today.
He is up against Bill Burrell,!

while Kinkead, O'Connor, Bello
and John Salsasa should be in
the 800 relay.
Diving coach Dick Kimball
should use the same foursome
that nearly split with Indiana the
last time. Fred Brown, who won
the 1-meter board and Bruce
McManaman, who took second at
threemeters, will stick with these
events. In addition, Peter Em-
ond will dive at one-meter and -
Jay Meaden will try three-meters. JAY MEADEN
Meaden, among the top ten in
the nation in both boards last one-meter dives for the Hoosiers,
year, has had some difficulty get- Captain Brown earlier in the
ting untracked, so far, but should week, said, "I sure would like to
be expected to start moving soon, beat Indiana in their own pool;
Win Young and Jim Henry will but you know, they've never lost
be favored to take the three- and~ there,"

A SUNDAY SPECIAL-
FEbruary 11
A FIRESIDE FOLKSING with
BOB WHITE
playing guitar, banjo & autoharp
at the
PRESBYTERIAN CAMPUS CENTER
1431 Washtenaw
EVLRYONE IS WELCOME 7:30 P.M.

I

FINAL HOME MEET:
Matmen Take On Buckeyes

SPECIAL, MYSTERY SALE
AT
discount -records, inc.

By PATRICIA ATKINS
Beginning at 3:30 this afternoon
a hopefully healthy Wolverine
wrestling team will continue a
seems as old as the sport itself,
rivalry against Ohio State that
and at the same time will con-
clude the home dual meet season.
Then, on Monday, the Wolverines
travel to Madison for the first of
three road meets against Wiscon-
sin.
For seniors Dave Porter, Wayne
Hansen, Fred Stehman, and Bill
Waterman, today's will be the
final dual meet behind the pre-
tentious portals of the Events
Building. "Although it's the last
home dual meet of the year," in-
forms Coach Cliff Keen, "it'll still
be the strongest line-up that we
can get. Not that we're absolutely
devoid of sentiment though, if cir-
cumstances permit. But we'll
wrestle to win first."
Wrestling to win against Ohio
State, with 10 of their 15 wrest-
lers listed as sophomores, might
look like little problem, but only
nine can wrestle. So seniors like
co-captains Ed Cummings, who
finished third at 177 in last year's
conference tournament and Roger
Young, Big Ten finalist in the
130 division, along with 160-
pounder Chris Burt, will "help
make therm strong all the way up
the line," according to Keen.

Two juniors, John Aseff (137)
and Stan Guzell (145), round out
the lettermen on the Buckeye
team. At 177, sophomore Tom
Kruse has also looked good. "They
have a better team this year than
they've had for several years," re-
ports Keen. "This isn't true only
of Ohio State, though. The caliber
of wrestling has been improving
through our league the last few
years."
Yet part of the Wolverine's
wrestling caliber may not be
completely healthy. Lou Hudson,
who didn't wrestle against Pitts-
burgh in last week's meet because
of the flu, will probably wrestle
today, although he won't be up to
his full ability. There is also a
possibility that 177-pounder Wa-
termanemay not compete because
of illness. If not, junior Charlie
Reilly will get a chance to make
his first start.
Sanger Returns
Jim Stanger, the third Wolver-
in regular absent from the Pitts-
burgh meet, though from a back
injury instead of illness, will re-
turn to the line-up.
Michigan, undefeated against
conference teams this season,
hopes to keep the record that way,
against both the Buckeyes today
and Wisconsin on Monday. "All
the meets aim for the ultimate

purpose," declares Keen, "which
is to be conference champion. Now
solely by the Big Ten Conference
the championship is determined
tournament and not dual meet
wins, but that doesn't lessen the
value of dual meets."
After today's meet with Ohio
State, the Wolverines begin a
tough- road trip to finish up the
season, playing Wsiconsin on
Monday, followed by Michigan
State, and then Minnesota.
Badgers Up
Last week in a four team meet
with Purdue, Minnesota, and Ohio
State, the Badgers finished first.
"Wisconsin is really tough this
year," comments Keen. "They've
got a lot of good boys." One of
them is Mike Gluck at 152 pounds,
who was first in the conference _
last year and second in the na-
tion. His competition will be
Stehman also a conference champ,
but at 160 last year, and fourth
in the nation. Co-captain along
with Gluck, 167-pounder Rick
Heinzelman beat Waterman in
the Midlands. Another Badger
strength is at 145 where junior
Bob Nicholas has won 10 while
losing only one during the first
half of the season.
The Wolverine line-up, as of
now, will be the same for both
meets.

1235 S.

University

TOMORROW-SU NDAY-FEB. 11
11 A.M. to 5 P.M.
FANTASTIC SAVINGS

ON THOUSANDS OF L.P.'s!!

16

7.

Professional Standings

NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division

W L T Pts
Montreal 27 15 9 63
Chicago 24 16 13 61
Boston 26 18 8 60
New York 24 18 9 57
Toronto 23 19 9 55
Detroit 20 24 8 48
West Division
Philadelphia 23 20 8 54
Minnesota 21 21 9 51
Los Angeles 22 27 4 48
Pittsburgh 19 25 , 8 46
St. Louis 19 238 8 46
Oakland 10 32 11 31

GF
154
157
188
150
142
178
128
128
133
132
117
104

GA
108
149
155
136
116
173
118
152
171
153
126
154

Yesterday's Results
No games scheduled.
Today's Games
Chicago at Montreal
New York atPittsburgh
Boston at Detroit, afternoon
Philadelphia at St. Louis
Minnesota at Oakland
Tomorrow's Games
Montreal at Chicago, afternoon
Toronto at Oakland
Detroit at New York
St. Louis at Boston
Philadelphia at Minnesota

This Weekend in Sports
Saturday
BASKETBALL-Iowa in Events Building, 1:30 p.m.
HOCKEY-Michigan State at Coliseum, 8:00 p.m.
WRESTLING-Ohio State in Events Building, 3:30 p.m.
GYMNASTICS-Michigan at Ohio State.
SWIMMING-Michigan at Indiana.
TRACK-Michigan State Relays at,East Lansing.f
Monday
WRESTLING-Michigan at Wisconsin.

One Seat .Available
Joint Judiciary Council
Petitions due Wednesday, Feb. 14
GIRLS ONLY
Pick up petitions in SGC offices

I

ADMIN. TRAINEE
COLLEGE GRADUATE
WE ARE LOOKING FOR THE IMAGINATIVE BUSINESS OR
LIBERAL ARTS GitADUATE WHO WANTS THE CHALLENGE
OF A CAREER IN PROFESSIONAL ADMINISTRATION DEAL-
ING WITH PERSONNEL. SALARY ADMINISTRATION, EX-
PENSE, AND PROCESStN( CONTROLS.
IF YOU ARE A RECENT COLLEGE GRADUATE OR A GRAD
RETURNING FRUM MILITARY SERVICE AND ARE INTER-

YOUNG POETS
S- FESTIVAL
.M -TOM CLARK, RON PADGETT,
TED BERRIGAN
,,.,, t13).g)f"r9 Cf

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