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February 09, 1968 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-02-09

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FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9,1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

FR_., ERAR ,98TE IHGNDIL ~G HE

4

$3 Billion Foreign Aid
Bill Includes Defense
.Funds to South Korea,

Wallace To Compete
In Presidential Race

REBUILDING CITIES:

S.

Vietnam

War

Repairs

WASHINGTON (-) - President
Johnson asked a reluctant Con-
gress yesterday for $3 billion in
new foreign aid funds, including
$100 million immediately to
strengthen South Korea's defense
against the Communist North.
Johnson's special Korean arms
plea was about the only surprise
in a foreign aid message which
sought $2.9 billion for the global
program next fiscal year-$2.5 bil-
lion in economic assistance and
$420 million in military.
The President declared the
worldwide aid effort is "as impor-

tant and as essential to the securi-
ty of this nation as our military
defenses." He contended that
fighting hunger, disease and il-
iteracy among the masses in un-
developeds lands curbs the causes
of wars.
But administration officials
freely acknowledged omens of
trouble again in Congress, which
last year whacked nearly $1 billion
from Johnson's $3.2 billion request.
His new program is about $750
million more than was voted for
the current fiscal year ending
June 30.

Union Pacific Stopped
From Cutting Crew Size

By The Associated Press
A federal judge at Lincoln, Neb.,
9 today issued a temporary restrain-
ing order against ,the Union Paci-
fic Railroad from reducing the
size of the crews on its freight
trains.
At the same time he ordered the
$rotherhood of Railway trainmen
not to extend its strike to the
+ Union Pacific until good faith ne-
gotiations have taken place.
The brotherhood is on strike
against three roads, the Missouri
Orangeburg
Fears More
Disturbances
a .ORANGEBURG, S.C. (M)-The
administration of predominantly
Niegro South Carolina State Col-
lege urged yesterday that its 1,500
students "remain on the campus
because of the dangers involved"
in rioting which has disrupted
Orangeburg for the last three
nights.
Thirteen persons have been in-
jured in the riots, including three
who suffered minor gunshot
wounds Wednesday night.
The rioting resulted from Negro
protests against the all white po-
licy of the town's only bowling
alley. It began when a demonstra-
tion against the bowling alley by
about 100 students flared up Mon-
day night.
National Guardsmen, were call-
ed up Tuesday and Wednesday
nights to quell the riots.
Sources in Orangeburg said early
today Gov. Robert- McNair would
meet with the operation of the
bowling alley, Harry Floyd, to dis-
cuss ways of ending the violence.
McNair's office said, however, no
such conference has been planned.
Floyd said he would be willing
to talk with the governor, but has
not been invited.
M. M. Nance Jr., acting presi-
dent of South Carolina State, is-
sued a memorandum to* that
school's students yesterday which
said in part :
"Your personal safety is in
jeopardy, and we are requesting
that all students remain on cam-
pus and refrain from going to the
periphery area of the college's
campus, throwing brick bats and
bottles as was the case last
night . ,."
f 1

Pacific, its subsidiary Texas &
Pacific, and the Seaboard Coast
Lines, over the issue of how many
men are to be in the crew of
freight trains.
The Union Pacific posted orders
Tuesday cutting back the size of
crews on ceftain trains from three
to two men.
The union contends the three
man crews are essential for safety.
U.S. Dist. Judge Robert Van
Pelt said the public interest re-
quires that railroad service be
maintained while the parties at-
tempt to settle the issue by nego-
tiation.
The struck roads serving the
Midwest, Southwest, and South-
east were operating some services
today, but only war materials and
perishible cargoes were moving.
President Thomas W. Rise of
Seaboard Coast Lines issued state-
ment saying it was absolutely im-
perative that President Johnson
appoint an emergency board to end
the strike. He said the stoppage
seriously impaired the movement
of military supplies and ammuni-
tion destined for our forces in
Vietnam.

In his new package Johnson ear-s
marked $480 million in, economic
assistance to fight "the other war"
in South Vietnam. However, there
was a hint amid concern over thej
recent Communist assault on Viet-
namese cities and the Korean
crisis that the President may seek
more foreign aid later.
"Developments around the world
are changing rapidly from day to
day," White House assistant Jo-,
seph A. Califano Jr. told newsmen.
"In light of this it may be neces-
cary to request additional funds
for Vietnam, - Korea and other
places."<
Opposes Korean Aid
Sen.? Allen J. Ellender (D-La),
;aid he opposes giving South Korea
another $100 million. As senior'
member of the Senate appropria-
tions subcommittee with juris-
diction over foreign aid, he could'
have a key role in determining
whether Congress grants the re-
quest.
The economic aid for Vietnam
is "just as vital to our ultimate
success" as battlefield victory,
Johnson stated. "We will pursue
these constructive programs in
Vietnam with the same energy and
determination with which we resist
aggression."
The $480 million for Vietnam,
about the same as this year'sout-
lays, is intended for a variety of
activities ranging from stemming
inflation to helping refugees,
boosting farm output, increasing
schooling and promoting industry.
Rock Bottom Request
The White House billed John-
son's foreign aid request as the
lowest ever. However, this was in
terms of the annual Foreign As-
sistance Act appropriation, and
there are other ways in which the
United States extends help to some
90 countries around the world.
The total of proposed economic
aid type programs in the Presi-
dent's budget for fiscal 1969 is
$4.23 billion, up from this year's
$3.98 billion.

WASHINGTON (A') -George C.
Wallace formally unveiled his
third party candidacy for presi-
dent yesterday, saying he offers
the voters "a real choice.
"I fully think we can win," he
said.
The 48-year-old former Ala-
bama governor told reporters he
stands for an end to lawlessness,
against federal interference with
the states and with the free en-
terprise system, and favors a tough
foreign policy including winning
allied support for the U.S. effort
in Vietnam.
Will Not Withdraw
Declaring his candidacy is ir-
revocable and will not be with-
drawn as it was four years ago,
Wallace said he is running to ful-
fill a pledge to Alabama voters
because, "I don't think there is!
going to be 10 cents worth of dif-
ference" between President John-
son and the Republican nominee.
"Even if we lost, we'd be no
worse oi2," ne said. "We have all
to gain and nothing to lose. I
fully think we can win in the
electoral college."
Asked which party he thinks he
will hurt most, Wallace said in
the South he will hurt the Repub-
licans by splitting opposition to
the Johnson administration.
Will Hurt Democrats
But in the country as a whole,
he said, "the great mass of sup-
port, that supports us have been
those who have traditionally sup-
ported the Democratic party."
Sen. Charles H. Percy (R-Ill.)
said Wallace's political strength
"is surprisingly stronger than I
thought it was." He said Wallace
might draw enough support to
deprive the major candidates of a
majority of the vote and thus
force the election into the House
of Representatives.
Senate Democratic leader Mike
Mansfield of Montana said "I
think it will help the Democrats."
Wallace was asked what he
realistically thinks his chances are.
He replied that while "the odds
have not been fully in favor of a
new party movement in the past,

the odds will be better as the
campaign progresses."
He noted that in a three cor-
nered race a candidate could cap-
ture a state's electoral votes with
only 34 per cent of the total, and
the entry of a peace oriented
fourth party would reduce this
further.
Wallace, who has been an active
champion of states rights and
segregated schools, observed that
"If I were the president I could

SAIGON (A) - The South Viet-
namese government has allotted
$5.08 million to its National Re-
covery Committee to repair some
of the damage wrought by the
current Communist offensive. This
means a disruption in the govern-
ment's shaky plans to win over
the nation's 17 million people.
Part of the money will come
from the U.S. government. But
most of it will have to come from
a paring down of current South
Vietnamese programs such as the
all important pacification effort,
U.S. officials say. They point out!
that the U.S. aid program already'
is stretched to the limit.
Program's Cost
The new program's financing
represents about 25 per cent of
planned nonmilitary expenditures
by the government in 1968.
The Communist offensive, which
began Jan. 30, has brought major
destruction to scores of South
Vietnamese cities and towns,
meaning a drop in 1968 of expect-
ed tax income and a further strain
on the government's programs.
The National Recovery Com-
mittee, formed a few days after
the Communist attacks began, is
headed by Vice President Nguyen
Cao Ky. It has held daily meet-
ings and its plans still are in-
complete.
Additional Refugees
Basically, however, it plans to
strike first at the refugee problem.
The fighting has added 300,000
refugees to the 700,000 already liv-
ing in temporary refugee camps
around the country. About half
of the 300,000,ehowever,nare ex-
pected to move back into their
own homes as soon as the fighting
ends.j
A government spokesman said
architects already are at work
mapping out plans to rebuild the
most heavily damaged cities, in-
cluding the elimination of slums.
The committee's first programs
appear to be concentrated in
Saigon. More than 2,500 revolu-1

George C. Wallace
care less what kind of school sys-
tem the people of Virginia or any
other state have."
Questioned about Vietnam, Wal-
lace called this "a most compli-
cated and complex matter," and
said, "I woua want to see if tere
could not be a military solution
to the promiem." He added, *-1
would lean heavily on the Joint
Chiefs of Staff" but would re-
spect civilian control of the de-
fense establishment.
He called for "a national lead-
ership which defends, not de-
stroys, the right of ownership of
private property" and said "so
called civii rignts laws are an
attack on the property laws and
local government."

tionary development pacification
cadres have been brought into the
city to help collect garbage, dis-
tribute rice and care for refugees.
No other major programs have
been firmed up, but officials say
plans are being drawn.
A government spokesman as-
serted Thursday that the recovery
program would not disrupt pres-
ent government programs. He said
all programs planned under the
nation's $20 million budget for
1968 will go ahead as scheduled.
American sources disagreed. Said
one U.S. official: "They're going
to have to cut back some things
in view of these short range pro-
grams. The pacification program

Hurt Pacification Plans

is being reviewed and refugee re-
settlement as well."
Until the present crisis, refugee
officials had predicted 1968 would
be the first year in which refu-
gee resettlement exceeded the
number of new refugees. This is
unlikely to happen now.
Seasoned observers are likely
to be wary of the government's
new attempt to win over its peo-
ple. In the past, pacification pro-
grams have come and gone.
Pacification officials claim that
since the recent attacks have
been concentrated in the cities,
there won't be a great effect on
the pacification program in the
countryside.

THURSDAY and FRIDAY
GORKY TRILOGY:
director, Mark Donskoy, 1939
In My Apprecenticeship, part 2 of the Gorksy
Trilogy, Donskoy's humanity shines through
surrounding poverty as the young writer-to-be
goes out into the world.
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