100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 06, 1968 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-01-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I "MMMMM

PAGE EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, JANUARY 6,1968

PAGE EIGHT TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY, JANUARY 6,1968

REACT TO PROPOSAL:
Papers Urge Bomb Halt

To

Test Peace Prospect

U.S. Offers
To Finance
Retraining
Project To Involve
300 Priyate Firms,
1200 Unemployed
WASHINGTON (/P) -The gov-
ernment is offering $45 million in
job training money to 300 firms
if they will promise to use it to
train and then hire some 12,000
hard core unemployed poverty vic-
tims.

NEW YORK (P-Many Amer-
lean newspapers urged the John-
son administration yesterday to
halt the bombing of North Viet-
nam as a test of the latest Hanoi
announcement on the prospect of
peace talks.
Others suggested that Washing-
ton should adopt a wait and see
attitude.
The papers expressed their views
concerning a statement by Foreign
Minister Nguyen Duy Trinh of
North Vietnam that his country
"will hold talks" if the United
States stops bombing and other
hostile acts against the North.
'Time Clear'
"In our view," said the New
York Times, "the time clearly has
come for President Johnson to
make a move to open talks. A halt
in the bombing is the way to be-
gin."
The Boston Globe took the view
that on the face of it the Hanoi
statement "is only the latest in a
long list of peace feelers that have
come to nought, so it is hard to
be optimistic," but added:
"Such an attitude would be
more warranted if Hanoi's since-
rity were tested immediately by
stopping the bombing of North
Vietnam unconditionally.
Large Dividends
The New York Post declared that
if the Communists advanced the
proposal as a propaganda device-
confident that it would evoke no
warm response in Washington-
their gamble has produced large
initial dividends.
The Chicago Sun Times, in its
first front page editorial since
1952, urged its readers to bombard
the White House with letters and
telegrams urging a halt in the
bombing of North Vietnam as a
means of persuading Ho Chi Minh
to negotiate.

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

"President Johnson has said the
United States will go more than
half way to find an honorable
peace," the newspapers said. "Ac-
tion would give credence to our
word."
Up to Something
The Nashville Tennessean com-
mented:
"Hanoi is up to something, and
it isn't clear whether it is soften-
ing its hard line position of old
or merely wants to put a little
psychological pressure on Wash-
ington. . . .
"So many previous bubbles have
burst, the best attitude is the one
prescribed by the Laotians: to
wait and see."

The Cleveland Press reacted
similarly, saying:
"We expect to get from Secre-
tary of State Dean Rusk in time
an honest report on the signifi-
cance of the Hanoi statement and
not the kind of 'it's nothing seri-
ous' brush off President Thieu in
Saigon gave instantly.
"But let's not get our hopes up
too high."
The Washington Post said: "If
leaders of North Vietnam are real-
ly serious about negotiations they
ought to be willing to discuss in
advance, through intermediaries if,
need be, what sort of settlement
they would envisage, or at least
what questions they would con-
sider 'relevant.' And so should we."

i
E
7
1

Congress To Study
Soldier Burial Costs

WASHINGTON (P)-A congres-
sional committee will inquire next
month into reports that many
American families must bear part
of the funeral costs for members
killed in action in Vietnam.
Chairman Olin E. Teague (D-
Tex.) of the House Veterans' Af-
fairs Committee said yesterday
his investigation might lead also
to new restrictions on burial in
national cemeteries "which are
filling up so fast that the problem
has become critical."
An Associated Press survey this
week showed that frequent allow-
ances fall short of the actual cost
to the families of service men.
Some families reported paying as
much as $700 over the allowance.
Some funeral directors inter-
viewed in the 10 state cost sam-

LBJ Finds New Progress
On 1969 Budget 'Pleasing'

pling said they could keep funeral
costs within allowance limits but
that the combined costs of both
funeral and burial often exceed the
allowances.
Some funeral directors said they
sometimes take financial losses in
an attempt to keep their fees with-
in the allowances.
Tom Johnson, a Junction City,
Kan., funeral official said he
"wouldn't want to profit on fun-
erals for these servicemen."
Appalling Allowance
A District of Columbia funeral
home official said he couldn't pos-
sibly stay within the. limits unless
he gave a serviceman "a pauper's
funeral."
"This is one of the first things
we intend to look into," Teague
said. "For years the responsibility
for these allowances has been
scattered all over Washington.
It's time to do something about
it."
The allowances are set by mili-
tary regulation on the basis of
average nationwide costs for es-
sential funeral and burial services.
Military sources said. They added
the allowances are intended to
"assist in defraying' funeral and
burial costs.
Grave Burden
The influx of war dead has
placed a heavy burden on national
and military post cemeteries in re-
cent years. Some already are full.
Arlington National Cemetery,
has been forced to place restric-
tions on burial there.
Once, any member or former
member of the military services
and his family could be buried at
Arlington. Now it is limited to men
dying while on active duty, retired
servicement pay, Medal of Honor
winners and veterans who already
have a wife or child buried in
the cemetery.

The project, part of Presidents
Johnson's push to get private in-
dustry to help solve the poverty
problem, is the first that requirest
the companies to guarantee jobst
at the end of the 15 month train-K
ing.
"The problem is to get these1
people placed" in jobs after train-j
ing, a Labor Department spokes-
man said. Previous Manpower Ad-.
ministration training projects
have not included a job guarantee.
The Manpower Administration
is still awaiting replies to invita-
tions to the 300 firms in five cities
to take part in the new experi-
mental project.
The cities are Boston, Chicago,
San Antonio, Los Angeles and
Washington, D.C.
Start Next Summer
A Labor Department spokesman
said the training projects will get
under way by early next summer
and that the government will
check up over a period of 18
months to see that the companies
live up to their pledge to hire the
trainees.
"What we are saying to those
companies, in effect, is 'You tell us
what it costs you, we'll give you
the money to do it, and then hire
the trainees," the spokesman said.
The estimated cost is $3,000 to
$3,500 to train each person.
Payroll Check
The government will keep hands
off the training program except
for later check of payrolls to see
how many of the trainees got jobs.
The spokesman said the project
will be the first experiment with
one of two main theories for train-
ing poor, uneducated and unem-
ployed ghetto resident, mostly Ne-
groes and other minority group
members.
One theory, with which the gov-
ernment is already experimenting,
is to let professional educators and
training firms bring poverty vic-
tims up to employability, and then
try to find jobs for them.
Different Theory
The other theory, applied in the
new program, is to persuade in-
dustry to get involved in both
training and hiring.
While industry proved during
the severe labor shortages in
World War II that it could train
"the completely unemployable" for
many jobs, the technique has not
been used in recent years, the
Labor Department spokesman said.
The letters of invitation to the
firms went out last week and it
is too early to tell what the re-
sponse will be, the spokesman said.

SATURDAY, JANUARY 6
Members of the Women's Research
Club: will meet Monday, Jan. 8, at,
8 p.m. in the West Conference Room,
Rackham Bldg. The subject of the
paper to be presented by Miss Marilyn
S. Berman is "Method of Speech Ther-
apy for the Aphasic Patient."
Sigma XI Lecture-Dr. Charles G.
Overberger, Chairman, Department of
Chemistry, University of Michigan,
"Polymers Having Catalytic Effects,"
Wed., Jan. 10, Rackham Amphitheater,
8:00 p.m.
General Notices
The Michigan Memorial-Phoenix Proj-
ect invites requests for faculty ie-
search grants to support research with-
in the scope of the term "peaceful uses
of nuclear energy." Typical areas in
which the Project is interestedsare:
Biological effects of radiation, Radia-
tion dosimetry, New uses of isotopes,
New tracer techniques, Direct conver-
sion of nuclear energy to electrical
energy, The fusion process, Plasmas as
related to controlled fusion, Radiation
chemistry, Nuclear weapons prolifera-
tion and disarmament, Psychological
attitudes toward nuclear energy haz-
ards, Evaluation of hazards to urban
populations from nuclear activities,
and Economic studies of nuclear ac-
tivities including power production.
New research ideas and pilot projects
are particularlyencouraged. The rela-
tionship to peaceful uses of nuclear
energy, however, must be clear. The
routine use of isotope tracer tech-
niques will not by itself justify sup-
port.
Requests for grants of $3,000 or less
are most appropriate. Grants may
cover equipment, supplies, research
assistance, and field trips. Applications
for these grants should be returned to
the Phoenix Project by Monday, Jan-
uary 29, 1968. Grants will be made by
April 1, 1968.
Application blanks may be obtained
from the office of the Phoenix Project
at the Phoenix Memorial Laboratory
on the North Campus or by calling
764-6213.
Doctoral Examination for: David Lee
Sigsbee, Classical Studies, Thesis: "The
Ridicule of the Stoic Paradoxes in
Ancient Satirical Literature," on Satur-
day, January 6, at 10 a.m. In Room
2009 Angell Hall,_Chairmary R. A. Pack.
j Placement

;j
.
,
i
7
',,
T
r (( '',
I
i
{
r
>
a
a
l
t

Digital Equipment Corporation, May- exper. Estrogens Lab., BS Chem. Mgr., visions. eustomer service facilities, per-
nard, Mass.-Computer Logic Design Anal. Dev., PhD Chem, 5-10 yrs. Mul- sonnel, warehousing, distribution, food,
Engrg., PDP computers, BSEE with over tiple openings for BS Chem. and trng. programs, advertising, acctg.
1 year in design of core memory hard- Clyde E. Williams Associates, Inc. and store display.
ware. Logic Circuit Module Design South Bend, Ind-Soils and materials Saint Paul Housing and Redevelop-
Engineer, BSEE and over 1 year in digi- engineer in Grand Bahamas. Civil en- neat Authority, St. Paul, Minn.-Civil
tal circuit design. grg. w/exper in water and sewage treat- Engr., design, specifications, inspection,
Kennedy, Jr., Memorial Hospital, ment in South Bend. testing, and operation.
Brighton, Mass.-Medical Technologist Saginaw General Hospital, Saginaw. Bell Aerosystems, Buffalo, N.Y.-Open-
Mead Jlhnson so. -Peansvill, d. ich.-Chief Pharmacist, Chief Physical in following fields: Mktg. Inte-
-aAssociate Sciesn tist-PhEarmacolog, IBA Therapist, Associate Director of School grated Syst. Engrg., Structural Sys t.
of Nursing, Medical Technologist, ASCP Engrg., Engrg. Serv., and Admin. Elec-
in Biol exper. In animal experimente- tromechanical and Electronics Syst.
tion, BA in Psych plus courses in ex-ogeligible.
perimental psych. Scientist, department City of Poughkeepsie, N.Y.-Jr. Plan- Engrg., Engineering Labs and Test
of pathology and toxicology, MA in ner and Senior Planner, model city Engrg., Manufacturing Project and
biol. sciencesrwith trng. in toxicology, program involvement.tSest. Mgmt., Product Assurance. Re-
or BA plus 5 yrs. exper. Robertson & Associates, Newark, N.Y. sarcMgiant. Pout Assurane. e-~
Council of Educational Facility Plan- -Management Consultant for national e .ps r e
ners, Tallahassee, Fla.-Executive Sec- engineering and mktg. consulting firm ays exper,
retary, 30-50 yrs., grad degree in edu- serving industrial, commercial, consunm- Nav'y Family Allow ance Activ-ity,
cation, admin. exper. er, and government agency clients. Cleveland. Ohio-Senior Professional
Local Organization-Social work po- Could locate anywhere, could be part Statistician, 15 sem hrs. in stat., and
sitions open to BA degrees, car neces- time, sell studies, expenses paid, and 3 yrs. in stat. res.
sary, professional positions open to percentage of studies sold. Engrg., Phys., Engineering Placement Meeting: No.
Catholics. of Chem. degrees w bus. exper. or 1. -"Engineering Opportunities." Dis-
Sarkes Tarzian, Inc., Bloomington, trng., several years in couns, product cussion of opportunities for current
Ind.-Chemist. Semi-Conductor. Device planning, mktg. res., sales or engrg. engineering graduates, demand, salaries,
Dev. Engr.- FId. Serv. Engr., Jr Engineer, Detroit Civil Service Commission, De- etc. First of four meetings. Primarily
Electronic Tech, TV Dev. and Syst, troit, Mich.-Senior Social Planning for seniors and graduate students, but
Engr, Broadcast and Syst. engr., Techni- Analyst, technical work implementing open to all interested. Professor J. G.
cal Writer, Physicist, Maintenence, Cor- socio-economic federal programs. Soc. Young. January 8, 4:00 p.m. in Room
porate Paymaster, asst. Broadcast Engr., or behavioral sei. degree, soc. research 229, West Engineering Building, and
Announcer. techniques, experience. 7:30 p.m. in Room 311, West Engineer-
Ayerst Laboratories Inc., Rouses Pt., Marshall Field & Co., Chicago, Ill.- ing Building. (Afternoon and evening
N.Y.-Ophthalamics, PhD Pharmacy, positions in eight merchandising di- meetings will be the same)

NEEDS

CI4F

Al iligani

4

COME TO A MEETING

Bureau of Appointments, 2200 S.A.B.,
hours 8:30-12 - 1:30-4:30. 12 Hours
necessary for eligibility to register and
make use of services at Bureau. Inter-
view season begins Jan. 15, please bring
your resumes up to date, register now
with the Gen. Division for interviews,
employers expect to see resumes on all
candidates before the interview. For
mailing lists of dates of interview
visits be sure we have your current
address, any changes are not automatic,
you must notify us yourself. Feel free
to come in and brouse through current
listings of jobs received by mail and
phone, listingsof government, bus, and
industry literature for interviews.
Current positions received by General
Division, Call 764-7460 for further in-
formation.

MONDAY, JAN. 8 at 4:15 P.M.
or

TUESDAY, JAN. 9 at

7:15 P.M.

lmmm 41P
d L.1
aM r--M A A. A A.
ty

420 MAYNARD ST.
Or See SUE SCHNEPP-Editorial Staff
JEANNE ROSINSKI-Business Staff

SAN ANTONIO, Tex. ()-Presi-
dent J o h n s o n, still plodding
through the 1969 budget, said yes-
terday he is pleased with progress
on it.
He has met with a stream of of-
ficials and advisors at his office in
the federal building in Austin and
at his ranch 65 miles away.
So Far
"He told me he is pleased with
the progress on the budget so far,"
said the President's press secre-
tary, George Christian.
Christian made no estimate of
how much of the budget work
Johnson will take back to Wash-
ington with him, or when.
ORGAN IZATION
NOTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officially
recog ized and registered student orga-
nizations only. Forms are available in
room1011 SAB.
Bach Club meeting, Jan. 10, 8 p.m.
Guild House, 802 Monroe, listening,
talking, etc. For further information
call 769-1605,
** *
Art Print Loan: All students who re-
newed their prints for the winter
semester and have not paid, bring
your money in to 1011 SAB.

Thursday, Poverty Program di-
rector Sargent Shriver, Veterans
Administration Chief William
Driver, Budget Director Charles
Schultze and his assistant, Charles
Zwick met with Johnson.
Responding to a question, Chris-
tian said he knew of no talk be-
tween Johnson and Shriver about3
Shriver's resigning.
"That wasn't the purpose of the
visit," Christian said.
Shriver gave the President a
report on OEO progress in whichi
he said the war against poverty
achieved serious bipartisan sup-
port throughout the, country in
1967.
Strongest Support
He called the Economic Oppor-
tunity Act of 1967, from which
Congress sharply trimmed funds,
"the strongest congressional sup-
port yet for the war on poverty."
A solid majority of both parties
voted to continue the OEO and its
programs through fiscal 1969,
Shriver said.
Secretary of Health, Education
and Welfare John Gardner report
that more than 7.5 million Amer-
icans are now being trained for
skilled jobs through federally sup-
ported vocational and technical
education programs, an increase in
enrollment of 600,000 vocational
students over the last school year.

i

"

-..

.

WORSHIP

I

SAVE
AT
ULBICHYS
ANN ARBOR'S FRIENDLY BOOKSTORE

i
i
I

I'

I I

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Phone 662-4466
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Ministers: Ernest T. Campbell, Malcolm G.
Brown, John W. Waser, Harold S. Horan
SUNDAY
Worship at 9:00, 10:30 a.m., and 12:00 noon.
Presbyterian Campus Center located at the
Church.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Ave.
Dr. Erwin A. Goede, Minister
Phyllis St. Louis, Minister of Education
9:20 and 11:00 a.m.-Service and Church
School Service. Sermon Topic: "Seeking a
Tempo," Dr. and Mrs. Ernst W. Allen.
BETHLEHEM UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
423 S. Fourth Ave.
Telephone 665-6149
Pastors: E. R. Klaudt, Armin C. Bizar,
W. C. Wright
9:30 and 10:45 a.m.-Worship Services.
9:30 and 10:45 a.m.-Church School.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
1511 Washtenaw
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
'ifred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 9:45 and 11:15 a.m.-Services.
Sermon: "More Than Conquerors."
Sunday at 11:15 'a.m.-Sunday Class-"Ro-
mans."
Sunday at 6:00 p.m.-Gamma Delta Supper-
Program, the Rev. Ronald Astalos, speaker.
Wednesday at 8:30 p.m.-Chapel Assembly.
Wednesday at 10:00 p.m.-Midweek Devotion.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
512 E. Huron
James H. Middleton, Minister
Cleo Boyd, Associate Minister
Ronald Tipton, Campus Minister
SUNDAY
10:00 a.m.-Worship Service.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
SUNDAY

LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
National Lutheran Council
Hill St. at S. Forest Ave.
Dr. H. O. Yoder, Pastor
SUNDAY
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Worship Services.
HURON HILLS BAPTIST CHURCH
Presently meeting at the YM-YWCA
Affiliated with the Baptist General Conf.
Rev. Charles Johnson
761-6749
9:30 a.m.-Coffee and Conversation.
9:45 a.m.-U. Fellowship Bible Discussion.
11:00 a.m.-"The Church's Commission -
Memorial or Mandate?"
7:00 p.m. - Missionary Shirley Ackerman,
Haiti,
8:30 p.m.-College and Careers Fellowship.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State and Huron Streets
663-0589
Dr. Raymond H. Saxe, Pastor
Morning Services-8:30 and 11:00 a.m.
9:45 a.m.-Sunday School and Alpha Omega
Fellowship.
6:00 p.m.-Training Hour-Classes for al
ages.
7:00 p.m.-Gospel Services.
Wednesday Prayer Meeting at 7:30 p.m.
If it's Bible, you want, come to Grace Bible-
Fundamental, Pre-Millenial, Biblical.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
1236 Washtenaw
Donald Postema, Minister
10:00 a.m.-Worship Service. Sermon: "Here
We Go Again."
11:00 a.m.-Coffee and Conversation in the
lounge.
7:00 p.m.-Worship Service. Sermon: "Chris-
tian Behavior."

Transportation furnished for al
NO 2-2756.

services-Call

THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgewood
Across from Ann Arbor High
Roy V. Palmer, Minister
SUNDAY
10:00 a.m.-Bible School.
S11 :00 a.m.-Regular Worship.
6:00 p.m.-Evening Worship.
WEDNESDAY
7:30 p.m.-Bible Study.

PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST CHURCH
Southern Baptist Convention
1 131 Church St.
761-0441
Rev. Tom Bloxam
9:45 a.m.-Sunday School.
11:00 a.m.-Morning Worship.
6:30 p.m..-Training Union.
7:30 p.m.-Evening Worship.

S'

I

You will find, our store
specially equipped to supply

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH AND
WESLEY FOUNDATION
At State and Huron Streets
Phone 662-4536
Hoover Rupert, Minister
Eugene Ransom, Campus Minister
Bartlett Beavin, Associate Campus Minister
SUNDAY
9:00 and 11:15 a.m.-Worship Services. Dr.
Rupert: "Confronting the Curse of Cyni-
cism."
6:00 p.m.-Chapel Meditaations.
6:15 p.m.-Fellowship Supper, Pine Room.
7:00 p.m. - Fellowship Program, Wesley
Lounge. "Overview of American Policy,"
Dr. William Zimmerman, Political Science
Department.
WEDNESDAY
12:10 p.m. - Holy Communion-Common
Meal, Pine Room. Out in time for 1:00
p.m. classes.
6:00 p.m.-Wesley Grads Supper, Pine Room.
7:00 p.m.-Wesley Grads Program, Wesley
Lounge.
ST. AlDEN'S EPISCOPAL CHAPEL
(North Campus)
1679 Broadway
9:00 a.m.-Morning Prayer and Holy Corn-
~ uni. -
er A n1REW'S EPSICOPAL CHURCH

t

:. ,
f"- .

you with LAW

case

books

and suppl

ies.

Our LAW section

11

11

is staffed by law students
to assist you.

CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William
Rev. Terry N. Smith
9:15 and 11:00 a.m.-Sermon Topic: "The
Importance of Forgetting."

I i

I II

I

I{

i

I

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan