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February 03, 1968 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-02-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE SIX

THE MICHTIGAN D AILY'

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SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 1968

9

Sinking Cagers
Northwestern Put to Test
In Pass-Fail Showdown

Battle

Soaring

Odds,

Grayle Howlett
Nf

4

By The Associated Press
They start separating the front,
runners from the potential route
performers in the Big Ten basket-
ball race today as four once-
beaten contenders are involved in
two of the day's five conference
games.

I

Big Ten Standings

Northwestern
Iowa
Ohio State
Wisconsin
Illinois
Purdue
Indiana

4
.3
3
3
2
2
2

1
1
1
1
1
2
2

.800
.750
.750
.750
.667
.500
.500

All closely pursuing pacesetting
Northwestern, 4-1, Wisconsin and
Ohio State match 3-1 records at
Columbus, Ohio, and Iowa, 3-1,
invades Illinois, 2-1, in a regional
TV matinee.
Northwestern has a return
match at Purdue, 2-2, in the only
other afternoon game. The Rick
Mount-powered Boilermakers seek
to avenge an 82-74 setback at
Northwestern last Saturday.
In other games tonight, two
winless clubs - invading Michi-
gan, 0-4, and host Minnesota,0-5
-tangle respectively with Michi-
gan State, 2-3 and Indiana, 2-2.
Northwestern, which must cope
with conference scoring coleader
Mount, averaging 29.8 points,
could yield the conference lead to
a pair of rivals by losing at Pur-
due.
The Badger - Buckeye contest
features 'three of the league's
seven top scorers. Coleader Joe
Franklin of Wisconsin sports a
29.8 average and Ohio State has
the No. four shooter in Bill Hosket
with 26.8, and another marksman
in Steve Howell with 19.8.
Additionally, Ohio State is the

'M' Primed
For Rematch
With MSU
By HOWARD KOHN
Tonight's basketball game not-
withstanding, Michigan's Dave
Strack (0-4) and Michigan State's
John Benington (2-3) share a
common history.
Both of their basketball nu-
merals have been retired at their
respective universities.
Strack's "33" was enshrined in
1966 when Cazzie Russell gradu-
ated from Michigan, and Ben-
ington's "16" was laid to rest in
1955 when Bill Russell graduated
from San Francisco.
Both have won Big Ten cham-
pionships, Strack's latest in 1966
and Benington's in 1967.
Unfortunately for those who
propagate the myth that the
Tonight's game with Michi-
gan State will be televised on
channel 9 at 8 p.m.
combined Michigan - Michigan
State forces could rule any con-
ference in the country (as they

----OFF BASE

JOE FRANKLIN

HEYWOOD EDWARDS

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I?

Michigan State 2 3 .400
VICHIGAN 0 4 .000
Minnesota 0 5 .000
TODAY'S SCHEDULE
Wisconsin at Ohio State (n)
Iowa at Illinois
Northwestern at Purdue
MICHIGAN at Michigan State
(n)
Indiana at Minnesota (n)

Big Ten's best scoring team, av-
eraging 94.5 points, 20 ahead of
Wisconsin's 74.5 pace. The Buck-
eyes also are tops in rebounding
with 49.8 per game against Wis-
consin's 37.8.
Illinois, surprising many experts
after being rocked by last win-
ter's slush fund scandal, confronts
Iowa with the league's best defen-
sive record, an average yield of
only 59.0. Hawkeye star Sam Wil-
liams is third best conference
scorer with a 28.5 average.

,:

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TON IGHT!

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have for some time the Big Ten),
this season's teams fall well be-
low past standards.
Tom (The Stick) Lick is typi-
cal of Benington's problem chil-
dren. Gangling, skinny, and rub-
bery, Lick nevertheless is the tall-
est man on the team.
In a pre-season press release,
Benington called Lick "the man
who's got to lead the team in re-
bounds." Lick doesn't. He doesn't
even play much anymore, sitting
out the entire 86-81 Michigan
State victory against Michigan
three weeks ago.
Heywood Edwards came off the
bench with less than 12 minutes
to go and with the Spartans
trailing to direct a comeback that
afternoon. Edwards has always
been a formidable nemesis for
Michigan.
But, according to Benington,
"he is physically unable to play
more than ten minutes a game."
Sophomore Set
Spelling Edwards will be either
Jim Gibbons or Lloyd Ward, two
sophomores who caught fire in
Michigan State's recent upset of
Northwestern.
Benington has been leaning
more toward his sophomores, aft-
er a hasty pre-season prediction

'M'-MSU. Win One for
The Sake of Winnin g
Some politician in a more lucid moment made the state-
ment to his listeners that it was time "for all of us to sit down
and see where we stand."
Tonight in East Lansing, it's time for the Michigan cagers to
pull up a chair.
I suppose it seems rather ludicrous to talk about tonight's
Michigan-Michigan State game as a pivotal clash, especially since
both teams are wallowing in the Big Ten depths. But tonight the
Wolverines can confirm or refute the oft-quoted statement, "We have
no place else to go but up."
It's easy to refer back to the so-called Cazzie Russell era when
every game took on national significance. Now, that period seems an-
TOM LICK cient history, not to mention irrelevant. The present Wolverine squad
has totally escaped the fall-out of Cazzie Russell.
Last year's banishment to the cellar was overlooked because
The Linezps most Wolverine fans were still blinded by the previous three
straight Big Ten titles. And playing for the last season in Yost,
MICHIGAN STATE the real house that Cazzie built, it would be sacrilegious for the
Lee Lafayette (35) F minus-Cazzie Wolverine cagers to win. Besides, it would have
Steve Rymal (15) F made a lot of prognosticators look'bad.
Heywood Edwards (33) C But now it's Cazzie Russell, New York Knicks, not Cazzie Russell,
John Bailey (12) G ex-Michigan star. Now it's the antiseptically clean All-Events Build-
Harrison Stepter (31) G ing, home of the Wolverines. Now -it's time for the Michigan cagers
MICHIGAN to do it on their own.
Bill Fra mann (54) F "Doing it on their own." has been somewhat of a problem this
Rudy Tonjanovich (45) F year, as witnessed by the cagers' 5-9 overall record, and 0-4 confer-
Dennis, Stewart (40) C ence slate. The tale of the tape can be quickly summarized by some
Jin Pitts (24) G post-game comments from head coach Dave Strack.
Ken Maxey (44) G After the Kentucky game: "Whatever I told them at half-
} :'': itime, I'm never going to tell them again."
old stand-bys like Lee Lafayette, After the Duke game: "I don't know what the key to this
Steve Rymal and John Bailey, he ball club is but I'd better find it before long."
has discredited many of the up- After the first Ohio State game: "My team should be dis-
perclassmen. appointed in itself.... I know we're not that bad."
When he took over for the After the second Ohio State game: "We played so hard and
Spartans at the opening of the so long only to lose it. I don't know what to say except that I am
1965-66 season, Benington spout- in despair over what happened out there."
ed optimism and bravado and Read 'em and weep, which must be some kind of a macabre pun
Michigan State finished secondto Dave Strack. The pattern is clear: the Wolverines have progressed
Now he contents himself with from just plain losing to losing with tragic overtones.
short innuendoes, as he did after After Ohio State destroyed Michigan 103-70 at Columbus two
the win over Michigan: "Vern weeks ago, the death knell was supposed to have sounded. Plans were
Johnson listens well . . . when rapidly being made to book something into the Events Building
he's on the bench." which would show a profit. But, despite being regionally televised,
Johnson, a scrappy second- the Ohio State rematch drew over 8.000 fans.
string junior guard, when con- And Michigan didn't disappoint. They attracted attention be-
fronted with the statement later, j cause they played well. Against a tall, powerful, and accurate Buck-

4

9",

BOBBY TCHERSON
Vibra-harpist with his Quintet

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Y

SATURDAY, February 3
8:30-Trueblood Aud.

that they won't be ready for Big replied, "Well, that's the
Ten play this year. Except for time anyone talks to me."
Michigan Basketball Stats

only eye squad the Wolverines showed they had talent.
Michigan fans have been described as being fickle. The fact

lales FG

Tickets:

$2.00 at Union desk

Rudy Tomjanovich
Dennis Stewart
jdim Pitts
Bob Sullivan
Ken Maxey
Dave McClellai,
Rich Bloodwo th
Willie Edwards
Mark Henry
Mike Maundrell
Scott Montross
Bill Fraumann
Team
MICHIGAN T10TALS
Opponents' Totals

I it
IQ)
10
IC
9
9

91-183
61-172
54-140
28- 90
27-89
15- 31
16-34
8 6-14
,8- 15
4- 9
1- 4
1- 3

14-
37.
51-
26-
18
4

FT RB PF Pts
-28 145 35 196
-48 91 39 159
-75 72 27 159
-37 50 29 102
-25 36 22 72
7-8 27 17 37
- 5 10 7 36
3-6 9 7 15
2-2 6 8 18
3- 5 3 2 11
- 2 4 1 2
- 4 5 2 6
9-245 533 196 813
161--242 527 177 853

Ave
19.6
15.9
15.9
10.2
7.2
4.1
4.0
1.8
2.5
1.5
0.5
1.2
81.3.
85.3

is, traditionally Wolverine fans aren't anything. They nod quiet
assent in victory and get up and leave in defeat. But last Sat-
urday they showed emotion and a true understanding of basket-
ball, or, at least, of refereeing. And I'm sure they vowed to come
back.
Tonight the Wolverines must show whether losing is a habit.
There might be a better place for it, as the Spartans have been
practically invincible at Jennison Field House for the past three
seasons. Admittedly the game won't be for the Big Ten title and it's
rather doubtful that Michigan will be playing a game with that
much importance the rest of the season.
The game will be locally televised on Channel 9, so, basket-
ball fans, let's all pull up a chair before the tube and see where
we stand.

UAC

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10 322-784 16
10 346--787

I wakh,

THE SPREAD-EAGLE OF TECHNOLOGY
AT GRUMMAN
Ranges from inner to outer space
Grumman has special interest for the graduating engineer and scientist seeking the widest spread of technology for his
skills. At Grumman, engineers are involved in deep ocean technology...engineers see their advanced aircraft designs
proven daily in the air over Vietnam, and soon... in outer space, the. Grumman LM (Lunar Module) will land the astro-
nauts on the lunar surface. Grumman, situated in Bethpage, L.I. (30 miles from N.Y.C.), is in the cultural center of
activity. Universities are close at hand for those who wish to continue their studies. C.C.N.Y., Manhattan College, New
York University, Pratt Institute, Columbia University, State University at Stony Brook, Polytechnic Institute of Brook-
lyn, Hofstra University and Adelphi College are all within easy distance. The surroundings are not hard to take. Five
beautiful public golf courses are in Bethpage-two minutes from the plant. White sand beaches stretch for miles along
the Atlantic (12 minutes drive); The famed sailing reaches of Long Island Sound are only eleven. miles away.
The informal atmosphere is.a Grumman tradition, matched by an equally hard-nosed one of turning out some of the
free world's highest performance aircraft systems and space vehicles.To name a few...

Engineers, Mathematicians:
you should
consider a career
withNSA.

LM-Lunar Module
to land the astronauts
on the lunar surface

... if you are stimulated by the prospect
of undertaking truly significant
assignments in your field, working in
its most advanced regions.
... if you are attracted by the
opportunity to contribute directly and
importantly to the security of our nation.,
.. if you want to share optimum
facilities and equipment, including one
of the world's foremost computer/ EDP
installations, in your quest for a
stimulating and satisfying career.
The National Security Agency is
responsible for designing and
developing "secure" communications
systems and EDP devices to transmit,
receive and process vital information.
The mission encompasses many
aspects of communications, computer
(hardware and software) technology,
and information recording and storage
. .. and provides a wealth of career
opportunities to the graduate engineer
and mathematician.
ENGINEERS will find work which is
performed nowhere else ... devices
and systems are constantly being
developed which are in advance of any
outside the Agency. As an Agency
engineer, you will carry out research,
design, development, testing and
evaluation of sophisticated, large-scale
cryptocommunications and EDP
systems. You may also participate in

related studies of electromagnetic
propagation, upper atmosphere
phenomena, and solid state devices
using the latest equipment for
advanced research within NSA's fully
instrumented laboratories.
MATHEMATICIANS define,
formulate and solve complex
communications-related problems.
Statistical mathematics, matrix algebra,
and combinatorial analysis are but a
few of the tools applied by Agency
mathematicians. Opportunities for
contributions in computer sciences and
theoretical research are also offered.
Continuing your Education?
NSA's graduate study program may
permit you to pursue two semesters of
full-time graduate study at full salary.
Nearly all academic costs are borne by
NSA, whose proximity to seven
universities is an additional asset.
Salaries and Benefits
Starting salaries, depending on
education and experience, range from
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follow as you assume additional
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of Federal employment without Civil
Service certification.
Another benefit is the NSA location,
between Washington and Baltimore,

which permits your choice of city,
suburban or country living and allows
easy access to the Chesapeake Bay,
ocean beaches, and other summer and
winter recreation areas.
Campus Interviow Dates:
FEB. 12
Check with the Placement Office now
to arrange an interview with NSA
representatives on campus. The
Placement Office has additional
information about NSA, or you may
write: Chief, College Relations Branch,
National Security Agency,
Ft. George G. Meade, Maryland
20755, A TTN: M321. An equal
opportunity employer, M&F.
. o
national
security

4

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EA-6A Intruder-
All-weather, tactical,
electronic weapon system
PG ( )-57-ton
Hydrofoil Seacraft

agency

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PX15-4-Man Deep
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