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January 06, 1968 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-01-06

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"MMMMON

PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, JANUAR'Y' 6, 1968

PAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY, JANUARY 8,1968

FRATERNITY

Cagers Ope

Conference Scramble

Purdue BatI
Indiana to 1

tles OSU;
)efend Title
Indiana (6-3), and Iowa (5-4) at
Northwestern (5-4) tonight.
Indiana fared better than the
other defending co-champion,
Michigan State, in non-loop play,
but both ended outside campaign-
ing with three straight setbacks.
Last season, Indiana and Mich-
igan State shared the Big Ten
title at 10-4. The Hoosiers repre-
sented the conference in NCAA
tourney play and succumbed to
Virginia Tech 79-70 in their first
Mideast Regional start.
The title traffic may be terrific
this season with as many as four
or five top contenders-and you
name them-liable to be still alive
when the campaign ends March 9.-
Many Contenders
It's difficult to count out a
single entry, except possibly Min-
nesota whose defending scoring
champion, Tom Kondla, is shoot-
ing at a modest 16.7 pace com-
pared with his title-winning 28.31
last season.
Still, the Gophers' feeble 3-7
tuneup record includes setbacks
by such national powerhouses as

I

JOE FRANKLIN CHUCK NAGLE
BIG TEN SWIMMING:
Hoosiers Favored
To Retain Crown

Rudy, Wolverines Meet
Bothersome Badgers
By BILL LEVIS
Michigan's brusied and battered cagers open their Big Ten
season today as a television attraction.
The Wolverines, who have lost to four of the top rated teams in
the country this season, tackle Wisconsin in Madison at 4:15 p.m.
(EST) in the Big Ten Game of the Week to be televised locally on
Channel 4.
The Badgers, who boast one of the top non-conference records
at 6-3, are led by a trio of 6'5" gunners who give Wisconsin an
awesome frontline. Although they are not big, forwards Joe Franklin
and Chuck Nagle along with center Jim Johnson have guided the
Badgers to a non-conference record second only to Ohio State.
Michigan coach Dave Strack especially fears the balanced scor-
ing of the three standouts. "Nagle is a tough shooter and Franklin
is consistently good. And that Johnson is really coming along."
String Bean Franklin
Franklin, a string bean shooter, at 170, has been the nemesis
of the opposition all season. The senior, who led Wisconsin in re-
bounding the past two years, has turned into quite a shooter this
season. He has increased his average seven points to 21.6 this year,
making almost 54 per cent of his attempts. On the boards, Franklin
continues to pull down rebounds at a rapid rate.
Wisconsin coach John Erickson, who has been pleasantly surprised
with Franklin's performance, said "Joe has had a great year thus
far. He is one of the best players in Wisconsin history and is cur-
rently averaging 16 rebounds per game. In the Quaker City Tourna-
ment last week, he led in rebounding with 50 in three games, pulling
i-down 20 in one contest."
t- d Frankline, who also won an all-tournament berth, scored 63
n points in Philadelphia Unfortunately the Badgers were only able
ne to win one of the games in the City of Brotherly Love losing to both
Temple and Duquense after beating Pennsylvania in the opener 86-67.
n- At the other forward spot Erickson will start hotshot Nagle
ls who led Wisconsin in scoring last season with a 19.3 average. The
'ly junior, who is scoring about three points less per game this year, has
rd not started as fast as last year according to Erickson.
nd The man who has made the biggest difference in the Wisconsin
m- attack this season has to be Johnson, according to his coach. John-
in son, who got off to a slow start last year, has started like a house on
fire this time around. The junior, who gives away quite a bit of
to height at center, still has managed to sting the nets for a 19-point
op average.

.f

RICK MOUNT

CHICAGO (P-The Big Ten's
63rd conference basketball season
begins today with a full slate for
a field which took its lumps all
the way down the line in outside
tuneup competition.
A featured opener on the five-
game program sends Rick Mount-
paced Purdue to Ohio State to-
night against a Buckeye club
which had the best record, 6-2,
in the somewhat stinging pre-
championship Big Ten fling.
The Big Ten has a current 48-,
41 non-conference record.
Purdue Has Classa
Purdue appeared the class of
t h e conference by startling
mighty UCLA before a dramatic
73-71 opening loss to Lew Alcin-
dor & Co., but injuries eventually
slowed the Boilermakers to 5-4
warmup mark.
Today's first league round also
includes Michigan State (4-4) at
Illinois (4-5) and the regionally
televised Michigan (4-5) at Wis-
consin (6-3) tilt as afternoon en-
counters, and Minnesota (3-7) at

UCLA and Houston, plus Drake,
Kansas State and Utah State.
Iowa Will Challenge
Iowa's invasion of Northwestern
pits two teams still in the jelling
stage even with stellar kingpins
in Hawkeye Sammy Williams and
Wildcat Terry Gamber. In the
Los Angeles Classic, Iowa got a
real baptism of fire playing three
successive overtimes.
The Hawkeyes beat sixth-rank-
ed Tennessee 64-59 in one over-
time. They lost to strong Wyom-
ing 94-97 in two overtimes and
then took third place with an
80-77 overtime shading of St.
Louis.
Illinois could be a conference
sleeper. The scandal-stung Illini
yielded an average of only 62.7
points with sharp defensive tac-
tics against a string of strong
non-loop foes, including second-
ranked Houston.
VE
T
NDLY BOOKSTORE

AA
A
ULIH
ANN ARBOR'S FR IE

By ROBIN WRIGHT
If Indiana's swimming coach
Doc Counsilman's prediction about
the number of absences at today's
Big Ten Swimming Relays due to
flu would stay true all season,
Michigan could win the Big Ten
title, or at least keep coach Gus
Stager's record of never placing
lower than second in the Big
Ten true.
But the Indiana boys will no
doubt recover, and will no doubt
Win the Big Ten title again this
year. Their diving alone, being
seriously challanged only by Mich-
igan, makes it impossible for them
to place below first this year and
next year. The three outstanding
divers include two juniors and a
sophomore, Jim Henry, one of the
top divers in the country.
Counsilman considers their best
event to be the breast-stroke.
Their key swimmer is Dave Per-
kowski, who placed second behind
Michigan's Paul Scheerer in the
Big Ten last year.
The credentials of the boys
swimming Indiana's "not quite
as hot" event - backstroke -
swum by Charles Hickcox and Bill
Utley, include two Pan-American
championships and an NCAA title.
"They should be a threat this
season to any Big Ten opponent."
Indiana's distance swimmers and
sprinters are established winners.
Bob Windle was a member of the
team that set the NCAA 800 Yard
Freestyle Relay record last sea-
son and also was an Olympic
swimmer in the 1500 meter event.
Bill Brurell, a sophomore sprinter,
placed first in the Big Ten fresh-
man events last year.
Although Michigan has only a
small chance to beat out Indiana
for the Big Ten title, Counsilman
considers us his main threat.
Michigan coach Gus Stager ex-
plains the dilemma of this year's
team, "Although our graduation
losses are unusually heavy this
year, and our whole team is an
unkown quantity, the squad's at-

titude is terrific. They are spiri
ed and willing to work. We kno
we're strong in the butterfly, am
that in the breastroke we ha
a problem."
Only two of the returning swin
mers made the 1967 NCAA fina
Both are juniors and butterf
specialists. Tom Arusoo took thi
in the Big Ten 200 yard event ar
fourth in the NCAA, while tean
mate Lee, Bisbee was eighth
the nationals.
The sophomores are the key
the 1968 team. One of Stager's t
men is Juan Bello, who swin
just about everything, but willl
concentrating on distance fre
style. Bob Harmony, a high scho
All-American, along with B
Kircher have been leading t
sophomore sprinters, but Harmon
has been recently side-track
with a case of double pneumon
and will not see action for t
first part of the season.
The bright lights of this year
team are rounded out by dive:
Captain Fred Brown and juni
Jay Meaden. Both placed in t
top ten in the 1967 NCAA of
and three meter events.
Michigan State is the only oth
team with any real strength
the cori'ference this year. For
time they were considered equ
or better then Michigan's tea
on the basis of a strong freshm,
team. But due to heavy grade ai
graduation losses this year t
race will not be as close betwe
the two Michigan schools.

ms
be.
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~ol
ob
he
ny
ed
ja,
he
r's
rs,
or
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one
ier
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en

6

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MICHIGAN PO S. WISCONSIN
(20) Bob Sullivan F Chuck Nagle (11)
(45) Rudy Tomianovich F Joe Franklin (25)
(40) Dennis Stewart C Jim Johnson (35)
(24) Jim Pitts G Mike Carlin (20)
(44) Ken Maxey G Mel Reddick (10)
Erickson said, "That like all the Badgers, Johnson is not big
and strong. We like to think that we make up for our lack of size
with our quickness."
And in the backcourt Erickson has two fast quards in Mike
Carlin and Mel Reddick, who are both averaging around nine point. M
a game.
Reddick, who was one of the few bright spots in the most dismal
Wisconsin football season in history, has just recently broke into
the starting lineup.
The sophomore, who led the freshmen team with a 28-point
average last year "was slow coming around because he missed our
fundamental drills," Erickson reported. "Like most players who miss h
some practice, Mel has been either really good or really bad. He's a
dynamic player and has lots of possibilities."
Carlin, while not a big scorer, is a steady guard and excellent
floor leader, according to Erickson.
2 Regular Season Losses
The Wolverines beat the Badgers in the Los Angles Classic last
year but lost twice to Wisconsin during the regular season. One of
those defeats was a 80-79 heart breaker which ended when reserve
center Ted Voight sunk the winning basket at the gun.
Erickson is particularly concerned about the addition of Rudy
TomJanovich to the Michigan starting lineup this season. Tomjano-
vich leads the Wolverines in both scoring and rebounding with a
19.6 average and 138 rebounds in nine games. Erickson noted," We're
sort of anxious to see him play after all we have heard about him."
Erickson then swung his comments around to the'Big Ten race
which opens today. "We have 10 good teams in the conference but
I don't know if we have any great ones."

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Basketball Statistics

Tomjanuovich
Stewart
Pitts
Sullivan
Maxey
McClellan
Bloodworth
Edwards
Henry
Maundrell
Montross
Frauinann
Michigan Totals
Opp.'s Totals

FG
82
56
46
36
26
15
13
6
7
4
1
1
293
314

FGA RB
165 138
154 80
125 65
83 45
77 32
31 26
29 10
14 9
13 5
9 3
4 4
3 5
707 488
717 472

Ave.
19.6
15.5
15.2
10.7
7.7
4.6
3.7
1.8
2.6
1.5
0.5
1.2
82.0
86.2

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