100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 30, 1968 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-01-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY$ JANUARY 36, 1968

Cindermen Dominate Western Relays

TOMORROW!
ChARTER FLIGHTS

MASS MEETING
SIGN-UP and INFORMATION
MICHIGAN LEAGUE BALLROOM-7:00 P.M.

COME FOR COFFEE

A

: :

ONE N
Wednesday,

IGHT ONLY
January 31, 8:30 p.m.

RACKHAM LECTURE HALL
THICH NHAT HANH
Buddhist monk, Thich Nhat Hanh has two
primary responsibilities in South Vietnam:
one as director of the Youth for Social Ser-
vice Program for the United Buddhist
Church, the other as director of the Insti-
tute for Social Studies at Buddhist Uni-
versity. He thus has intimate contact with
the peasants throughout South Vietnam and
at the same time is close to the Buddhist
leadership in peace and social change.
Scholar, philosopher poet Thich Nhat
Hanh's poems are widely quoted in many
parts of the world and sung in Vietnam. He
has recently completed a world-wide mis-
sion in behalf of Vietnam meeting with such
American leaders as Senator Fulbright,
Martin Luther King and Secretary of De-
fense McNamara and is the author of the
book Vietnam: Lotus in a Sea of Fire.

By PHIL BROWN
New varsity records in four
events and near-record perform-
ances in numerous others high-
lighted the Michigan track team's
first indoor appearance of the
season Saturday.
Competing in the Western Re-
lays, traditionally the season
opener for the Wolverines, Mich-
igan athletes erased old marks in
the two-mile relay, triple jump,
two-mile run, and 60-yard low
hurdles, and equalled the record
time in the 60-yard highs.
Track coach Don Canham was
pleased by the Wolverines' dom-
ination of the meet. "We really
didn't go all out in the thing,"
he smiled. "We're trying to get
good workouts for the whole
team, getting our guys ready to
compete in the meets that count."
But the Wolverines are already
sporting excellent performances,
especially for this early in the
season. With normal progress be-
ing made throughout the indoor'
and outdoor schedules, the Michi-
gan thinclads could be unbeatable
by championship time.
Like a Broken Record
Paul Armstrong, Tom Kearney,
Alex McDonald, and Ron Kutsch-
inski turned the two-mile relay
into a rout with their 7:29.6
clocking. With Kutschinski run-
KEEP AHEAD
OF YOUR HAIR
" NO WAITING
* 7 BARBERS
"Headquarters fat Collegians"
THE DASCOLA BARBERS
Near Michigan Theatre

LARRY MIDLAM

ning the anchor leg in a blister-
ing 1:49.9, the quartet shaved .2
of a second off the best time
turned in last year by essentially
the same group.
In indoor competition last year
John Reynolds occupied the spot
now held by Armstrong, and the
team took second place in the
NCAA championship meet at
Cobo Hall. The foursome defeated
fine teams from Fordham and
Villanova, only to be edged out
for the title by a lightly-regarded
squad from Southern Cal.
A 48'8" effort by Warren Be-
chard in the triple jump bettered
the mark of 44'7" set by team-
niate Carl Flowers last season.
Flowers made his p r e s e n c e
known, however, turning in a
48'3" leap for second place, also
besting his old mark.
The two-mile run looked as

boring as most distance events place in the event in his first
when it started, but senior Jim long jump appearance since his
Dolan made his move at the half- high school days.
way mark and pulled steadily "Overall I thought we looked
away from the pack to win in pretty good," he added. "Our big
4:00.4. 3.6 seconds faster than problem now is finding a mile
Don McEwen's varsity record relay combination, and we'll be
time, recorded in 1952. working with a new group all
Junior Larry Midlam accounted week."
for the fourth new mark as he The performance of Michigan's
skimmed the 60-yard low hurdles mile relay team at Western was
in 6.8 seconds in both preliminary the real highlight of the meet, al-
and semifinal heats. Midlam's though it was not apparent when
performance scraped a mere .1 the race was run.
second off Tom Hendricks' 1956 Oversight
time. Larry Gagnon, handling the first
Midlam's low hurdle victory leg for the Wolverines' second en-
followed his win in the highs, giv- try, forgot to pick up a baton be-
ing him a clean sweep for the fore the race. The oversight was
meet. His time of :07.2 matched not noticed by officials, and Gag-
footballer Bennie McRae's record,
set in 1962. Senior sticks man
Nelson Graham followed Midlam
across the finish line to claim
second in the event.
Really Hurts srQK
Canham expressed dismay over
the failure of the distance medley
relay squad to finish its race. -
"I'm sure we would have won if
they hadn't dropped the baton," By The Associated Press
he said. NEW YORK - The MinnesotaI
The juggled exchange automat- Vikings traded their regular first
ically disqualified M i c h i g a n, round pick in the 1968 and 1969
marking the only real disappoint-
ment of the day for the Wolver- drafts to New Orleans yesterday
ines. for quarterback Gary Cuzzo, but
The coach was pleased by the still retained the special No. 1 pick
depth displayed by results in they acquired last year in the
other events. "Ron Shortt just trade that sent quarterback Fran
barely missed clearing 16 feet," Tarkenton to the New York
he pointed out. Shorttdid make Giants.
15'6", taking third behind East- Minnesota now has four quarter-
ern's Bill Barrett and Roland backs which means the Vikings
Carter of Michigan State. could decide to bypass UCLA's
Long, Not Broad Gary Beban, the Heisman Trophy
"Our broad jumping looked winning passer, in today's draft.
real good, too," Canham contin- The trade means that New Or-
ued. "Ira Russell is already close leans' now will pick seventh in
to 23 feet, and finished second. the draft instead of 59th. The
And Bob Wedge looked fine; he's Saints earlier had traded away
a real tough competitor." their draft picks in the first two
Wedge leaped 22'7" for fourth rounds of the joint selection by

non simp'y slapped the hand of
the second man in lieu of an ex-
change.
Meet officials had still not real-
ized that the team was running
without a baton when, at the com-
pletion of the third leg, anchor
man Taimo Leps, who had found
the missing baton and concealed it
with an arm, took a convincing
fake from his teammate and
steamed home in the middle of the
pack.
"We would have confessed if
the team had taken a place," re-
called Canham. "We just wanted
to complete the race for the time,
and they would have disqualified
the team if they had known we
iidn't have the baton."
both National and American Foot-
ball League teams.
NEW YORK - Outfielders
Goose Goslin and the late Kiki
Cuyler were voted unanimously
to baseball's Hall of Fame Sun-,
day by the Baseball Writers As-
sociation of America.
Goslin's single in the 1935 World
Series gave Detroit the world
championship over the Chicago
Cubs. He compiled a .316 lifetime
batting average while playing for
Washington, Detroit, and St.
Louis.
Cuyler, who died in 1950, drove
in the winning run for Pittsburgh
in the 1925 World Series.

I

I

e

Pro Standings
NBA

F.

I

I

This Weekend in Sports
Friday
TRACK-Michigan Relays at Yost Fieldhouse
HOCKEY-Michigan at Minnesota, Duluth
SWIMMING-Michigan at Wisconsin
Saturday
WRESTLING-Michigan Frosh in Events Building, 9:00 a.m.
WRESTLING-Pittsburgh at Events Building, 2:15 p.m.
TRACK-Michigan Relays at Yost Fieldhouse
GYMNASTICS-Minnesota at IM Gymnasium, 2:00 p.m.
BASKETBALL-Michigan at Michigan State
HOCKEY-Michigan at Minnesota, Duluth$
SWIMMING-Michigan at Minnesota

Philadelphia
Boston
Detroit
Cincinnati
New York
Baltimore

W L
37 15
34 16
27 26
24 26
25 29
20 31

Be-
Pct hind
.712 -
.680 2
.509 10'.
.480 12
.463 13
.392 16f2

Western Division
St. Louis 40 15
San Francisco 32 22
Los Angeles 28 23
Chicago 18 34
Seattle 15 38
San Diego 14 39

.741
.593
.549
.346
.283
.264

7-
10
20%
24
25

Yesterday's Games
No gaines scheduled.
Today's Games
Cincinnati vs. Detroit at New
Yoru
Baltimore at New York
Boston at Philadelphia
San Francisco at Chicago
Los Angeles at Seattle
NHL

A

East Division
W L T Pts
Montreal 23 14 9 55
Toronto 23 16 8 54
Boston 24 18 6 54
Chicago 21 15 12 54
New York 22 16 8 52
Detroit 19 21 8 46
West Division
Phii'phia 21 19 7 49
Minnesota 18 20 9 45
Los Angeles 20 23 4 44
St. Louis 17 21 8 42
Pittsburgh 17 23 7 40
Oakland 10, 29 10 30

A

IfV yure thinking about
going to work for,
an avertising agency..
We'll be on campus in about ten days.
And if you're lo.oking for some commonsense answers
to some commonsense questions, we're ready.
Questions like these:
What about my draft status?
What's the agency business really like?
What about money?
What will 1 do?
Shall I aim for Research?
Media?
Creative?
Account Executive?
How important are my grades?
If you're looking for Instant Success, however, you'd better skip us.
If you're interested in reality, maybe we ought to talk.
We're very interested in your activities on-and off-the campus.
So if you have examples of such activity, please bring them
with you to our meeting. You can sign up for an interview at the
Placement Office, as you probably know.
A few facts: we're the sixth largest advertising agency in the world.
We employ 1,700 people and serve 29 clients. (You'll find ihem listed below.)
We're headquartered in Chicago with other offices in New York,
Hollywood, Detroit, Montreal, Toronto, and London.

Yesterday's Games
No games scheduled.
Today's Games
Toronto at Montreal
SPORTS NIGHT EDITOR:
ANDY BARBAS
A band of
priests
numbering
263
has to
make every.
priest count!
We may be small but we feel
our impact is significant.
One reason may be that the
Paulists are, and always have
been, "communication-
minded." Many feel our mark
has been made with the printed
page and the spoken word.
Whether it be in Newman Cen-
ters, missions, parishes, infor-
mation centers, speakers plat-
forms or television, the Paulist
Priest tries to contribute a
"total self"to spread the Chris-
tian message.
His greatest assets are that he
is free to remain flexible in a
changing world ... free to de-
velop his own God-given tal-
ents to further his aims... and
free from. the stifling formalism
of past centuries.
Maybe you'd like to be #264?

GF
137
136
170
139
137
158
116
113
115
100
118
96

GA
101
103
140
133
123
156
107
138
144
113
137
139

Are we communicating?

U

Leo Burnett Company, Inc. - Advertising
Prudential Plaza, Chicago, Illinois 60601 . 312/236-5959

I

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan