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January 24, 1968 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-01-24

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24, 1968

PAOE SIX THE MIChiGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24, 1968

W NC .
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_____________________________11.i

ART BUHAL
Sunday, January 28
8:00-H ill Auditorium
Tickets: $1 .00-students
UAC at Union Desk

I
t.

HALL OF FAME:
Medwick Named To Shrine

THE VANDALS
AND THE
BROKEN

HEADS
... Phil Brown

IL

i

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By The Associated Press
NEW YORK - Joe "Ducky"
Medwick, the cocky, swaggering
batting leader of St. Louis' ram-
bunctious Gas House Gang, made
baseball's Hall of Fame in his
last time at bat in the writers'
election yesterday.
This was Medwick's last chance
to make the Hall of Fame on the
SADDLE BROOK, N.J. -Lee
MacPhail, general manager of
the New York Yankees, said
yesterday some players have
trouble remembering the team
finished ninth last season when
they come to discuss their con-
tracts.
"I talked with outfielder
Steve Whitaker the other day,"
MacPhail said, "and at the end
we were still quite a bit apart.
"As he left, Whitaker told me
I didn't have to worry about
anyone taking my heart for a
transplant operation because
it's not big enough."y
vote of the baseball writers be-
cause they vote only on players
active in the last 20 years. His
last season was 1948.
If he hadn't made it this time,
Medwick would have moved into
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I

time catching great of the Brook-
lyn Dodgers and a three-time
winner of the National League's
Most Valuable Player Award.
missed election by only eight(
votes.
"It's wonderful," said Medwick.'
"This completes my baseball ca-
reer. I've done everything else in
baseball. This was all that was
left," the former outfield great
added. "For one of the few times{
in my life I'm speechless."
Medwick's bat made consider-
able noise during a colorful careert
that spanned 17 National League
seasons. 10 of them with the
Cards and the others with the
Dodgers, New York Giants and
Boston Braves.
His career record includes a
.324 batting average and 2051
homers. Medwick still holds thej
NL mark for most doubles in one
season, 64. He set it in 1936.
Medwick got his nickname. be-
cause his walk resembles a duck's.1
He often verbally abused or chid-t

the old-timers group considered ed while playing in opposingI
by the Veterans Committee. teams' ball parks during his hey-
The former star Cardinal out- day with the Cardinals, touched
fielder was named on 240 of the off the celebrated fruit and vege-
283 ballots cast by writers who table shower in the final game of
have been members of the Base- the 1934 World Series against theo
ball Writers Association of Amer- Detroit Tigers.
ica for a minimum of 10 years. The incident developed after
It was necessary to get 213, or Medwick had barrelled into Tiger
75 per cent, of the votes for elec- third baseman Mary Owen. Theu
tion. Roy Campanella, the one- collision prompted spectators inf

the Tigers' park to throw fruit,
vegetables and newspapers at the
outfielder when he took his posi-
tion in the field in the sixth
inning.
Judge Kenesaw Landis; the
baseball commissioner, then re-
quested Medwick's removal to
stop the disturbance.
Lou Boudreau, former star
shortstop and manager of the
Cleveland Indians was third in
the balloting with 146 votes. Then
came Enos Slaughter. Ralph Kin-
er, Johnny Mize, and Allie Rey-
nolds.
Howe Voted to
Hockey Stars
NEW YORK -- Bobby Hull and
Stan Mikita, Chicago's high scor-
ing forwards, and defenseman
Bobby Orr of Boston were named
unanimously yesterday to the Na-
tional Hockey League's All-Star
team for the opening half of the
1967-68 season.
Three veterans players; right
winger Gordie Howe of Detroit
and goalie Johnny Bower and de-
fenseman Tim Horton of Toronto,
also made the first team in a
vote of the circuit's coaches.
Selected for the second team
were right winger John McKenzie
and left winger Johnny Bucyk of
Boston, center Mike Walton of
Toronto, defensemen Pierre Pilote
of Chicago and Gary Bergman of
Detroit and goalie Gump Worsley
of Montreal.
Howe, the league's career scor-
ing leader now playing in his 22nd
season with the Red Wings, drew
58 points.
Mikita tops the NHL in scoring
points with 53 followed by Hull
with' 50. Hull paces the circuit in
goals with 32.

The blossoming feud between the AAU and NCAA over control
of American track and field competition leaves me wondering just#
what the athletes are doing about the situation.
I can't help thinking that track stars, elevated by the press to a
uniquely glamorous position, must be taking careful note of the
fabulous salaries being claimed by standouts in other sports, and eye-
ing critically the constant air of mysterious confusion that pervades
their domain.
With this in mind, I decided to get the word on the situation
from the competitors themselves. Heady with dreams of finally
landing the year's really big scoop, I called Jim Whyrun, the
sensational miler.
"Give it to me straight, Jim," I barged into the mouthpiece.
"Are all you track stars going to turn pro?"
"Well, Mr. Brown," he began cautiously, "I don't know anything
about that, but I am thinking about asking for an increase in my travel
allowance to, say, 500 a week or so ....
This didn't sound like the pros to me, so I decided to try Jerry
Landgreen, the popular distance man from the West Coast.
"I understand you're a little fed up with the AAU-NCAA
thing," I said, hoping he'd pick up my thread.
"Well, Phil," he replied breathlessly, "we really don't have an
alternative right now. But I have been approached by a New York
syndicate that wants to establish a tour, and they've offered me
very generous contract."
"Oh, yeah . . . ?" I gulped, momentarily losing my poise.
Sure," he continued, "but I wish you wouldn't print that. It
might ruin my amateur standing, and then I couldn't get all
those trophies that I sell, er, decorate my house with."
Hot in pursuit of my big story, I nervously called Los Angeles,
and got through to ace pole vaulter Bob Seegreen.
"I've never heard of the track tour," he snapped in response to
my opening query. "What a drag ... traveling all over the world by
yourself, never knowing when you'd be getting another check. Besides
I'll make more money with the Hustlers."
"That's the new American Track Association franchise in
L.A.," he replied. "It'll be the greatest track team of all time-
all the boys from San Jose, Southern Cal, and I hear we've got
Gimme Greene, the Big Eight sprinter, too."
Wishing him a hasty "good luck," I called Greene.
"Well, man," he whispered, "it's like this: they made me a pretty
puny offer, man. Like only 20,0 G's, you know. And like I can make
that much on the tour running backwards, you know."
"I see," I answered intellectually. "Say, Gimmee, or Charlie, why
is it that so many of you guys' names have 'green' in them?"
"I really wouldn't know, man."
His soft voice was fading fast, so I hung up and decided to try
somebody from the management side.
Don Howl, high man for the AAU, violently denied the reports
of a pro movement. "It's absolutely insane," he whined. "These
boys wouldn't pass up the prestige and glory and Sports Illustrated
cover pictures that go with the Olympics, just for money and cars
and security and such temporary things."
"Besides," he continued, "if they don't compete in meets sanc-
tioned by the AAU, I'll ban them from every other form of competi-
tion. I know lots of important people," he screamed. "Senators, Con-
gressmen, advertising executives, HUAC . . .."
I put down the receiver quietly, his voice echoing in my ear.
Still hoping to get an authoritative word, I called Chris Schekel,
world-famous broadcaster for the highest-bidding network.
"I don't know about rival pro circuits for track stars," he said
in his inimitable deep nasal twang. But I've been practicing up on
my play-by-play announcing, just in case."
"Play-by-play announcing?" I asked. "For track?"
"Sure," he replied. "And you have to be quick. Would you like
to hear the latest addition to my bag?"
Curious, I consented.
"Here goes, then: He's at the tentwentythirtyfortyfiftysixty-
seventyeigthy ..

DUCKY MEDWICK IN 1942

"ARABS or ISRAELIS?
A DILEMMA IN THE
AMERICAN LEFT"
A DEBATE SPONSORED BY THE
ORGANIZATION OF ARAB STUDENTS
DAVID GUTMANN LARRY HOCHMAN
Assoc. Prof. Psychology, U of M Assoc. Prof. Physics, E.M.U.
Moderator: KAMAL IBRACHI
UNION BALLROOM, 7:30 P.M., WEDNESDAY, JAN. 24

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