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January 23, 1968 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-01-23

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PAGY BtK

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, JANUARY 3Y 1868

PAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY. JANUARY 23. I9~R

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Q

JOHNSON SENDS SECRET MESSAGE:

One Yeain111I~PrIl

WITH THE ORIGINAL NON-PROFIT TIONA STUDENT PROGRAMS TO ISRAEL
SUMMER IN KIBBUTZ 20th annual ISRAEL
CO-ED 18.25 SUMMER INSTITUTE
10 WEEK rCA-Es5-8
Jr. Div. Ages 151/-18
WORK PROGRAM Sr. Div. Ages 18-25
wimm r 7 / WEEKS-July-August
7 g and 3 WEEKS intensive tourin
working in the pioneer in 2 WEEKS working
spirit of a Kibbutz in a Kibbutz-
2WEEKS special interest
ae field trips (art, social
11%2 WEEKS-touring welfare, sciences,
2 WEEKS-free time archeology, etc.)
3 DAY European stopovef
Tot I Cost $695 (at most) Total Cost $945
For infnrmatinn cont'-t:
Come to "Israel and You" Conference
Tues., Jan. 23, 7:30 P.M., Union Ballroom

Filson, Kosygin Meet in Moscow Offered to Students

*

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ng-
:r

MOSCOW OP)-Soviet Premier
Alexei N. Kosygin received a se-
cret message from President
Johnson yesterday and shortly
afterward began a general dis-
cussion of world problems with
visiting British Prime Minister
Harold Wilson.
British sources said Wilson
was informed of Johnson's mes-
sage but they declined to relate
it directly to Wilson's visit.
U.S. Ambassador Llewellyn E.
Thompson delivered the message
to Kosygin. The American Em-
bassy and Soviet sources declined
to say what it contained.
Wilson flew in for a 51 hour
visit and immediately sat down
with Kosygin. They met first in
the Kremlin and then at an in-
formal working dinner to discuss
general world problems.
Beyond saying the atmosphere
was friendly, neither the British
nor the Russians would say what
ws s discussed.
Vietnam, Cambodia and the
Middle East were known to be on
Wilson's list, but diplomatic ob-
servers have found no sign of

change in the Soviet positions on
these topics that might mean sig-
nificant results from the talks.
In London, British Foreign Sec-
retary George Brown told angry
members of Wilson's Labor party
that private exchanges are under
way on ending the Vietnam war.
He did not elaborate.
Whiie Kosygin and Wilson
were talking in the Kremlin, Ko-
sygin's government newspaper
Izvestia appeared with a slashing
attack on British Middle East
pclicy. It followed Soviet press
attacks in the last few days on
British support for U.S. policy in
Vietnam.
The .British sources confirmed
that Thompson had delivered a
message from Johnson. The
American Embassy had said only
that Thompson requested his 30
minute Kremlin meeting with
Kosygin.
Diplomatic observers suggested
Thompson might have seen Ko-
sygin about Vietnam or about
Cambodia, and Wilson would be
discussing both subjects. Wilson
is expected to report his findings

here to Johnson during a Wash-
ington visit Feb. 8 and 9.
Britain and the Soviet Union
supplied co-chairmen for the 1954,
and 1962 Geneva conferences on
the Vietnam - Cambodia - Laos
area.
Wilson tried in vain on two
visits here in 1966 to win Soviet
agreement to reconvening a Ge-
neva meeting, but the Russians
have said they lacked authoriza-
tion to represent Hanoi in such
an action.
The Soviet Union is reported
opposed to strengthening the Ge-
neva conference's peacekeeping'
machinery for Cambodia, and
both Wilson and Johnson are in-
terested in that.

Kosygin flies Thursday to In-
dia, where Cambodian peace
keeping is expected to be dis-
cussed because India provides the
chairman for the International
Control Commission.
Wilson flew from merely chilly
London into Moscow's below zero
weather. After borrowing a So-
viet official's black karakul hat
to review a frosty honor guard at
the snowy airport, Wilson drove
into the capital with Kosygin and
promptly began Kremlin talks.
The official announcement of
the meeting said "several topical
questions were discussed in a
friendly atmosphere." British
sources termed them substantive
talks on world problems.

By AVIVA KEMPNER
An Israel-sponsored volunteer
program, "Sherut La'am," is cur-
rently offering American and
Canadian students the chance to
serve for one year in Israel aid-
ing immigrants and helping de-
velop communities.
Started in 1965, the program
has recruited over 250 college
students and professionals be-
tween the ages of 19 and 30.
The program is sort of a cross
between the Peace Corps and
VISTA. It's similar to the Peace
Corps in that students are going
to a foreign country to aid de-
velopment and modernization.
And it's similar to VISTA in that
the students work for the spon-
'ti? ::'ti{{::i

!oring country; they are not be-
ing sent abroad by Israel.
The one year Israeli program
includes three months of training
in Hebrew, geography, and his-
tory and nine months of actual
field work.
Two choices are offered to the
volunteers:
" They can help settle under-
privileged immigrants in villages.
* They can work on a kibbutz,
an Israeli communal farm-vil-
lage.
Jobs the workers will undertake
range from social work, physical
education and art teaching to
farm and factory help.
Irving Bigio, 169, taught physics
and math as a member of the
first American group to go. He

Creative Arts Festival!
TICKETS FOR THE FOLLOWING EVENTS
AVAILABLE AT THE FESTIVAL DESK
IN THE UNION THIS WEEK
Monday-Friday 9:30-4:30
Saturday & Sunday 1 :00-5:00
ART BUCKWALD:
"Son of the Great Society"
Sunday, Jan. 28-Hill Aud.
8:00 P.M.-Students $1.00
PETER ARNOTT:
puppetteer presents "Dr. Faustus"
Monday, Jan. 29
Aud. A-8:00 P.M.-50c
"SALOME" by Oscar Wilde:
Lord Chamberlain Players
Thurs., Fri., Sat., Feb. 1-3
Angell Hall Foyer-8:00 P.M.-$1.00
BOBBY HUTCH ESON TRIO:
Saturday, Feb. 3
Trueblood Aud.-8:30 P.M.-$2.00

DAILY OFFICIAL Bt
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...................

4

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(Continued from Page 5)
groups, call 764-7460 for arrangements.
Placement Interviews: Please make
appts. before 4:00 p.m. day preceding
interview.
Thurs., Jan. 25, 1968
Air Force Logistics Command,
Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio - M & F
BA Arch., Econ., Libr. Sc., Math for
Library, Person., Stat., Bus. Mgmt.,
Training Programs.
Michigan Consolidated Gas Com-
pany, Detroit, Mich, - M & F, BA
Econ., Math and Chem for EDP, Mgmt.
Trng., Controller's Office.
The Chase Manhattan Bank, N.Y.C.
- BA Econ., Engl., Gen. Lib. Arts,
Hist., Law, Math, Philo., Physics, for
Banking, Ergn. Trade, and Mgmt.
Trng. __________

YOUNG DEMOCRATS
present
ROGER CRAIG
STATE SENATOR
Topic:
"Conscience & Politics"
TONIGHT-Tuesday, January 23-8 P.M.
Multipurpose Room-UGLI

Columbia University, G r a d u a t e
School of Business, N.Y.C. - M & F.
All degrees and majors interested in
MBA and PhD. programs.
Needhamn, Harper & Steers, Chicago,
Ill. - M & F BA/MA Econ., Engl., Fine
Arts, Gen. Lib. Arts, Hist., Journ.,
Philo., for Advertising.
VISTA, Wash. D.C. - See annct.
above.
Fri., Jan. 26, 1968
Harris Trust and Savings Bank, Chi-
cago, Ill. - M & F BA/MA Econ., Gen.
Lib. Arts, and Math for Banking, EDP,
Mgmt. Trng. and Secretarial.
Procter & Gamble Distributing Com-
pany, Cincinnati, Ohio - BA Econ.,
Educ., Fine Arts, Engl.
VISTA, Wash. D.C. - See ahnect.
above.
opportunities for Further 4udy and
Financial Aid, call 764-7460 for further
information.
Mount Holyoke College, Graduate
Teaching Assstantships, half-time
study-teaching, carry 8 hrs. credit to-
ward MA or PhD. Tuition waived hti-
pe,d.
California Institute of Technology,
Pasadena, Calif. Graduate study In in-
formation Science - pre and post
doctoral program with possible major
and minor combinations between Div.
of Engrg., Applied Sci. Biol., and Phys.,
Math & Astro. Graduate study in Bio-
logical Systems Analysis, Fellowships,
etc. avail. Syllabus for each at Bur-
eau, listing complete subjects avail-
able.
Summer Placement Service, 212 S.A.B.,
Lower Leve.l,
Deadline for applications for sum-
mer employment with federal govn't is

said, "The exchange was reward-
ing. I learned a new language and
came in contact with a different
people and set of attitudes."
The Sherut La'am program
gives draft exemption to male
Feb. 1, applic. at s.P.s. students, while the shorter six-
Interviews: month Volunteers for Israel pro-
Jan. 22: gram does not
Pine River Canoe Camp, Mich. Ecys, ga osnt
Exper. counselors, men, over 20, also A program slated for tonight,
Jan. 23, 2-5 p.m. "Israel and You Conference," will
Jan. 24:exlithprga toitesd
Camp Libbey, Ohio Girl Scout Camp expin the program to interested
1-5 p.m. Unit leaders and assistantstudents.
Waterfront, Director and Alssistants. --
Business Manager, Program Consultant.Ja.2:C u tP hi ts
Jan. 25:Court i-rohibits
Camp Chi, Lake Deiton, Wis. 10 a. m.
5 p.m. Counselors and unit leaders,
exper. in soc. work training is required. ( hlJn 2:Bi
Davey Tree Expert Company, Kent,
Ohio. 10 a.m. -5 p.m. Forestry, tree sur-
gery and some an .iscape work. LANSING (;) - The Lansing
Jan. 29: Board of Education has been per-
Camp Al-Gon-(ruin, Mich. coed. aety naidfrmbsg
camp. Takona, Mich. girls and Campmantyejidfrm bsg
Birkett, Day Camp, YM-YWCA of Ann Negro or white pupils from one
Arbor. All three camps interview Jan. high school to another in a move
29, 10-5. Counselors for all fields. Start- create racial balance.
ing age for Couns. Trainees is 17.
Jan. 31: The. ruling came from a three
Camp Tanuga, Mich. Coed. Cabin judge panel of circuit judges,
Counselor. Riding Master and Cook, which held that the board's order
10-5 hours interviewing.
Jan. 30, 1968: specifying that Negroes be bused
Corn Products Corporation from one school to two others
General Dynamics Corp. -- Liquid would be "discrimination in re-
Carbonic Division. ere
General Electric Company verse."
General Motors Corporation Judge Sam Street. Hughes,
Howard, Needles, Tmmen &ispeaking for the court, said such
Bergen ra move would be "discrimination
The Mitre Corporation for instead of discrimination
Owens-Corning Fiberglas Corp. against" Negroes.
The Procter & Gamble Co. The circuit jurists held, how-AI
The Sherwin-Williams Company evrththebadmyc ng
U.S. Naval Ship Research and Devel- ever, that the board may change
opment Center school district boundaries.

OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

CHRISTIAN INFORMATION
SERVICE
P.O. Box 1048, Rochester, N.Y. 14603

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Start

Thinking

About

SUBLETTING

YOUR

APARTMENT

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THE URBAN FORUM 11

A series of four lectures on the subject of urban and
regional planning will be given at the University of
Michigan beginning January 29, 1968. Each lecture will
be held in Auditorium B, Angell Hall, at 4:00 P.M.
The lectures are FREE and open to the public
THE PLANNING PROFESSION:
ITS POSITION AND PROSPECTS
WILLIAM EWALD, AlP, City Planning Consultant,
Consultant to the AIP Project on the Next Fifty Years
JANUARY 29
EFFECTIVENESS OF THE PLANNER
IN THE POLITICAL SYSTEM
ALVAN ALTSCHULER, Associate Professor of Political Science,
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
FEBRUARY 12
A PHILOSOPHY FOR
REGIONAL PLANNING EDUCATION
HARVEY PERLOFF, Director, Program of Regional Studies,
Resources for the Future, Inc.
FEBRUARY 26
NEW PATTERNS FOR RELATIONSHIPS
BETWEEN URBAN PLANNING
AND URBAN MANAGEMENT
NATHAN GRUNDSTEIN, Director, Graduate Program in
Public Management Science, Western Reserve University
MARCH 11
The lecture series is made possible in part by an Education Grant from
the U.S. Office of Education. The series is sponsored by the City
Planning Program at the University of Michigan, the Department of
Architecture, the Institute of Public Administration, the School of
Natural Resources, the Law School, and the Department of Environ-
mental Health in the School of Public Health.
Additional information can be obtained by
calling 764-1298 or 763-3184

4

vi

*1

i 1

Ui

for

the

Summer

THE UNIVERSITY
OF ROCHESTER
ROCHESTER, NEW YORK 14620
A representative
will be on this campus

Advertise in

FEBRUARY 2, 1968
to interview prospective graduates interested
in career opportunities on the University staff
in a wide variety of fields including:

4

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5i

Dait

accounting
biology and chemistry
research
business administration
clinical lab. technology
dietetics
early childhood education

nursing
occupational therapy
personnel
pharmacy
physical therapy
physics research
radiation biology
radiology

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