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January 05, 1968 - Image 11

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-01-05

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:Y

5kr igan

Daty

Seventy-Seven Years of Editorial Freedom

VOL. LXXVIII, No. 82

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, JANUARY 5, 1968

SPORTS SECTION

Cagers Lose,

Win, Lose,

Win,

Win, Lose

Icemen Prepare for Spartans;

Cougars Roll;
Hayes Nets 31,
Special To The Daily
HOUSTON-After climbing to
a respectable 4-4 record on the
strength of two home court vic-
tories over Butler and Northern
Illinois, Michigan journeyed to
Houston last Tuesday night only
to be clobbered by the second-
r ked Cougars 91-65.
Houston, which was upset by
an upstart Michigan team 86-75
in Ann Arbor last year, waltzed
to its 14th straight victory of the
season before a standing room
only crowd. The Cougars, who
host top-ranked UCLA in the
strodome in two weeks, won its
47th consecutive contest at home.
The Cougars, who couldn't buy
a basket against the Wolverines
a year ago, connected on 40 of 76
shots from the floor this time
around. Elvin Hayes, who was
called for six goal tending viola-
'ons in the Michigan upset last!
ear, tossed in 31 points in thel
return match. The "Big" hit on!
15 of 22 shots from' the floor
in guiding Houston to an easy
victory.
Hayes, who has been called the
best senior in the country, this!
dear, was assisted in the Michi-
gan debacle by Ken Spain and
Don Chaney, who garnered 15,
and 14 points respectively.
"I sure couldn't be one to say
those kids don't deserve the rank-
ing they have," said a stunned
Vjplverine Coach Dave Strack
after the Cougars had torn his
team apart.
He had special praise for Hayes
who was ranked among both the
top scorers and rebounders in the
nation the past two seasons. "He
is absolutely tremendous," Strack
aserted. "He makes the team.
His presence on the floor is enough
to awe anyone Houston plays."
Besides being the leading scorer,
the Big E snatched 13 rebounds.
The 6'9" forward pulled down 11
of those in the second half as
Michigan fell hopelessly behind
ouston.
The Wolverines, who have had
trouble on defense and shooting

Butler, Northern Illinois Fall; Line Changes Add New Look
By DIANA ROMANCIUK the red line blue. But by
First Victims in Events BuildingISat.aisWvrnevisnghat80 w pn"

Friday
"'Signs

PRESSURE ON MICHIGAN SHOOTERS like this block by
Houston's Melvin Bell on Dennis Stewart were largely responsible
for the anemic 33 per cent Wolverine scoring average in their
91-65 loss to the Cougars Tuesday night.
all year, only were able to take 1 20 points. Michigan, which had
a brief 8-7 lead with 15 minutes been getting good scoring bal-
remaining in the first half. From ance over the winter holidays was
there it was all uphill, without it against the taller
Michigan opened the game with Cougars. Only Pitts and Dennis
a zone defense but switched to a Stewart were able to break into
man-to-man after the Cougars double figures against Houston

jumped out to a 14-10 lead. The'
Wolverines again went back to the
zone after the Cougars riddled the
man-to-man with holes, opening
up a29-21 lead. Still,Houston
surged to a 40-29 halftime lead
which was never headed.
Michigan, which must have left
its shooting eye at home, only
could hit on 25 of 75 attempts
from the floor for a horrendous
33.3 per cent average. Houston,
which was colder than Green Bay
during the NFL Championship
game against the Wolverines
last year, hit for a respectable
53 per cent.
Rudy Tomjanovich was thej
only bright spot in a lackluster'
Michigan attack. The 6'7" sopho-
more led both teams in rebounds
with 18, pzilling down five more
than Hayes.
Tomjanovich also was the
Wolverines' leading scorer with

with 12 and 11 points respectively.j
MICHIGANf

By PHIL BROWN
Michigan's cagers temporarily
squared their season record at 4-4
last week with a pair of home vic-
tories over tough small-college
teams. A 93-76 trouncing of Butler
and an 84-77 triumph at the ex-
pense of Northern Illinois gave the
Wolverines an optimistic finish
to 1967.
Butler came to Ann Arbor boast-
ing victories over two Big Ten
squads, but Michigan coach Dave
Strack was looking beyond that
point to the Bulldogs' unimpressive
3-4 record.
The Wolverines reeled off four
quick baskets to start the second
half, breaking a 45-45 intermission
deadlock and serving notice to the
visitors that Michigan hospitality
ends at courtside.
It's What's Up Front
Strack was pleased by the team's
showing against Butler, although
he did indicate that there was still
room for improvement.
"We need more strength up
front," he commented after the
game. "but we've always thought
we did."
Junior forward Bob Sullivan's
22 points led the Wolverine scor-
ing, followed closely by 21, 19, and
18-point efforts by Rudy Tom-
janovich, Dennis Stewart, and Jim
Pitts. respectively.
The Butler contest was the first
for Michigan in which three offi-
cials were used. Neither Strack nor
Bulldog mentor Tony Hinkle ex-
pressed much enthusiasm about
the system.
Getting Better
"I have to say I saw improve-
ment tonight," Strack said. "We
played very poorly against David-
son, then were much better outj
xwest tin the Sun Devil Classic)."
It was enough improvement to
give the Wolverines their first vic-
tory in the new Events building,
but the excitement was all saved
for the second win.
Northern Illinois came to town
with a player named Russell-
from Chicago's Carver High-and
an enthusiastic crowd gathered to
see Michigan dump Donnie Russell;
and his Husky teammates on af
late charge, 84-77.
The Brothers Russell
Donnie Russell's famous brother,
ex-Wolverine Cazzie, made a sur-
prise appearance at the contest, to
the delight of the partisan crowd.
I Former Wolverine assistant Tom
Jorgensen, now head coach at

Northern Ilinois, credited thej
younger Russell with playing "the
finest game of his career." The
sophomore guard tallied 17 points
and grabbed 6 rebounds in his
starting role.
"We really thought we could
win it," sighed Jorgensen. "WeI
knew a lot about Michigan, of
course. It's different from reading
a scouting report-more like know-
ing every one of the kids."
The Huskies had battled Mich-
igan on even terms throughout
most of the game, and when they
took the lead 70-69 on Aubrey
See 'HOOPSTERS,' page 5

BILL LORD

DROP TWO TO DENVER;
Icers Finish Second in Tourney

games, the Blue have won 57,
lost only 20, and tied one. But
Michigan State doesn't give up
easily.
Michigan painted everything but

c h n L -in the 3,751 capacity arena will
Though the much-traveled head be down for the first skirmish of
T this season's four meetings. Sat-
will be absent this Friday night, urday night, same time the scene
the spirited rivalry that always moves to East Lansing, giving
accompanied a Michigan-Michi- each team a chance at home-
gan State clash will be here. The town-crowd advantage.
name of the game this weekend is Last year in regular season
not football but hockey. WCHA action, the same setup
The Wolverines have maintain- resulted in alternate wins and de-
ed the winning edge in this series feats for the two teams. However,
- a series exceeded only by that the final meeting of the two, in
with Michigan Tech. In the 78 ;h n f Arl 1
th~c WCH l ff'~J..O hl di lA~G

By DAVE WEIR
M i c h i g a n' s hockey players
brought back a variety of trophies
from the holiday schedule of four
games.
For instance, sophomore Don
Deeks came back with a broken
nose suffered in- a 'victory over
Wisconsin. Observers of recent
Wolverine practice sessions know
that Deeks also has a masked
partner on skates in the person of
senior forward Bruce Koviak.
Koviak has now decided to shed
his protective mask, but he is

still feeling the effects of a broken title game on the strength of
checkbone. goalie Jim Keough's 8-0 white-

Rookie scoring flash (he's got
nine) Dave Perrin received sev-
eral presents over the holidays,
including a touch of the flu and
a pair of rainchecks for this
weekend's double faceoff with
Michigan State.
Perrin failed to light up the red
light in the three games he played,
but he did run up the thermome-
ter in health service to 102 de-
grees during the game he missed.
Second Place
As a group. the players fared
somewhat better, copping second
place in the first annual Big Ten
Hockey Tournament at Minnea-

i
i
i
I
i
i
f
1

wash of Wisconsin on the night
before in the semi finals.
Keough was named the Most
Valuable Player of the classic for
his performance, while Wolverine
stars Bill Lord and Lee Marttila
were voted to the all-tourney
team.
Minnesota jumped off to a quick
lead in the championship match
by scoring two first period goals
against the usually-impenetrable
Keough.

Sullivan
Pits
Stewart
Tomianovich
Maxey
Maundrell
Edwards
McClellan
Frauman
Henry
'totals

I

ue wun Payo rs, o 01s a1
memories of a 4-2 loss for Mich-
igan. This year, though both
teams were entered in the Big
Ten Hockey Tournament over the
holidays, they did not meet.
While Michigan was compiling a
1-1 record good for a second place
finish, MSU won two and lost one
to place third. After blanking Ohio
State 7-0 in the first round, the
Spartans lost to Minnesota 6-3,
meeting and defeating Wisconsin
4-3 in the consolation finals. The
tournament did provide an op-
portunity for the coaches to scout
the opposition.
Michigan coach Al Renfrew de-
scribes the Spartans as "tough,
good, and fast. They skate all the

G
3-1
2-10
4-18
9-20
4-I
1-2
1-2
1-4
0-0)
2-5
:25-75

FT
1-1
8-11
3-5
2-4
0-1
0-1
0-0
1-1
0-0
0-0
15-24

H1ayes 15
Lee 3
Spain7
Chaney 5
Reynolds 1
Lewis
Gribben
Hamood F
Bell3
Bane1
Cooper]
Totals 40
HOUSTON
MICIGAN
Attendance: 5400

USTON
G FT
-22 1-3
-11 2-4
-12 1-4
-15 4-5
1-2 0-0
2-4 1-1
3-5 2-3
2-3 0-0
1-1 0-0
0-0 0-0
1-1 0-0
-76 11-20

It
3
6
7
18
4
0
1
5
0
46
13
8
9
8
6
0
3
S0
0
48
40
29

1}
1
3
5
3
1
0
0
0
2
15

T
3
20
8
2
3
4
4
65

polis.
The

undefeated

Gophers ofI

NOTICE
It might be wel if those of
you who want to but haven't
yet joined The Daily sports
staff to do so as soon as pos-
cihl_

P 1'
4 31
2 8
3 15
3 14
1 2
0 5
3 8
1 4
1 2
0) 0
0 2
18 91
51-91
36-65

IN OUTSIDE ACTION:
SBig Ten Cagers Victimized

Minnesota slipped past the Wol-
verines 3-1 in the championship
match on the next-to-last day
of the year to clinch the tourney
crown.
Michigan had advanced to the
, eond IBest
FIRST PERIOD SCORING M-
4arttila (Hansen, Gross) 2:31; Gal-
braith (Marttila) 12:33 Marttila
(Galbraith, Hansen) 17:58. PEN-
ALTIES M-Lord (interferen'e)
32:58: Pashak (high sticking) 6:45;
Hartman (roughing) 8:11; Lord
(hooking) 9:19, Domm (slashing)
9:19; Hansen (slashing) 15:43. -
SSmith (hooking) 3:08; Lenartson
(slashig) 9:19.
SECOND PERIOD SCORING: M-
Galbrait~h (Marttila) 5:46; Marttila
(a=braith, Ullyot) 15:44. PENAL-
TIES: il-,Lord (elbowing) 2:48;
Glendinning (slashing) 8:41; Gal-
braith (tripping) 17:14.
THIRD PERIOD SCORING: M-
Pashak (Glendinning, Hartman)
3:51; Marttila (Gross) 8:57; Binnie
(Lord) 11:19. PENALTIES: Al-
1)0mi (high sticking) 18:45. WV-
Vroman (tripping) Obrodovich
served 4:31; Fitzgerald (holding)
14:51; Smith (high sticking) 18:45.
SAVES
Vroman (V) 19 20 22-52
Keough (M) 19 15 9--43

F

I - - - W yr w

Score By Periods

See MSU', Page 2

ichigran
Wiscon sin

3 2 3-8
0 0 0-0

FIRST PERIOD SCORING: Minn
-Shattuck (Dufour, Fichuk) 7:14;
Fichuk (unassisted) 15:31. PENAL-
TIES: Mich--Domm (holding)
15:44; Domm (holding) 18:50. Minn
-Klatt (hooking) 16:25; Gambucci
(roughling) 18:50.
SECOND PERIOD SCORING: Mich
-linnie (Hlartmnan) 12:25. PENAL-
TIES: Mch-Hansen (slashing)
3:01; Perrin (tripping) 15:03. Minn-
Shattuck (holding) 3:01.
THIRD PERIOD SCORING: Minn
--Paradise (Klatt) 1:22. PENALTIES:
Mich-Glendinning (hooking) 13:18;
Galbraith (cross checking) 17:17.
inn--Gambucei (high stickinr)
17:48.

Juggle Works sideI
Between periods in the locker time." MSU who finished fifth in
room, Wolverine coach Al Ren- the WC U las sed butthi
frew decided to "juggle the lines the WCHA last season but third
around in order to get some scor- in the NCAA finals, lost 10 seniors
ing punch into the lineup." This to graduation.
decision resulted in a spectacular "A lot of people will overlook
second period marker by junior us," muses Amo Bessone, MSU's
Randy Binnie. ice mentor, "but we'll have a few
The goal came on a two-on-one
breakaway with teammate Jerry surprises." One of those surprises
See 'KEOUGH,' page 2 could be very well be goalie Rich-
ard Duffett. A sophomore, Duffett
lint W Wst becomes eligible on Friday night

By PAT ATKINS Big Ten's comparatively poor rec-
One of the worst holiday slaugh- ord in outside play did not alterj
ters took place not on the nation's the prospect of a wide open con-
highways, but on the basketball!ference race.:
courts where Big Ten teams "I think you'll find the caliber
played. of competition, particularly in
Tourney toll was one of the tournaments, was unusually strong
heaviest on record for Big Ten this season," said Glass. "But, theI
teamsas they struggled to an Big Ten--because it is a tought
8-17 holiday tournament record. conference-had a tendency to do!
Against outside competition they more experimenting than other
have won 48 and lost 41 for a .539 people."
Oercentage. Indiana and Michigan Statec
The conference still has 10 non- shared the title last season, each
loop games remaining after Satur- at 10-4, but both are tabbed to1
day's five-contest opening round meet challenges this winter from
of league play to better the lowest at least a half dozen other con-
n pmk n-ue tenders.

State at 6-2, who base their hopes
on Bill Hosket, followed by Wis-
consin and Indiana at 6-3. Mich-
igan and Illinois hold identical
4-5 records, with Minnesota turn-
ing in the weakest performance at
3-7.
Battered by one of their worst
tuneup campaigns, Big Ten bas-
ketball forces plunge Saturday
from the frying pan into the fire
of what looms as a wild, free-for-
all championship campaign with
opening conference games of Pur-
due at Ohio State, Minnesota at
Indiana, Michigan at Wisconsin,
and Iowa at Northwestern.

This Weekend in Sports
FRIDAY
WRESTLING-Illinois at Events Building, 3:00 p.m.
HOCKEY-Michigan State at Coliseum, 8:00 p.m.
SATURDAY
WRESTLING-Indiana at Events Building, 2:00 p.m.
BASKETBALL-Michigan at Wisconsin
SWIMMING-Big Ten Relays at Bloomington
GYMNASTICS-Michigan at Eastern Michigan
HOCKEY-Michigan at Michigan State

McLachla
Keough
Michigan
minneSoto

SAVES
n (Minn) 7 9 6-22
(Mich) 6 13 11-30
Score By Periods

BRUCE KOVIAK

CHRISTIAN INFORMATION
SERVICE
P. O. Box 1048, Rochester, N. Y. 14603

a

0 1 0-1
2 0 1-3

--- _ ... _ _. _ _ . _. -----___._ ._._.__ Y _. . _..___--_ ._ _..._..._._. .

OUTsla eMaR aguiiaiu-uu
play in a decade, 52-44 for .542 in
the 1960-1961 campaign. ' 1
UCLA and Houston, the nation's c
one-two poll leaders, have been I
especially hard on Big Ten teams 1
with five victories between them.'t
Among other outside teams which ,
measured Big Ten clubs were Van-
derbilt, Kentucky and Tennessee,
urth, fifth and sixth, respectively
Inthe national poll.
Coach Bill Glass of Northwest-
ern, who started 10 different play-{
ers in nine tuneup games, said the j

Said contenders include Rick
Mount-paced Purdue, Iowa, Wis-
consin, Ohio State, Northwestern
and perhaps surprising Illinois.
Michigan and Minnesota may even
cause trouble before the season
ends March 5.
Purdue battled UCLA down to I
the wire in their opener before
losing 73-71. But they also lost
76-59 to Butler, a team that
Michigan beat handily 93 to 76.
The best average against out-
side competition belongs to Ohio

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