100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 19, 1968 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-01-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PANE SEA'

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 1969

PAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY. JANUARY 19. 1968

... _... ,....ter, v .. vy +v vu

u

NOON-DINNER FORUM-
Sunday, January 21
"Vietnam, A Conflict of Values"
MRS. LE THI 'ANH
Vietnamese writer and philosopher
Dinner-75c
Reservations-662-3580 or 665-6575
at the PRESBYTERIAN CAMPUS CENTER
1432 Washtenaw
SABBATH SERVICE.
Tonight at 7:15
Torah Service and Oneg Shobbot
Choir directed by Steven Ovitsky
with Joan Spitzer, Organist

Regents Hold Hours Discussion STIFF WARNING:
(continued from Page 1) with an advisor in the OSA and one in, but how do you feel aboutB r sC orrespond ents
issues which get at the economic that they "get along very well." hours?" Fleming asked.
guts of the University and which He said "SC has probably "You know how I feel about
are handled in secrecy." played more games than anyone hours. When do we get to talk 1
"Do you have any more com- else" this year. about research? The only reason I i ..- -JLRD--~1- -. in R Reb i u In elle tuals

ments on the issues at hand?
Fleming asked .
"Yes," Kahn answered. "The
Regents must realize that the di-
rection of the University should
be more than a product of the
administration - the students
should be included."
Getzan was the next speaker,
and, after noting that IFC "has
been a semi-active group on the
issue of women's hours," accused
The Daily of dividing the issue
into two camps - "with SGC on
one side and the Office of Stu-
dent Affairs on the other," and
said that he was speaking on be-
half "of a third group."
Getzan described the problem
as "one of academic concern, not
political," and said that IFC
makes its rules in conjunction

"I don' twant to interfere with
your comments on SGC and The
Daily, but can you get to the
point?" Fleming asked.
Chester opened his speech by
questioning the "secrecy" and
"hypocrisy" at the University.
"If you want to talk about se-
crecy - talk about it in relation
to visitation and hours," Fleming
instructed.
"The rules on hours and visita-
tion are good examples of secrecy
and hypocrisy. There has been a
hypocritical attitude about those
rules in the dorms for a long time
-if a woman isn't going to make
curfew she just stays out all
night. There's hypocrisy in the
dorms and hypocrisy on classified
research . . ." Chester continued.
"Well, you managed to slip that

this meeting was held was be-
cause there was a lot of pressure
to have a public meeting,"
Chester claimed.
"You are wrong, wrong, wrong,"
Regent Smith responded.
"Then why did you hold this
meeting?" Chester asked. "Can
you tell me why?"
"I don't have to tell you any-
thing, but you are wrong," Smith
answered.
SGC member Sharon Lowen,
'71, explained to the Regents why
freshman women's hours were
unwanted and unnecessary. "If
we weren't at the University we
would only have city and state
laws to abide by, not rules gov-
erning our personal lives." The
rules are ineffective, she ex-
plained, because women stay out
all night if they can't be in the
dorm by the curfew.
"Where do they go when they
stay out all night?" asked Regent
William Cudlip.
"Despite what the fraternities
say about visitation rules, I don't
think they consider it a violation
unless the woman actually moves
in. I know women stay there -
it's kind of fun to stay in a fra-
ternity for a couple of weekends,
then you get tired of it - or they
stay at their girlfriend's or boy-
friend's houses," Miss Lowen said.

MOSCOW (A) - The Soviet
government tried yesterday to
choke off news from rebellious
intellectuals by warning foreign!
correspondents not to contact
them.
The stiff warning of penalties
for any contact with private So-
viet citizens came on the eve of
a news conference scheduled by
relatives of two young rebels sen-
tenced to prison last week.
Apparently hearing of the news

conference, planned for a private
apartment, Soviet officials tele-
phoned Western correspondents
and warned them not to attend.
The conference was planned by
the mother of Alexander Gins-
burg, whose son was sentenced to
five years, and the wife of Yuri
Galanskov, whose husband was
sentenced to seven years at hard
labor.
The women were expected to
reveal details of the trial, which

Marcus Pleads Innocent

1429 Hill Street

All Welcome

I I_
ONWM

GO GO
,BAHAMAS
STU DENTOU RS
SPRING BREAK SMASH!
Feb. 28-March 3
$155
Call:
John Gunning-761-8867
Claire Cantow-764-1943
Dick Rini-764-5689
Robbie Cantow-764-4253

11

ANN ARBOR VOTER REGISTRATION

To N.Y.,
NEW YORK {P)-The
the wake of a federal i
just one month ago
James L. Marcus yes
peddling his influence
City Hall aide in ano
for a $10,000 bribe.
The payment, Dist. A
S. Hogan said, was p
kickback arrangement t
firm's contracts from
water department, w
Marcus' public preserve
was a right-hand man to
can Mayor John V. Lind

OPEN NOW
UNTIL THIS FRIDAY, 8 P.M., again
FEB. 20, 2nd floor CITY HALL
(Huron at Fifth)
IF YOU ARE:
1) 21
2) More Than 50% Self-sufficient
3) In Ann Arbor Summers
YOU MAY QUALIFY
Sponsored by:
VOTER REGISTRATION OF S.G.C.
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
YOUNG DEMOCRATS

.Bribe Charges
e state, in But apparently, authorities said,
ndictment the bribe was paid in vain and
, accused the firm never got the contracts
terday of it coveted.
as a top Arrested with Marcus in the
ther case widening water department scan-
dal, the first of any consequence
tty. Frank in the Lindsay administration,
art of a was attorney Herbert Itkin, 41,
o insureia reportedly marked for murderas
the itya defendant and witness in the
hich was federal kickback case.
when he . Marcus, Itkin, racketeer Anto-
o Republi- nio "Tony Ducks" Corallo and
soy. three other men were indicted
Dec: 18 on federal charges of ar-
ranging a $40,00 kickback on an
$800,000 water department con-
tract for the cleaning of a Bronx
reservoir.

Soviet police agents had ket
closed to foreign correspondents.
Despite this, considerable news
of the trial on charges of anti-
Soviet activity reached correspon-
dents from relatives and friends
of the four defendants. One of
the four cooperated with police
and got two years; the other was
sentenced to a year but was re-
leased because of time served
awaiting trial.
Increased Daring
In recent weeks, private con-
tacts of correspondents here, plus
information reaching the West
through other means, have given
a picture of increasingly daring
defiance of Soviet police state
controls by young intellectuals.
The warning was telephoned to
The Associated Press by Leonid
M. Zamyatin, head of the Soviet
Foreign Ministry's press depart-
ment, which accredits foreign
correspondents here. Other de-
partment officials telephoned
other correspondents.
Regulations
"I would like to remind you,"
Zamyatin told Henry S. Bradsh-
er, AP Bureau Chief, "that regu-
lations in the Soviet Union re-
quire that all contacts of foreign
correspondents with private per-
sons should be arranged through
the press department. We would
take serious measures against"
any correspondent who flouts the
rule.

'A

LSD Blindness Called Hoax;
Commission Head Fired

f

IL

WITHI SPEIAL IGUEST STARSK

HARRISBURG, Pa. (A')-Penn-
sylvania Gov. Raymond P. Shafer
branded yesterday as a hoax, and
completely false, the strange story
of six Pennsylvania college stu-
dents blinded 20 months ago
while staring at the sun under
the influence of the drug LSD.
It Just never happened, Shafer
told a hastily sumomned news,
conference. He immediately sus-
pended the man who first said
it did.
The governor said the case,
clouded since disclosure a week
ago in the kind of psychedelic
trance LSD reportedly induces,
was an invention of Dr. Norman
Yoder, 53, Pennsylvania's com-
missioner for the blind since 1959.
Yoder, blind for 45 years from
a blow from a baseball bat, was
described as "distraught and sick"
by Shafer-and he asked to be
allowed to enter a hospital for
immediate treatment.
Shafer flew back from a brief
winter vacation Tuesday and said

Wednesday the LSD blindness
story was true. But' he ordered a
full state Justice Department in-
vestigation on why the case was
secret since April, 196, when it
allegedly occurred near the cam-
pus of a small western Pennsyl-
vania college.
Yoder refused to identify the u
college or name the students, but
said all had resumed academic
studies at different schools. He
said the six were receiving state
rehabilitative aid and, under the
law, their identies couldn't be dis-
closed.
Members of the Shafer admin-
istration again and again con-
firmed the incident did occur and
supported Yoder's secrecy.
Welfare Secretary Dr. Thomas
W. Georges, Yoder's boss, said
Yoder-pressed to have some sort
of records ready-apparently took
reports of six legitimate blind stu-
dent cases and doctored them to
fit the facts of his fabricated LSD
incident.

GRADUATING ELECTRONIC ENGINEERS
BUILD YOUR CAREER IN FLORIDA
WITH
ELECTRONIC COMMUNICATIONS, INC.

FRIDAY, JANUARY 26
8:30 P.M.
COBO ARENA-DETRO IT
Tickets: $5.75, $4.75, $3.75, $2.75-at Cobo Arena,
J. L. Hudson's (Downtown, Northland, Eastland, Westland)
and all Grinnell stores. Mail Orders: Send checks payable
to "Bill Cosby Show" to Cobo Arena, 1 Washington Blvd.,
Detroit, Mich. 48226, together with stamped, self-addressed
return envelope.
A SAH ENTERPRISES, INC. PRODUCTION

ECI's ST. PETERSBURG DIVISION

What
the interviewers
won't tell you
about
General Electric.

I

-ON CAMPUS INTER VIEW JANUARY 25

This may be the chance you have
been waiting for - an exceptional
professional opportunity with an in-
dustry pace-setter on Florida's sub-
tropical Gulf Coast in St. Petersburg.
For qualified graduates in elec-
tronic engineering, ECI offers excel-
lent career opportunities in such areas
of advanced development and design
as coding, modulation, digital com-
munications, microelectronics, RF com-
munications technology and satellite
systems.
ECI is a recognized leader in com-
mand and control systems, minia-
turized transmitters and receivers,
multiplex systems and space instru-

mentation. With 2000 employees, ECI
is large enough to offer the facilities,
programs and security you are seek-
ing, but small enough to stress indi-
vidual achievement and to give you
every opportunity to realize your
capabilities to the fullest.
As a member of ECI's professional
team, you will be encouraged to con-
tinue your education with postgradu-
ate study. ECI offers a full tuition re-
fund.
Visit the placement office today
and make an appointment to talk
with Electronic Communications, Inc.
on Thursday, January 25th.

I

So that we can get to know more about one another, we
have arranged an informal buffet for interested electronic engi-
neering students and their ladies at the Ambassador Restaurant,
Statler Hilton Inn, beginning at 6:30 p.m., Wednesday evening,
^ 1 L n - - - - 1 - * - - _- - . L - -- _ _ . .._ 11 .,

I; I

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan