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January 18, 1968 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-01-18

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TH1TIRSDlAV.IANTT1ARV 1A_ 1091t

_.- S. tfi fSI t 1 1 7s 1!i

a

OPENINGS FOR MALE
CHILD CARE WORKERS
-HAWTHORN CENTER
Work-Experience Opportunity with Emotionally
Disturbed Children.
Hawthorn Center offers mature students a unique
opportunity to work directly with disturbed children
in a creative, well-supervised, in-patient treatment
setting - a particularly rewarding experience for
potential professional workers in Education, Psy-
chology, Social Work, Medicine / and related Be-
havioral Sciences.
Hours: 32 or 40 hours per week. Must be able to
work days and weekends.
Age Requirement:-Minimum--20 years.
Education: Minimum-Two credit years completed
and good academic standing in third year.
Salary: With Bachelor's degree-$6200-$6500
per year.
Without Bachelor's degree-$5600-$6350
per year.

Sophomore Kinkead Adds Spark to

Call or Write:

Director of Nursing
Hawthorn Center
Northville, Michigan
Telephone: Area Code 313-
Fl 9-3000 8 A.M. to 4:30 P.M.

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By CINDY LEATHERMAN
The accolades of a high school
career are the usual credentials
any hopeful carries with him when
entering Michigan on athletic
scholarship-especially a full paid
one.
Not so for Gary Kinkead. He
never even participated in highI
school competition, simply be-
cause there was no pool at Hun-
tington High.
"This is typical of Indiana-
they don't have any pools inctheir
high schools," commented coach
Gus Stager.
Jim Pitts has been named
captain of the Michigan bas-
ketball team for the remainder
of the season. The 6'3" senior,
who has alternatedabetween
guard and forward, has aver-
aged 16.2 points in 11 games
this season.
Michigan basketball coach
Dave Strack, who named Pitts
captain, said "Pitts was the
logical choice. He's the only
senior starting and he has done
a good job for us all year."
In fact, the only pool in the en-
tire city was at the local YMCA
where Kinkead tried out for the
team. In order to qualify he ex-
plains, "I had to swim the length
of the fifty meter pool. It took me
three times before I made it." That
was when he was eight.
At the age of ten, eleven, and
tweleve, he was the national but-
terfly champ. "The funny thing
is," Kinkead observed, "When I
first started, I was afraid the other
swimmers would splash me-I was
afraid to get wet."
Kinkead has been getting wet
for the past eleven years. A sopho-
WhA's it ilc
to work
for a iant?
Depends on the giant. If the
giant happens to be Ford Motor
Company, it can be a distinct
advantage. See your placement
director and make an appoint-
ment to see the man from Ford
when he is here on:
FEBRUARY 5, 6

more he, specializes in the dist-
ance freestyle and the individual
medley. Although lacking in high
school experience, Kinkead gained
valuable swimming knowledge as
a member of the Huntington team.
"I attribute my being here to my
YMCA coach, Glen Hummer. I'd
been in a slump and he helped me
gain back what I'd lost-confi-
dence." Hummer, incidentally, also
coached Gary Dilley, who placed
second in the 200-meter backstroke
in the 1964 Olympics.
Kinkead was offered scholar-
ships from Michigan State and
Purdue as well as Michigan. "I
definitely wanted to swim in the
Big Ten," he points out. "And the
last year I swam in the nationals
they were held in Kalamazoo.
Kimball was there and saw me
sw~im."
And the Wolverine diving coach
obviously liked what he saw. "But
I'd never seen or even talked to:
Gus Stager before I came here as
a freshman," Kinkead explains.
"Michigan just doesn't have the
recruiting program that Indiana
does, and maybe that's the differ-
ence between the two teams. Their
coach has gotten swimmers from
six different countries. He recruits
them all over the place. He talks
to boys, writes to them, does a lot
of things that aren't done at,
Michigan."

won that; ten minutes later, I
s ~*-came back and won the 200 meter'
backstroke. Both races were my
best up to that time. I guess that
w,.as my greatest thrill."
GARY KINKEAD And with regard to his greatest
disappointment, Kinkead quipped,
ing of any sport. If I didn't enjoy "I've had so many-you wouldn't
it, I'd get out." believe it." One would have to be
He isn't going to make swim- Saturday's Indiana meet, during
rming his life, however. He's pres- which "I wasn't at my best. But
ently in education, but has "no I've looked for a weakness in their
idea" as to what he will teach. team, and just can't find one,"
How about coaching? "Good pos- Kinkead added.

team cooperation. "Everybody
gets along real well." observesj
Kinkead. "In contrast, the diving
and the swimming team it In-
diana are completely separate.
They work out at different times,
and even the coaches are separate.
The Indiana coach was really sur-
prised when he heard that Dick!
Kimball and Stager often work
together with their teams-that
in itself shows a more closely

Coach Stager is pleased with Kin-
kead. "I think he's a very fine
young man. When he first came
here, he was not quite mature as
a college student, but certainly
mature as a swimmer. He had
racing ability, but I don't think
he really knew why he was in col-
lege."
Kinkead has certainly found a
direction in the water. Last Sat-
urday, he came in second to

sibility."
Kinkead is a very easy-going
guy. In fact, says Stager, "If
there's anything wrong with Gary,
it's that he's too nice a guy. A lot
of coaches like to see a streak of

Speaking of Indiana ,the Kin-
kead family is personal friends
with Jim Councilman, the Hoosier
coach. Why didn't he go to In-
diana? Says Kinkead, "He never
even talked to me about coming
to school. I think it was person-
ality conflict-w'e'd know each
ither too long."
Kinkead is happy here, and

ankers
acing k'lowledge. It takes a lot
Sf cou age and racing know-how
to pull out ahead of a great swim-
mer like Windle. Gary realized it
was better to jump on Windle than
Io, Windle to jump on him. But
Gaiy let him catch up. Once you
make the move, you must have
the courage to keep up the lead."
Stager then reviewed Kinkead's
0 ympic prospects. "I think it's
crucial what he does this year.
Right now, I don't think he's up to
it--he hasn't been swimming that
long in college competition."
Kinkead's philosophy? "When I
get tired, I'm going to quit."
Stager probably hopes he'll stay
awake for at least another three
years.

Kinkead spends at least two meanness in their athletes-I
hours every day at the pool. But think it can be an asset some-
he obviously doesn't mind the ef- times."
fort. "It's the most time-consum- This friendliness is reflected in

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. A )
-The sucker shift, clipping along
the line of scrimmage, and faked
fair catches were outlawed in col-
lege football yesterday by the
rules committee of the National
Collegiate Athletic Association.
The committee also yielded to
a strong demand from college
coaches and abolished a one-
year-old rule allowing only ends
and backs to go downfield under
punts with the snap of the ball.
Committee chairman Ivan B.
Williamson, athletic director of
the University of Wisconsin, said
the new regulations "will make
football a safer game."
Line Fixed
The sucker shift was eliminated
by prohibiting interior linemen
from moving once they assumed
a position in the line. Under the

Init team." Windle in the 500 meter by only
What about Gary's greatest ath- rne-tenth of a second.
letic thrill? "In eleven years, that:s Commenting on the performance,
hard to say. My senior year in-high Stager said, "He swam a good
school at the YMCA nationals at 1000. It wasn't a spectacular race
Kalamazoo, I swam the 1650 and -I would've liked to have seen1

more of the 'college try.' The 500
Gary swam indicates he has good

'68 Rule Changes Adopted;
Disputed Punt Statute Out

Under the new rule on punt
coverage, all players on the kick-
ing team are free to go downfield
when the ball is snapped.
College football coaches had
protested bitterly against the
rule used last season for fear that
it would result in a rash of in-
juries among the ends and backs.
This didn't happen. Williamson 4
said the committee returned to
the 1966 rules because so many
of the coaches want it.
The committee also shortened
the time-out peridd from two
minutes to 1%/2 minutes and re-
quired that the clock be stopped
whenever a team makes a first don
Linemen Labeled
The committee wiped out the
tackle eligible pass play with a

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Houston Readies for Alcindor

HOUSTON, Tex. (Y)-The eye
injury suffered by Lew Alcindor
has not changed any of the stra-
tegy Guy Lewis is developing for
his Houston Cougars to use
a g a i n s t UCLA in basketball's
showdown Saturday night before
an Astrodome crowd of 55,000.

"All I feel like saying is GuyI
Lewis' intuition says Alcindor will#
play," Lewis, coach of the second
ranked Cougars, said Wednesday.
"We're going ahead preparing;
for them with the idea Alcindor
will play. We'll work against the
press a little more than we usually

ART PRINT LOAN
OPEN
JAN. 15-19, M-F, 7-9 P.M.
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do but that's about the only thing
we've changed in our routine."
Alcindor was injured last week
and is hospitalized in Los Angeles.
He is to miss the game Thursday
night when the top ranked Uclans
meet Portland.
Workmen were busy Wednesday
at the Astrodome installing the
floor borrowed from the Los An-
geles Sports Arena for the first
basektball game to be played in
the domed structure.
Houston is scheduled to hold its
first workout in the dome Thurs-
day night. UCLA is to work out
after a late afternoon arrival Fri-
day.
During Houston practice ses-
sions, Mars Evans, a 6-foot-11
redshirt sophomore, has played
the role of Alcindor.
"To beat UCLA we'll have to
shoot well and reduce the number
of our turnovers," Lewis said. "I
don't mean completely eliminate
them. We'll lose the ball some
to their press and I think they'll
lose it some to ours.
UCLA defeated Houston, 73-58,
last March in the NCAA semi-
finals at Louisville.

In the past, clipping has been
legal in a zone along the line of
scrimmage. Many flankers took
advantage of this rule by starting
wide, then cutting back into the
neutral zone to clip a linebacker.
Under the new rule no player
five yards or more outside this
zone may enter it at the snap of
the ball.'
Fakes Out
The new rule on fair catches
prohibits the man who signals
from throwing a block while the
ball is in play.
Williamson said the fake fair
catch signal was being used more
and more often so that the sig-
naler could block enemy players
coming down field. He said this
was considered unfair because
the signaler cannot be touched
by players on the other sid3 and.
$ injuries were resulting.

wear intg hesenumers win oe
eligible for a forward pass.
Some coaches have been put-
ting illegal receivers downfield by
putting numbers in the 80s , on
the tackle. These numbers usual-
ly are reserved for ends.

old rule, the linemen frequently more strict rule on numbering of
shifted for the purpose of draw- players. Centers, guards and
ing the opposition players off- tackles must be numbered be-
sides. tween 50 and 79 and no player
x~rnrin thra nimhrc ill ho

*4

Players now will be allowed to
communicate with any number of
coaches on the sideline during a
charged time-out. Last year play-
ers were permitted to talk with
only one coach.
The committee rewrote another
rule to provide that when a play-
er intercepting a pass is carried
inio the end zone by his momen-
tum, no safety will be allowed.
The ball will be put into play at
the spot where the interception
was made. But the player will be
al'owed to run the ball out of
the end zone if he chooses

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FAST READINGIS NOT DIFFICULT TO LEARN

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A / =A * Us I~U 'uen i'ur AA 44E g

The Daily Official Bulletin isan
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be,
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
lore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only,
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication. For more
Information call 764-9270.
THURSDAY, JANUARY 18

Day Calendar
Bureau of Industrial Relations Semi-
nar-"Management of Managers No.
47": North Campus Commons, 8:15
a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and 7:00 to 9:00 p.m.
Writer-in-Residence - Irving Howe,
"Anarchy and Authority In American
Literature," Angell Hall, Aud. A, 4:10
Mental Health Research Institute
Seminar-Leonard Duhl, Department
of Housing and Urban Development,
Washington, "Urban Crisis": 1057 Men-
tal Health Research Institute, 3:45 p.m.
SColloquia in Education - Dr. Fritz
Redl, Professor at Large of Behavioral
Sciences. WayneState University. "The
Emotional Problems of Children in1
School," January 18, University Elemen-
tary School Cafeteria, 4:00 p.m.
Physical Seminar-Dr. Julien Gen-
dell, "ESR Studies of Hydroxysemi-
quinones: H/D Isotope Effects in In-
tramolecular Hydrogen Bonds," 1200
Chem. Bldg., 4:00 p.m.
Zoology Seminar-Dr. Jon W. Jack-

let. Division of Biology, California In-
stitute of Technology will speak on:
"Transmitter Sensitivity and Secretory
Activity of the Eye of Aplysia", Room
110 Physics-Astronomy Building, 4:00
p.m.
Cinema Guild - Lloyd Bacon's
"Brother Orchid": Architecture Audi-
torium, 7:00 and 9:05 p.m.
Lecture Series-Prof. Brice Carnahan,
" Introduction to Digital Computers in
the MAD Language," Nat. Sci. Aud.,
7:30.
Colloquium-Dr. R. G. Lawton, "Cor-
annulene," 1300 Chem. Bldg., 8:00 p.m.
General -N oties
LS&A FRESHMEN & SOPHOMORES
ADVANCE CLASSIFICATION
SPRING-SUMMER TERM,
SPRING HALF TERM,
AND FALL TERM
(No Advance Classification
for Summer Half Term)
In an effort to minimize the time
required to make. appointments with
counselors for Advance Classification
(Continued on Page 8)

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