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January 05, 1968 - Image 9

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-01-05

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FRIDAY, JANUARY 5, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE NINE:

FRIDAY, JANUARY 5,1968 iHE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE NINE

Doxiadis Urges 'U' Graduates
To Construct Improved Cities

Over 200 students graduated
from the University in December.
In his commencement address,
city planner Constantinos Doxia-
dis told the graduates that man
must mold the city of the future
for his own benefit.
"This megalopolis will be a con-
tinuous 'Urban area which should
not crush man as it threatens to
do at present; but, built in a
human scale, it should preserve all
human values and help man to
develop further and better," he
said.
Doxiadis, who is at present
working on defining the future of
the Detroit area, received an hon-
orary doctor of laws degree. Re-
tiring University President Harlan
Hatcher also presented that de-
gree to new University President
Robben W. Fleming.
'Monument'
Doxiadis said that when the
University celebrates its 300th an-
niversary, the present Detroit and
00 Ann Arbor will linger only as a
monument. While only 60 per cent
or less of the city of the year
2000 has not been built or com-
mitted yet, man can still build
afresh 80 per cent ofnthe city his
children will inherit and 90 per
cent of his grandchildren's city.
"Our generation has inherited a
world which was still thinking as
the Homeric man, looking at the
past, walking with his back turned
to the future," Doxiadis said.
"For this it has paid with two
world wars, and for this it lives
in bad cities which are the result
of uninformed and unwise action
of all generations since the be-
ginning of the scientific and
technological revolutions."
"Great progress was made in
many directions, but not in a uni-
fied way leading to a better city
and to a better life for every
individual.
Many Changes
"But, unlike the previous gen-
eration, ours begins anew, under
the pressures of many changes,
torecognize a crisis in human
affairs, to open its, eyes, to turn
to the future, and to try to create
a better city for man."
"Our generation begins to turn
around, to turn its own steering
wheel, and to look into the future.
It does not have, though, the time
to complete the full turn.
"Humanity has been moving for
such a long time turned to the
past that it now has a stiff neck.
It cannot complete the turn."
Doxiadis concluded that to
complete the turn is the task of
the "young generation."

GA Surveys Fleming Stresses Building,
Grad Draft Redefining of Student Role
(Continued from Page 1) E majority--or of a minority."
right" to be interested in Univer- "I think there is really no ef-
sity affairs and to exert pressure fective censorship of the campus
By JENNY STILLER on administrators. press-even if you wanted it," he
A referendum on graduate draft, But he felt the legitimate said. "There are times when you
policies was distributed by Gradu- framework for student pressure is won't agree with the campus
ate Assembly (GA) during regis- University rules which may be re- paper-and this is true of the
tration in response to a request } vised according to the forthcom- press at large."
by Dean Stephen Spurr of the ing report of the President's Com- Classified Research
Rackham School of Graduate mission on Decision-Making. Fleming said that he will con-
Studies. New Framework sider the role of classified mili-
As of last night, an estimated "Students may feel frustrated tary research in the University
5,000 graduate students had filled because they may not get the following the submission to the
out the questionaires, which ask I gains they desire" he added. "I Regents of a report by a faculty
for student opinion on deferments hope to persuade them that stu-'committee studying the hotly-de-
and alternative service. ! dent can exert pressure within bated issue of last semester.
Stuart Katz, Grad, chairman of the framework we will modify." Selective Service procedures,
the ad-hoc committee of GA Fleming said there can be no Fleming feels, will not jeopardize
which drafted the questionaire, I simple answers to what should be graduate school enrollments next
explained that implementation of j done to remedy basic social prob- fall. "Only one sixth of the grad-
any changes indicated by the lems-and basic freedoms are in- uate students are in the draft
referendum has purposely been volved in the right to protest. 'pool," he said, "and how many
left vague. "We can't have a tyranny of the will go is still a question."

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336 So. State Ph. 662-4543
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Last month GA indicated that ---- -
they wanted the University grad-
uate schools to make a public '
policy statement, exert "informal r a

Protesters Spend

HARLAN HATCHER presided ov
ident of the University last month

Across

A physician, an engineer, and a
historian were named Dec. 15 as
distinguished University profes-
sors.
The Regents confirmed the ap-
pointments of Jerome W. Conn as
the Louis Harry Newburg Uni-
versity professor of internal medi-
cine, Chia-Shun Yih as the
Stephen P. Timoshenko University
professor of engineering, and John
Higham as the Moses Coit Tyler
University professor of history.
Regents 'have limited distin-
guished University professorships
to nine, and the three appoint-
ments fill that allotment. Each
title, which is held throughout a
professors's teaching life, recog-
nizes outstanding achievement in
his field.
Dr. Conn has established an in-
ternational reputation in meta-
bolism and endocrinology.
Yih is an authority on flows,
fluids, waves and propogation, and
magnetohydrodynamics.
Higham, an authority on Amer-
ican intellectual history, has au-
thored "Strangers in the Land," a
study of the movement to restrict
U.S. immigration, and "History"
an examination of the writing of
American history since 1865 in re-

political pressure." "If a change
er his last convocation as presi- is dictated, GA suggested a policy
rer hi lastof non-cooperation with the pres-
ent draft laws" to implement the
results of the referendum.
The exact meaning of "a policy'
of non-cooperation" was left
Cam pus vague, Katz explained, in orderE
to allow GA and the graduate
school to formulate a workablet
policy.c
lation to the broader field of Members of GA completed the
American intellectual history, questionnaire for the referendum
* * last month. At that time, GA,
Prof. Robert M. Howe has been members indicated that they
appointed chairman of the Uni- wanted the present draft systemj
versity department of aerospace abolished and military needs pro-
engineering. vided for "by other means." GA
Prof. Howe's five-year appoint- members were strongly in favort
ment, effective with the fall term of allowing all graduate studentsN
of 1968, was approved by the Re- to receive II-S deferments, shouldI
gents Dec. 15. the present draft system be con-#
Prof. Howe will replace Prof. tinued.
Wilbur Nelson, whose third term How soon the results will bet
as chairman ends in the fall. available depends chiefly on GA's
* * success in locating a keypunch1
The Regents appointed Morton operator and in finding the moneyt
S. Hilbert on Dec. 15 to be the new to pay for transferring the raw

Their Christmas in Jail

(Continued from Page 1) ,T
Court is always uncertain," point-
ed out Goodman.
The principle of the appeal t
contends that sitting-in, under
certain circumstances, is a form'
of "speech" and therefore coniesE
under the protection of tne First
Amendment. The Supreme Courtl
has ruled that picketing is so!
classified.
He does not believe that thef
state can "constitutionally findi
them guilty of criminal trespasst
when they are exercising their
right to dissent."
The protesters were originally t
granted a stay of execution by
the Circuit Court of Appeals last
September. This action prevents
Delhey from jailing them until1
their case is reviewed by the,
Supreme Court.
Although thirty-nine protesters
were arrested for sitting-i, 10
pleaded guilty at their arraign-

ment in January, 1966, and one,
a civil-rights worker from the
South, forfeited his bond and left
the state.
The 1965 sit-in has had far-
reaching repercussions. A C L U
state chairman Rolland O'Hare
said that the draft had never
before been considered for use
"as a device to punish dissent."
Twelve students were reclassi-
fied 1-A as a result, of their sit-
in before their case was brought
to trial. At least three of them
still have those classifications and
are engaged in appeals to regain
their 2-S status.
In addition some leaders of'
Students for a Democratic Society
(SDS) contend that the Ann
Arbor sit-in sparked a nation-wide
series of draft protests.

Call or Write:

Director of Nursing
Hawthorn Center
Northville, Michigan
Telephone; Area Code 313-
Fl 9-3000

chairman of the department of
environmental health. He suc-
ceeds Dr. Clarence J. Velz, who
retired.
The department with 43 faculty
and staff members, is one of the
major units of the School of Pub-
lic Health, and the largest depart-
ment of its kind in the nation's
15 public health schools.
Hilbert, 50, joined the Univer-
sity faculty in 1962 after 18 years
with the Wayne County Health
Department. He was head of its
division of engineering and sani-
tation and, later, assistant direc-
tor.

data to IBM cards, Katz said.
He added that the soonest results.
can be expected will be sometime
next week.
Current policy at the Rackham
School is to release no informa-
tion about any student to draft
boards, Roy Ashmall, president of
GA said. The poll's impact will be
"substantial," he said, no matter
what the results are because so
many graduate students have
filled out the questionnaire.
The referendum questionnaire
will be available to graduate stu-
dents during late registration in
the Administration Building.

I

':l

ISRAE L
CHOSEN OF GOD?

New Styles First atWild's
THIS WEEK'S ARRIVALS

What does the Bible say about
Israel and the Middle East?
Free book on this age-old
conflict available to Jewish
readers. New Testamenfan d
other literature also available
without charge. Write
CHRISTIAN INFORMATION
SERVICE
P. O. Box 1048, Rochester, N. Y. 14603

I

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