100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 16, 1968 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-01-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TEN

THE MICHIGAN lbAll V

7 T TT'i Q" A'%r Y A I"T A n*V 14? l fb&*

-- ,-.1111- 11.\ I.U .Et U.lNJ.5 Uj11 f -r * t1a ., 4

1'lLL:SDAY, JAiNUARY 16 It, 1969

9

Welfare, Integration
Go to Supreme Court

Sihanouk Asks Stronger
ICC Border Controls

I r

WASHINGTON (P) - The Su-
preme Court ranged far and wide
yesterday, its first public session
of 1968, by staking out for deci-
sion by June controversial areas
of welfare law, church state rela-
tions and school integration.,
Along the way, the court ap-
proved the merger of the Penn-
sylvania and New York Central
Railroads - the biggest business
consolidation ever-and strength-,
ed the labor department's hand in
supervising union elections.
Follow Old Tradition
The justices followed an old
tradition and issued scores of rul-
ings in one swoop. They had
closed down for a year end recess
almost a month ago and returned
to public session yesterday with
the following decisions:,
0 State laws that bar new resi-
dents from receiving welfare aid
for a specified time will be ex-
amined in light of recent federal
court rulings that they violate
constitutional rights, including
the right to travel.
1 A New York state law that re-
quires public school systems to
lend textbooks to parochial and
private school pupils will be mea-
sured against the Constitution's
ban on establishment of religion.
" The Penn Central merger, put
before the Interstate Commerce
Commission for approval in
March 1962, finally got the high
court's blessing in a 7-1 decision.
Douglas Dissents
Justice Abe Fortas, who takes a
dim view of excessive court inter-
ference with the judgments of
regulatory agencies in business
cases, announced the decision.
Justice William O. Douglas dis-
sented.
Fortas said, "we find no basis"
for upsetting the ICC's approval
of the merger. "We do not in-
quire," he said, "whether the mer-
ger satisfies our own conception
of the public interest."
An 8-0 decision by Justice Wil-
liam J. Brennan Jr. agreed with
the department that lower fed-
eral courts had taken too narrow
a view of its powers under the
1959 Landrum Griffin Law.
Once an election has been
found invalid, Brennan said, the
STAMP IT!
IT'S THE RAGE
afn NAr"1 $ REGULAR
TvsrA MODEL
ANY $2
3 LINE TEXT
The finest;INDESTRUCTIBLE METAL
POCKET RUBBER STAMP. %/" x 2".
Send check or money order. Be
sure to include your Zip Code. No
postage or handling charges. Add
sales tax.,
Pftutshipment. Satisfaction Guaranteed
THE MOPP CO.
P. 0. Box 18623 Lenox Square Station
ATLANTA, GA., 30326

department has the right to over-
see new elections to make sure
"officers do in fact hold office by
reason of a truly fair and demo-
cratic vote."
In a surprising action that may
have significant implications, an
Illinois man who has been under
death sentence for eight years was
given a hearing on a claim that
allowing prosecutors to strike pro-
spective jurors who are opposed
to capital punishment deprives
defendants of a fair trial.

NEW DELHI. India (W) - The
International Control Commission
for Cambodia met in Phnom
Penh yesterday to consider a
request from Prince Norodom
Sihanouk for a strengthening of
the commission's machinery to
safeguard his kingdom from bel-
ligerency, a Foreign Office spokes-
men reported.
He said the commission chair-
man, V.V. Paranjpe, an Indian,
had notified his government of
Sihanouk's request, made in a let-
ter. Other members of the com-

Soviet-Polish Talks End;
Seek Communist Summit,

mission are Canadian and Polish.
The spokesman said the Indian
government had been informally
in touch with "concerned coun-
tries" and would move in the mat-
ter soon.
The spokesman would not iden-
tify the "concerned countries" but
sources said they include the Unit-
ed States, Britain and the Soviet
Union. The latter two are cochair-
men of the Geneva Convention of
1954 under whose directives the
commission is acting
Foreign Office sources said Si-
hanouk was in touch with the So-
viet Union and Poland, both of
which oppose strengthening the
commission in Cambodia.
The informants said strength-
ening the commission couldbe
done by a majority of two-Can-
ada and India-but New Delhi
would "like to carry Russia and
Poland also with them to enable
smoother functioning."
The Foreign Office spokesman
said that by strengthening the
commission the international group
could help safeguard Cambodia's
neutrality.
Chester Bowles, the U.S. ambas-
sador to India, went to Cambodia
last week to confer with Sihanouk
about the commission and the U.S.
contention that the Communists
fighting in Vietnam were using
Cambodian territory as a sanctu-
ary.

WARSAW, Poland (P) - Top
Soviet and Polish Communist
leaders have just ended three days
of secret talks in Poland, an of-
ficial announcement disclosed yes-
terday. One possible objective was
to generate steam behind a Soviet
drive for a world Communist
meeting to deal with problems
provoked by the feud between
Moscow and Peking..
Current Discussions
The official Polish Press Agency
said the leaders exchanged "views
on the current international sit-
uation and the situation in the
international Communist a n d
workers' movement."
The Soviet side was represent-
ed by Leonid I. Brezhnev, general
secretary of the Soviet party; Pre-
mier Alexei N. Kosygin and Pres-
ident Nikolai V. Podgorny. On the
Polish side were Wladyslaw Gom-
ulka, the party chief; Premier
Joseph Cyrankiewicz; President
Edward Ochab and Zenon Klisko,'
a party Central Committee secre-
tary.
For World Unity
The agency said both sides ex-
pressed a wish to strengthen "the
unity of the world Communist
movement in the struggle against
imperialism." B y imperialism,
they meant the United States.
Poland supports the Soviet
Union's efforts to harvest as big
a front of Communist unity as
possible at the conference and at
Student or Teacher
to do library
research at University
of Michigan Library
Prefer library science major,
$3.00 per hour.
Write M.I.S., P.O. Box 5129,
Grosse Pointe, Michigan 48236

a preconference consultative meet-
ing next month in Budapest.
The leaders may have discus-
sed ways to swing a number of
national parties over to the idea
of a conference, parties such as
those in Romania, Yugoslavia,
Cuba and North Vietnam, who
oppose it because they consider it
an attempt by the Soviet Union
to dictate policy.
The Polish Press Agency report
said the talks resulted in a com-
plete unity of views and were held
in party like atmosphere of full
understanding and cordial and
sincere friendship.#

DO PRIESTS
Cut Ribbons at
Civic Affairs?
wrestle with
Bookkeeping?
*Balance the Budg?
Shuffle Papers?
Let's face it. There are some
things that have to be done. In
that we differ from no other
priest.
But - the Paulist feels he can
rise above the everyday tasks
that must be done. Because he
is an individual and is treated
accordingly, he is free to de-
velop his own innate talents to
achieve his goals. Individuality
is the keynote of the Paulists.
We depend on the individual
to make his own unique con-
tribution. We welcome it. We
all profit by it.
The Paulist is a modern man,
free from stifling formalism, a
pioneer in using contemporary
mediums and techniques to be
of service to God and man.
If you are interested in making
a greater contribution with
your life as a priest write to
the Paulists today for a special
aptitude test designed to help
determine if you are of priestly
caliber.
National vocations Director
PAULIST FATHERS
Room 136
415 West 59th St.,New York, N.Y. 10019

Subscribe
now
for the
winter term

j F I'
*.,.. 4,.
~ycH

tI

$4.50 per semester ($5.00 by ma il)
"rr wrrrr rssr rrarr rrrrrrmrrr rrrr rrrrr rrrrrm m r m mrr rrrrr rrm "
Send this coupon to
Michigan Daily Circulation Dept.
420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, Mich. 48104

ART PRINT LOAN
OPEN
JAN. 15-19, M-F, 7-9 P.M.
3rd Fl. S.A.B.
NEW SELECTION EACH NITE

Please Print Last Name
Street or Room No. Street o

First Name
Apt. No.

r Dorm Name

City

State

ZIP

__ _

Use
Daily
Classified

+ Use Doily Cicissifieds '+

I

.... . . .... . ......... . ......... . . ... . ... .............. ........... .. ..... ...... .

. + -rJ : r." "r..":.:.r...r:::.: rrrrrnv."vr ........... .. . . ..... . ..... . .. ....... ... ... ... .. .... .
.ro. r..+J.. .. J... r r... n r ........
J Y..................Y.....,............f...........::: .'r:::::::r.r................ ."::Y:::f11.i'Jr.:f:.... .:"r.:::1:1i ... . . . . .r .Y.a.,.:

Start

Thinking

boul

Engineers:
Meet
Boeing
Campus Interviews
Monday through Wednesday,
January 22 through 24
The many challenging aerospace programs at Boeing
provide a dynamic career growth environment. Pick
your spot in applied research, design, test, manufac-
turing, service or facilities engineering, or computer
TI'-----------------------

SUBLETTING
YOURAPAPRT

AEN

'. Y1!;Y/,.!Y:':"i":":^ ":'::::titi :J.n 1:Y:tN;N, eF
.{J
fi
'' S
f 'l
"
i
:1"'
; j;+
,1
off}
}}
}{?
i i
M.
:..ti
aa}
.$ ti
n;,,
}
;}
j
ti 1.
!
1
i Y
1
.i{!
'}:4
i :'rT
.^lF
:: t
h
"
, :L
JS7
":':;.
~}:
.:{
J
yh:
:' V
" '{: a
\;.f
!:' . .
".
'J
'.
Cif
4.
';.
r,'f,
y>f
;';"}:
.,mss
,:t
:",
o,.'j
ri
+
J {:
: : r
iti
':r
S .t
Y?.
$:{

,&I

*4

for

the

Summer!

Advertise in

'be

, frbizrn~

1*itti

I ..

a

4

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan