100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 11, 1926 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


SUNDAY, JULY 11, 1926
!.1

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY

0

B OKS
AND
WRITERS
THE HUMANZLNG OF KNOWL-
EDGE. by James Harvey Robinson.
George H. Doran company, New
York. $1.00
STARLIGHT: by Dr. Harlow Shapely.
George H. Doran company, New
York. $1.00
"The whole substance and aims and
methods of education-whether for
young or old-need a thorough over-
hauling and reconsideration." With
this state of affairs in mind, John
Harvey Robinson is editing a series of
books, dealing with scientific subjects
in a popular way with the aim of shak-
ing the adamant rock of public ig-
norance and indifference to higher
matters.
Mr. Robinson believes, that the ad-
vance of modern scientific spirit has
been due to what he calls its dehum-
anization. This cold impersonal light
is most desirable for the research
worker in his laboratory, but popular
appreciation can not subsist in its
glare. So, just as it once was neces-
sary to dehumanize knowledge for sci-j
entific progress, it is now necessary toI
rehumanize knowledge for the public
weal. Mr. Robinson sees three things
which must be accomplished if his
series be successful. They must en-
list the reader's attention. The facts
and information should be presented
in an order which will be understood
by the reader. And lastly, the signi-j
ficance of the information in its bear-
ing on the reader's thought and con-
duct and his judgment of others should
be wisely suggested.
The first book of the series, "Star-
light," by Dr. Harlow Shapely, director
of the Harvard astronomical observa-
tory, is the first example of this newer
education. As far as the second quali-
fication of its success goes, the book
is a triumph of clarity and compres-
sion. But the fulfillment of the other
qualifications is doubtful. How a
bald description of the variable stars
in Orion or the irregularities of the
milky way could influence the casual
reader's thought, judgment and con-
duct, to the extent intended is, to say
the least, puzzling.
But the most fatal blemish is the
doubtful allure of the book. Not that
it isn't adroitly written nor that it
isn't accurate and authoritative, for it

unquestionably is. Where the book
appears to fail is where most popular-
ized scientific books fail. They are
either written by authors who make
good reading but are inaccurate, or by
scientists who are accurate but dull.
Dr. Harlow Shapely, director of the
Harvard observatory, is a scientist.
The purpose of the series is distinct-j
ly laudable. The editor of the books,.
John Harvey Robinson, is a man of
the highest intelligence. And as Jur-
gen perhaps appropriately suggested,
good intentions should be respected,
however drolly they sometimes turn
out.
--M. A. H.

_..._._....r._

realms of only half-developed science
and foretell what was yet to come,
could logically discuss practical ques-~
tions, and above all, show us that lit-
erature is not inconsistent with journ-
alism. It is evident that Hearn chose
with predeliberation to make himself
an artist in addition to being a good
journalist.
We know him as an able translator
and an exotic writer but never be-'
fore have we met him as a critic of'
passing events. That in doing this
he had an almost prophetic vision and
at times foretold the wonders science
was destined to perform is shown

This is a boys' book in which are
related the adventures of Nahma, In-
dian Prince and heir to the belt of
seven totems. Nahma is the son of
the great peacemaker of the seven
New England tribes and while travel-
ling alone on an embassy of his
father's he is blackmailed by another
youth, jealous of his position of hon-
or, and left for dead. Subsequent to
his recovery he is-entertained by one
of the Iroquois, fights with the Hurons,
is captured and imprisoned by Champ-
lain, escapes only to be re-captured
by an Englishman and leads a miser-

.S

.&-1*4 Is a % m

West Wind lending library
MAYNARD STREET
THE LATEST BOOKS for RENT
THE SILVER SPOON - Galsworthy
AE

Classified Ads
WANTED
WANTED-Law student for position
in title and trust business. Address
603 Industrial Bank Building, Flint
Michigan. tf.
FOR RENT
FOR RENT-Room on first floor, eith-
single or double. Very reasonable.
520 Cheever Ct. Dial 8356. 20-21
FOR RENT-4 room apartment, furn-
ished or unfurnished, and also furn-
ished single room, 324 E. Jefferson.
20-21-22

PAGE THREE

throughout the

book. While sci-

entists were laughing at Edison's
Blakiston and company of Philadel- "useless toys" Hearn predicted the
phia announce the publication of a marvels that would grow from them.
book this month entitled "A Digest of He presaged photo-telegrraphy, the
Investigations in the Teaching of Sci- flying machine, and the creation of
ence in the Elementary and Secondary life in the laboratory which scientists
Schools" by Prof. Francis D. Cur- now believe is possible. Nearly fifty
tis of the school of education of the years ago he foretold the fate that has'
University. Ibefallen Germany since the war.
Early in his career he was inter-
EDITORIALS: by Lafcadlo Hearn. ested in eugenics, in the betterment
Houghton )Ifflin company, Boston. of woman's social position, in the hu-
$3.00 mane treatment of convicts, and cog-
This volume is a further compila- nate subjects. He has dealt with a
tion, and probably the last, of Hearn's multiplicity of themes in this book
essays which were printed in the New and has dealt equally well with each.
Orleans newspapers in the eighties. The range of the man's knowledge is
First appearing as editorials in the marvelous.
New Orleans Item and the Times- All in all, it is an interesting collec-
Democrat, they are considered his tion of essays on divers subjects, writ-
most characteristic work. ten in the best manner, and in the}
This collection snows us something Hearn style, which illuminates another
in editorial writing that is seldom side of the authors character.
found in present day newspapers. --E. H. G.

able life partly of slavery in England.
Finally he is pressed into a ship with
a group of prisoners to be sent back
to the colonies and escapes to reclaim
his position as the great peacemaker
to succeed his father. Through this
chain of events is given a great deal
of background material concerning
the treatment of the Indians by white
men and the red-men's reciprocation,
the method of obtaining Indians to be
sent to.England as slaves, the way
laborers were obtained for the Vir-
ginia colony, and the characters of a
small group of Indians, both noble and
treacherous.
The book is light reading, full of
romance and adventure and its great
value lies in that it holds a strong ap-
peal for boys who would not incline
to reading. As such it has a definite
place in our literature for the purpose
of interesting boys not only in litera-
ture, but for the purpose of arousing
their curiosity about history.
-R. L. P.

a~rgurvt B
arev
Zbop
Scientifically selected and
prepared foods
11:30-1:30 5:00-7:30
FOUNTAIN SERVICE
AFTERNOON AND EVENING
Open every Evening except Monday
and Tuesday
600 K. Liberty Phone 9215

FOR SALE

FOR SALE--German police puppies,
excellent stock. Prices right. See
Mr. Dickson, 312 N. 4th Ave.

19-20-21

LOST

LOST--Glasses in case. Finder please
call Dorothy Cline, 3651. 20

i

i

They are not mere political and social
discussions but, on the contrary, are
essays-scholarly, prophetic, and pro-
found.
It shows us that the dreamy writer
who elaborated those wildly imagina-
tive sketches and beautiful word pic-
tures could also reach out into the
Lunches that appeal to

i

warm weather

appetites.

"Therm, is a great need today for
authors to write of normal persons."- The dedication of Camilla York's
I Mrs. Emily Newell Blair. novel, "Livinia and the Devil," reads
"To Champagne and Crackers and All
ITHE BELT OF SEVEN TOTEMS: by j Who Appreciate Them Properly.,'
Kirk Munroe. Lippincott, New
York. $2.00 Patronize Daily Advertisers.- Adv.
NOW
PLAYING
ANN HARDING-ROLLO PETERS
And the Garrick Company
IN
A Comedy of Amerkau Life by Barry Delf
"THE FAMILY UPSTAIRS"
"A lot of laughter goes along with this play. Mr. Delf has devised
situations and lively conversations which invite merriment.'--N. Y.
Evening World.
"Will tug at your heart strings andl make you laugh when you
least expect it. Belongs on anybody's list of \hat Plays to See.'"
N. Y. Evening Graphic.
SUM fER PRICES: igts 2i5e to o ) ednesday and
~ -Saturday Matinees, 25c-5I0c- 75

for a small fan that gives
a big breeze. $12.50 for
a nine - inch fan that
swings from side to side
and freshens a whole
room. Larger fans at a
range of prices.
, But all G.E Fans-and
that means quality.

Have you tried them?
Tuttle's
Lunch Room
338 Maynard St.

THE DETROIT EDISON
COMPANY
Main at William Phone 4226
Nights, Sundays, Holidays, 8396

I

r
irrymmm

I - WOM..Ni

....+.

i 1
... .

BOBBING
A SPECIALTY
HARRY HARPER
BARBER
For appointments call 9616
BLUE BIRD
HAIR SHOP
Nickels Arcade

:il iiiii vii1 1 111 1 1 1 lliliiillli inltl lu v llill1lf14 IlIlillli 1it1tlli1lit1
The Lantern Shop
A Distinctive Place
for
Discriminating Diners
- 703 E. University Ave. Phone 6282 -
:11liifliilltilliillllitilillilltIlllltllilltlillilltitlittilllllllliltltlitI

1,

._.__.,_

"What awlale ofa difference
just a few cents make1"

}
F
1
1
{
f
t

There's real savings
in bringing your
laundry to our sta-
tion in the Press
building-- 15 % in fact.
Superior work, too.
White Swan
Laundry Co.
Ann Arbor 's Leading Cleaners

i '

-all the difference
between just an ordinary cigarette
and - FATIMA, the most skillful
blend in cigarette history. e

i

PHONES:
Downtown
4287
Uptown
21816

_ _ _

1

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan