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July 10, 1926 - Image 2

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PAGE TWO

THE SUMMER M CAN DAILY

SATURDAY, JULY 10, 1926

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___________________________________________________________________________________________________ I

S e mytg YELLOWOA L V
A splendid example of "yellow
' ja nt ournalism" has been furnished in the l TEO R
OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE recent hold-up of a road house in T_-/_

m- I

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
SUMMER SESSION
Publisled every morning except Monday
during; the University Summer' Session by
the Board in Control of StudenttPublica-
tions.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not other wise
credited in this paper and the local news oub-
lished herein.
Entered at the Ann Arbor, Michigan,
postoffice as second class matter.
Subscription by carrier, $.50o; by mail,
$2.00.
Offices: Press Building, Maynardw Street,l
Ann Arbor, Michigan.
Communications, if signed as eviomnce of
good faith, will be published in The Summer
Daily at the dliscretion of the E'ditor. "in-
signed communications will receive no con-
sideration. The signature may be omitted in
publication if desired by the writer. The
Summer Daily does not necessarily endorse
the sentiments expressed in the communica-
tions.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4924
MANAGING EDITOR
MANNING HOUSEWORTH
Chairman,
Editorial Board.....Eugene H. Gutekunst
City Editor...............William R. Breyer
Music and Drama......... William C. Lucas
Woman'sdEditor..........Julia Ruth Brown
Night Editors
Wilton A. Simpson Theodore Hornberger
Paul J. Kern Frederick Shillito
Douglas Doubleday
Assistants
Gail Lyons ~'haddeus \% a-i cle1,ki
tGeorge T. McKean Mor is Zwdling
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
PAUL W. ARNOLD
Circulation.................Kenneth faven
Advertising..............Francis Norut
Assistants

which three University of Michigan
students were taken into custody "on
suspicion." There is not substantial
evidence that they committed the
crime other than a mere faulty chain
of circumstances and all of the trio
have denied knowledge of the affair.
The place robbed was a blind pig,
one of those worthwhile institutions
which defy the law and demand its
protection. Although it is not a com-
mon practice among university stu-
dents to hold up blind pigs, or any-
thing else,still a few newspapers in
the state, with that characteristic
love of exposing any scandal that may
be connected however remotely, with
an educational institution, announce
the event under flaring headlines
which labels the men as students of
Michigan.
Well, what if they are students and
what if they are guilty? Is Mich-
igan to blame because some of her
students prefer using a gun to some
other method of obtaining a living?
Why try to put a smear on the repu-
tation of the school?
But, further, the editors of those
papers are committing as serious a
crime as they are charging these
yourng men with, if they are innocent,
For they are certainly giving these
students reputations that will be hard
to live down. And it seems to us,
that those papers which are publish-
ing pictures of these students under
the caption "Student Bandits" are lay-
ing themselves open to a clear case of
libel should these young men be ac-
quitted.

GHOSTS I
OF THE
PASTa
We were too lazy yesterday after-

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Edward Solomon

William, F. (CookI

noon to write our own column. SoE
we decided to inspect once more the
desk which in days of yore was Sir
Toby's property, realizing that our
previous examinations of the goods
and chattels of Rolls' Grand Old Man
had been very casual. And really we
found a wealth of good stuff that Tif-
in had been forced to omit because
of lack of space. Here are a few.
Others will appear from time to time
in future issues of Rolls.
(The first thing is unsigned. To
be perfectly frank, we suspect Hank,
who wrote that feature last spring
on the first robin, of being its author;
because this contrib was first hand-
ed in to the City Editor Nyho wrote
on it: "ROLLS! HOLD': FNOR A
RAINY DAY!" Ed. Note.):
With a click-click here and a swish-
swish there the galoshes season made
its official debut on the campus Mon-
day morning. Dainty silken ankles
encased in enormous protectors trip-
ped, and we use the word from per-
sonal observation, here and there
over the snow-flecked walks.
Popularity, according to one obser-
ver, is about equally divided between
the "Zipper" type and the ordinary
buckle variety. They are worn in ev-
ery conceivable manner, from chaste,
fully buckled ones to those gloriously,
freely, flapping.
The "half mast" is in ascending po-
pularity and will probably make a
strong bid for general adoption. This
effect is accomplished by rolling the
top of the galosh down approximately
half way. Unfortunately this style
forms a lump at the ankle wand tends
to pigeon the toes slightly outward
as well as producing other quaint ef-
fects. But as one woman said, "You
can not hope to accomplish such a
stunning effect as the 'half mast' with-
out undergingresome slight hardships.
An inquiry addressed to one tripping
Co-Ed as to the exact necessity of
galoshes being worn when the snow
was practically eliminated from the
walks brought -this response:
"Of course we don't need them,
Silly, but they look so sophisticated
and it's just oodles of fun to let them
flop.
A portion of the student body ac-
cording to reports late Monday night
was still holding aloof from adopt-
ing goloshes; but as one man said,
pointing out a passing unzippered
speciman:
"Wait till he has had double pneu-
monia a few times then he'll get his
zippers."
When its goloshes time at Michigan
Hank.
* S S

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-...
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MAYNARD STREET
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GRAHAM'S
Special Tables of Books of
Interest' to Educators
GRAHAMS
At Both Ends of the Diagonal

d

DANCE

WVANTED: A WIFE
AThere was a time when a reigning.
SATURDAY, JULY 10, 1926 monarch, had he expressed the desire
Night Editor-WM. H. STOCKWELL to marry beneath his class, least of
all an American, would have been
WHY NOT OPEN THE POOL quickly ousted in favor of a more
conservative relative.
TO THE IEGULAR SIJTUDENTS However, custonis and the view-
After much argument the Union Point of royalty have evidently chang-
pool has been opened to women stu- ed. For witness, King Boris has not
saeg xpressed the wish to marry a certain
dents of the University at certain reg- party below him in rank but he has
ular periods. One of the most im- sent out a blanket call for applica-
portant factors in bringing about this tions from American women who
change in the Union's inflexible rules might wish to be Queen to Bulgaria.'
regarding women students has been Twenty years ago a special;
the almost deserted atmosphere of the steamer would have been chartered
pool at all hours of the day,' Is fac- to carry the letters to the romantic,
ilities rarely being used by more than j king but the real irony of the situa-I
a handful at a time. tion lies in the fact that the job isl
In order to further encourage use not very alluring at the present time.
by more individuals of the excellent i The moon-struck young monarch will
bathing place, the directors of tl d, well to get an answer to his ap-j
Q,nion have opened it to non-residents peal.1
of the University, to guests of enroll- America has progressed greatly in
ed students. All this has been done to these two decades. Modern inventions
reniove the impression from the mind;r and modern improvements, with which
of those who helped in its construe- Europe has failed to keep pace, have
tion that there was no real 1ecessity made life so comfortable in America
for a pool among the building's facil- that even a queen might envy an Am-1
ities. erican commoner. To be the central
Despite this unlimited generosity on figure in revolts and perturbed polit-
the part of the governors of Mich- ics has no appeal to a girl who can
igan's men's club, a most ridiculous find plenty of thrills in a movie with-
and unfair restriction is being exer- out risking her neck. The title of t
cised during the Summer session in queen sounds hollow to the young
shutting out the man regularly en- lady who gets her own allowance
rolled in the University and a member without the discomfort of wearing a
of the ifnion during the school yeor. crown during this hot weather. But
Since he is not a summer school stu- then, being a queen seems so roman-
dent, he is not eligible because he Is tic !
a non-member. If he should be in
Ann Arbor during the summer and "Democracy is direct self-govern-
wishes to go swimming with a student ment, over all the people, for all the
friend, the natural conclusion to draw people, by all the people."-Theodore
is that he may go with his friend on Parker.
the same basis as any other person, -- -- -

I

Blue

Lantern

I

ISLAND LAKE
Nightly except Monday
Sunday Matinee, 3-6
Jean Goldkette's Vagabonds

I

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mr-

..

,,

,.....

F

Sir Toby Tiffin:
I shall sacrifice my only
affair in order to enlighten

real love
the Cam-

by filling out a guest card.
However, this avenue is closed to
him for the simple reason that he
has already paid six dollars for a
regular term which makes him, ac-
cording to the new ruling, 4ligible for
a life membership. Due to some in-
explicable reason, those qualifying
for such a membership cannot be
termed as guests during the summer
and are consequently shut out from
any use of the pool until the fall term
begins; his status is below that, in the
estimation of the Union's officials, of
one who has no interest in the Uni-
versity except for the fact that he
may use the Union pool for the sum
of one quarter.
This ruling, if it has any use, sure-
ly cannot be aimed at such an unfair
restriction. If it has a beneficial re-
sult in one direction, it should not be
so inflexible as to prohibit its modi-
flcation as regards the use of the
pool.
The pool is not crowded. this can-
not be denied. In spite of the hot
weather of the summer, it presents a
,more deserted appearance than dur-
ing the school year. Why, then. should
we exclude our friend who has al-
ready paid fees to the Union in pre-
ference to the transient visitor?
"The modern school boy is better
behaved and a better student than his
dad was."-Dr. E. C. Broome.
"Education is not an accumulation
of knowledge; it is an approach to
life,"-Dr. C. R. Myers.

EDITORIAL COMMENT
FIEEDOM OF THE PRESS
(The Nation)
Attempts to interfere with the free-
dom of the press, even when no ques-
tion of radical or revolutionary ideas
is raised, are far more common in this
country than those who live in our
great cities and witness the immunity,
of our powerful metropolitan dailies
might suppose. The fortnightly Du-
luth Rip-saw having printed articles
attacking the administration and
character of certain city officials, they
are trying to have it suppressed un-
der a law passed last year enabling
\a judge to enjoin the publication of a
"malicious, scandalous, and defama-
tory newspaper." We know nothing
of the justice or injustice of the Rip-
saw's criticisms. The point we would
make is that if the charges are un-
true, injured persons have ample pro-
tection in the ordinary laws againstl
libel and slander, by which a trans-
gressor after conviction by a jury may
be fined or imprisoned, or-if pro-
ceeded against civilly-may have to
pay damages. But the law of 1925
takes away the right of trial by jury.
and makes it possible for anybody to
suppress a publication upon the flim-
siest of charges provided he can find,
a judge sufficiently complaisant or
crooked for his purposes. The press
of Minnesota ought to wake up and
demand repeal of this dangerous and
unnecesssary law.

S
'
7
I
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pus in regards to this mystgry man,
one Joseph Zilch. The following bit
of poetry was received by me just 55
minutes before Joseph Zilch address-
ed an audience of students from the
tower of the Michigan Union last Sat-
urday.
Heartbroken
s Alice.
My mind goes back ten years today,
As I stand beneath this tree
To the days of my youth and the
great love
That you then bore for me.
I kissed you where you stood, Dear,
As we strolled upon the green.
And I admired your luscious hat Dear,
Which made you look so keen.
But those days are gone forever,
Sweet,,
I'm old and crabby too
And somehow your facial features
Don't seem to resemble you.
I wasn't called Joe Zilch then,
But just big hearted Joe
But I fear that I might bother you
Goodbye-adieu-I go.
J. Z.
* * *
More on this subject later.
Tif nif

Pw.

A

6a

LONDON.-The famous Egyptolog-
ist, Sir Flinders Petrie, has decided to
abandon research work in Egypt and
transfer his archeological activities
to southern Palestine because of the
"dog in the manger attitude"' of the
Egyptian department of antiquities
under the French director, Lacau.
ROME.-Charles Evans Hughes, for-
mer American Secretary of State, was
received yesterday by the Pope.

a1

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AM
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