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June 26, 1926 - Image 3

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SATURDAY, JUNE 26, 1926

THEE SUMMER MICHIC'zAN DATi.Y

TT1-I.S IJMMF MIC4IflNI PATlV- -.' ~*'~ VC.-AL A1A.L I1 F .J AL 1

PAGE THREE

1400 OLD GRADS RETURN
THIS YEAR FOR REUNION,
Animal Alumni Week-Ends Attrats
Maniy Former Stuidenits
Trhe annual alumni reunion this
year numbered about 1400 persons.;j
Although not so many registered as
in previous years, the class reunions
were well attended. Of the 33 classes I
which came, the largest were that of?
'71, of which former President Hutch-
ins is a member, '76, '86L, '95, '96. 'OIL,
'12E and '14.
Registration for alumni opened
June 10 in Angell hail where badges
and programs were given out. Sev-
oral of the classes dressed in unique
costume.
On Saturday the annual alumni din-
ner was held, followed by a miass
meeting in Hill auditorium at which
President Little gave an address. Dr.
G. Carl Huber was elected director
of the Alumni association. Stunt..
were given by the various classes.
The class of '95 gave an old square
dance. A novel musical entertain-
ment was rendered by Gor'don Eld-
ridge, Waldo Fellows, and Kenneth
Westerman, '14. The cup for the best
stunt was awarded to the women of
'15.
The number of subscription's to the
Alumnus this year is 500. This is
about the same as in previous years.
TOKYO.-A law to limit industrial
labor to ten hours a dlay and to elim-
inate work for women is being con-'
sidered in Tokyo.]

California Senators To Battle

Classified Ads,
WANTD I.
\vkNTEI) -Law student for position
in title and trust business. Address
603 I1ndu strial Bank Building, Flint
Michigan. tf.
WVANTE)----Two boys wanted ait once
to work for room at 611 Churchi
St. Only three-quarter hour re-
qiired a day. 6-7-8
\VANTlED- Youug andl healthy men
weighing 150 pounds or more to act
as blood loners at the University
Hospital, Apply at the House
Physician's Office. 7-8-9-10-11-121
FOR RENT
PO. RENT-At. 311 Thompson, two
blocks from campus, reasonably
priced rooms. Hot water all the
time. 3, 4, 5,6,7, 8, 9.1
FOR RENT -- Suite and two apart-!
ments. 324 E. Jefferson. 7-8-91
FORl. RENT-Rooms- 337 Thompson
St. As low as two dollars a week,
for a student. If two in a suite
or room. Hot and coldl water.
Best of furniture. Dial 6292. 7-8-9
FOR RENT --- In Maison Francaise.
single front room, well-furnished.
For woman. iMust speak French.,

NOTICE
BREW sutRCOSM1ETICS
A complete line of best grade cosni -
ics.
Approved by dermatologists.
A student agency desired, libera i pa y.
BREWSTER LABORATORIES
Huntington, Long Island, N. Y.
4-5-6-7-8-9

FOIL SALE
FOR SALE-Ford roadster, excellent
condition, 702 Oakland Ave. Dial
7807. 8-9-10
WANTED
WANT 04D-A student at meal times,
earn board. Phone 6813. 8-9

WVe JDoNot
Ner ve
on *VOII(IAY

P'rivate
Parties
Served

TIS, HAUNTED TAVERN
4z7 E. 1[nron St.
ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN
Plione 7781

0

DI' G

KiODARS

Politicians residing in California are waiting w'ith interest the primary 1120 Olivia, telephone 7796. 3-'a
election of that state which is scheduled for August 31. The concensus of
opinion has it that the election will determine whether or not Hiram John- LOST
son will maintain his Czar-like hold on the politics of his state. Senator
Samuel Al. Shortridge opposes himt. Ex-Senator .Jaiues I). Phelan is the LOST-A society pin with Greek let-
hopeof he emocatsforthe enaorsip.ters, I). S. :. Phone 2144"a. J018
ho e of t e De o ras f r h s n t rs i .E. University Ave.s

Sally Lucas Jean Has Revolutionized Methods

Cisco in 1923. She also organized the

Of. Child HeLthLEducation;U ill Speak LHer" e helthsection of the iWorld
of Educatinon association tons and at the

Keep the Summer Co h,,e.
Story ithn clodak
Ther e 'omething hapopening (every la y. a roun d
the u niv~ersityX 'or onthe week-end trig s,>tuet h i gyou
w"ant simpsliot s of.
And the sort of pictures you wAnt is h ' sot \youi
get with a Kodak.
We'll gladly de~monst.rate hiot easy a t: n in u xpenl
sive the Kodaks( are to operate, even if youl have h al
no ex perienice. N odaks are 1!a stnman- m do- amli to
course they're aut ographic.
Alutographic Kodaks, $5 w)a
Finishing that's right---in quality3' 11a (Itrice.
(We have served Mlichigan and her studeints
for 38 years)
Calkins-Fletcher Dru- CO.

According to the opinion of Dr. I health "gamie," so simply expressed
John Sundwall, director of the de- that every teacher and child in the
partment of hygiene and public health tland could understand them. Rhymes,
in the University, one of the unherald - stories, and plays were published to
ed prophets of the dawn of a new day ithis end.
in the teaching of health principles ismtoofpenighalho
to children is Sally Lucas Jean who children enlisted the interest of the
will deliver a pair of lectures here cthe otecunrhsefc-1
June 28 and 29. ing a radical change in the methodI
Miss J'ean has revolutionized tl of health teaching. "Th very language
methods of putting health information i o halth teaching has been changed1
before the children of the country and' zimogiteltrtr eeoe n
has naugratd th moern onc der the direction of Miss Jean," Dr.
tion of health education through the undwall said.
Child lHealth Organization of Amuer- I t
lca which was organized under her The first teacher fellowship in
leadership in 1918. The teaching of hea it hi education was held uinder her
health information in the schools was direct ion in 1 920, and it was through
vindicated by the World Federation of her efforts that the~ first degree of
Education associations at its conven- health education was conferred from
tion in Edinburgh in July, 1925, when the teachers' college of Columbia un-
it adopted a resolution declaring tlhat I versity. Mliss Jean soa'vd as health
the modern conception of health edu- 1education specialist in the United
cation is the "fundamental basis of States Bureau of Education upon a
all successful education." 'dla er ~ssfo 98t
The theory which Miss Jean has j1921. While she was in this post
' used has been that health information millions of copies of edlucation pan-
should be given to the children inl phlets that represented her new plan
such a way that they shall want to were sent to all parts of 11w counr ry,
be strong and well, and with this idlea and placed[ in classrooms.
In mind she revolutionized the rules Through her eff'ort s tho Belgian
of healthy living into the rules of the school health program has been plat-
Nearly Every One 4
lie PEPPERMINTs
Old Fshiond Ba
G11

permanent secretary of that organiza-
ed in the first rank in Europe, aftera tion.1
her visit there in 1921, and several Rcetyhespottgrabu-
fellowships for the purpose of bring- ness interests and national organiza-
ing Belgian teacher s to this country tionis has been enlisted in her child
werec established upon her reconilen-' health education program and at the
dation. She also visitedl the Panama p)resenit time these agencies are con-!
Caa oe hr seitoue i tributing material of iniest imlable value
modern health education program tointehatIedctoofhesol
the authorities, rehildm'en of this country. "Through
As chairman of the health educnjtion' her zeal she has made an unparalleled
division of the American Child Hlealth11 (contrib~ution to the teaching of health
association she w~as active in the es- educOationin iI e public schools," Dr.}
tablishment of 76 health fellowships it) Suid wall concluded.
this country and yearly conferences,
l and finally the first international con-A
Ternceof educational leaders and R iead the Want lAcs
healt Ite xperts was held in San Fran-1

:32t South Mate .14reet

Ann ...rbrr, Ilia!!~

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CAINDY

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FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
State and Washington Streets
REV. ART'I'HI'VW. STALKER, Pastor
DION ALD) TI IMERMAN, HAR(UARETI'H. STAIR
.ksso('ltte Dtre('tors of Student ActivIttes
10:30 - I 'stor's subject : "T'hie Bes sett."
12:00-12:45---Student Bible ('lasses at Wetiley liall led by Dr- Stalker.
(S : oo-7 :00-- Wesleyan Gu ild meeting at Wesley H all.

Dlivision 11141 Catheine St reels
FOU'RTIH SUNDIAYV Al"ER R[i lY
8:00 A. M-.--Holy Communion.

11:00 A. Ml.--Morning
Lewis,

pr'ayer anid set ion l1)V h ; ' Reverend .I Ecniry

4:30o P. M._._-Musicale; for students and nienihers of the Parish in
Harris Hall.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Huron St., East
It. Edward Sayler, Minister
Tit IYDOU)R"
S erm on.
student's will mneet professor
Stevens in chturch auditorium
at 11.:45 for conference as to
summner work.

a

UNITARIAN CHURCH
,o
State Street at Hluroni
SIDNEY S. ROBINS, ?Minister
10: 45 A. M.
Mo-rning Service

FIRST
CONGREGATIONAl
CHURCH
He rbert A. J11111p, Minister
E- Knox Mitchell, Jr.
'Janet iBerothi
irectorI' eli-ionis Edciation
10;. 5---Mr. ,Jutn}!- will prea( h
his last. serm lon before his
Vacation.
/ a:30 --Student, supper and chat.
Hiarry' Kipk e, siar football
player, wil spe,,ia on "solve
A thlieh' xpm'l, ees of
800---1! 01iou picture Srv. e
1-11,111 h 114) 11t a (on.

"THE RELIGION OF THOREAU"
"Thie power of Godt is thie worship he inspirea.''-A. N. Whitehead.

CHURCH OF CHRIST
DISCIPLES
('or. 11111 and Tappan
KENNETH It. BOWEN, Minister
10:30
"Has the Rainbow Lost. Its
Pot of Gold?"
Services each Sunday
during the summer,
Visitors welcome.

FIRST
LEWIS C.

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Huron and Division Streets~
MERLE HI. ANDERSON, Minister
I{EYMA!NN MRS. NELLIE It. ('Al)WELL,
Secretaries for Student Work
Offices. Lane Hal

First Church of (.A-lnt Scientist
t-09 Sontl II iivSion St.
9:30 A. M.-Regumlar morning
service, suzbject: "Christian
S-ien ce."
11:45 A. fA.-Sund iy school fol-
lowing the morning service.
i45- --Wednesday evening tes-
timlonial meeting.
The Reading room, 10 arnd 11
State Savings Bank building, is
open daily from 12 to 5 o'clock,
except Sundays and legal holi-
days.

9 :30---Church School.
10 :45-Morning worship with sermon by D~r. Anderson on "Thne
Greatest Disecovery of All,"
5:30-Young People's Social Hour.
6:30-Young People's Society Meeting.

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