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umwtr

ESTABLISHED
v1922

0frr

Dai41lj

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
HAY AND f NIHT WIRE
S8ERVICE

'U-AT. V XT T T ATr. 4A

VOL. XAV I.L No. 30

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN SATURDAY, JULY 24, 1926 PRICE rIVR CENTS

LU1MOSEN STRESSES
LOCAL GOVERMEN
ADMINISTRATION EXPLAINED IN
CONCLUINGP TALK OF
HEALTH SERIES
.CITES FOUR UNITS
The Famly, Then The Couty, State
And !ational (Government
MuIist Cooperate
Stressing the local government as
the most important factor in the pub-
lic health program of the United
States, Dr. Leslie L Lunsden ypster -
day afternoon gave his final lecture
of the series "delivered in the awi-
torium of the Dental building.
Dr. Lumsden discussed individually
what he considered as the four units
concerned in the administration of
public health, namely: the family,
local or county, state, and national
governments. In a community, par-
ticularly a rural oe, he said, much
depends upon the individuals who
comprise it. If they do not carry out
the measures made by the government,
little good can be effected. The edu-
cation of the Individuals in the com-
munity is therefore one of the biggest
problems of health work.
~"It is impossible for the national
government to draw up a single heealth
program for all commiuities,>? said
Dr. Lumsden, "The nature and co-
ditons of different countries of the
same state vary so greatly frm eac'
other that they have to lbe aproched
individually. The foundation of 9
health work must be a local helthlL
service, with a competent person on;
the Job to direct the work according
to his knowledge of local conditions.
To build up an efficient health service
in every community is our first ai."
"We need the general practitioner,
:ot the specialist, in our lcal health
service," Dr. Lumsden went on. thel
public is not yet ready to grant
rnoileY enough to maintain a special-
jp fil4 force. .There is any num-
~er of Aefinite activ~ti s, each of which
m WJ~e a. separate organiztioni for its"
tsr; n4pct 4 Iie "workxmust le
left, to the at a peltl ep4rtient.
But a fairly complete health aeryc
including nurse, sanitary instructor,
and a person to aswer inquiries can i
be provided for every county at small
cost, he explained.
~"Thp federal government, wh lq it
a 4 co-ordinated helth department
as suchr, co.re R v ,riopukihs of
health work in onneto Whoa its
other departments;' Dr. Lunsdtenc4J-
cluded. "This i a logical field for
true co-operation. We can do best
with the money availabe if ll organi-
;Zationa work together. I 3gpe t seeI
?P }lay when~ Congress will not be nig-}
when the tax-p.yers will realize thatI
the dollar spent on heth work is the
most profita~le investment they' cal
Mori WfirofJOP
InThe Phippines
MANILA, P. L, July 23 (A.P.)-Con-
sumption of wheat flour in the Philip-
pines has ipce~se u the last few
years. Figures of the bureu of com-
merce and industry show that al-

thogh rrk i s the chief Sspie the
'iljpinos are using b reeid 5 upp I~
pentary food generally andti i some
gases as their principal article Of diet.
Wh tInportatioi4s last yvijr wen
.70,00JQ tons a§j cqrpireii with1 45,13(}
'pps 3Q 2 . IF pxiifths carne frqtm
Wei~ther~am
pre"Ipts, With his us#p4jan dmni b e
regret, that today 'will be elen
warmer tbxn Teeerday,

-,-
__ _

Last Presentation Of French
Burlesque Slated For Tonight

NEW CABINET WILL'
ATTACK PROBLEMS
OF FRENCH MONEY

All seats for Thursday eveuing's
performance of Moliere's° "The Doctor
In Spite of Himself" were :sold out byI
7 o'clock, and people were turned'
away through the beginning of the
second act. Tie production of this
French burlesque by The Players has
drawn the largest advance sale of the'
season, and the final performance InE
Ann Arbor will be presented this even-
ing in Sarah Caswell Angell Hall at
8:30 o'clock,
Desirable seats may be reserved in
advance at Wahr's And Slater's book-
stores. Monday evening the play will
be given in the Pease auditorium,
Ypsilanti,
An interesting feature of the final
production of the season, Colin Camp-j

bell Clements, "The H4aiduc", which=
opens next Tuesday evening, is al
series of congratulatory telegrams
which have just 4irived 'from several
famous moving-picture celebrities.
~The author is now staying in Holly-
wood, 'California, where' he has in-
terested his personal acquaintances in
the present production.
The list of telegrams include mes-
sages from Charles Chaplin, Georgia
.Hale, his leading wryman, William Col-
lier, Jr., and Donald Ogden° Stewart,
the famous author of "The Haddocks
Abroad" and other humorous books.
The telegrams 'along with signed
photographs have been placed on dis-
play in the window of Slater's book-
store.

Old President1
Is' New PrenierINEW LINGU ISTICS'
Y ToOMRACEMAN
21.~ j N CIECESMEAE
4 AS ORE COMPLICATEID
- PROCESS

UECENTLY-PORIJMED (GRUUJ
CALLED 8TRON4 EST

is

MUSSOLINI WISHES'SELECT SUCCESSOR
TO XAN TAL'YIFOR PALBUKE

SINCE ,WAR
FRANC TAKES RISE
Slx .Former Premiers and A Former
Pres4dent Are Included
In New Body
(By Associated Press)
PARIS, France, July 23.-A new
French cabinet ,regarded as the
strongest since the war, is ready to
htake up the difficult tasks facing the
country,, notably those connected with
placing the coutry oaasound d-
nancial footing.
When Raymond Poincaire, three
times premier and president of the
republic during the World war, suc-
ceeded today in putting the finishing
touches on his fourth ministry, a na-
tional anion one, the franc immediate-
ly improved more than a point and a
halt to the dollar. The new govern-
meat is hailed withs the greatest sat-
isfaction by the Senate and welcomed
by the chamber by all groups except
the socialist, communists aid extreme
radicals.
One of Premier Poincaire's chief de-
' sires, voiced by him as he left Elysses

Extensloii Wol Not A ffect World
Peace IHoWei er, f aclst
Premier States
SIEM8 COLONY RIGHTS
(By Associated Press)
ROM 0, italy, July 2:1.-- Fajscisti
I1taly must expand or sfufcate, Pre-
frier Mussolini todiay asserted, but her

Rtegents' Exeeutlye (' tznittee Wire
TheIr AlproyAI of TUhe
GRADUATED I*R E
Approval h"8 been received by wire
fromi all rmernbprs of tile PRegets'
e~±xcutivro corpmittee of the appoint-:
mnent of Herbert G. Watkins, '12, at

Raymond iknciiire
former French president, now newrly
chosen premier, who has selected a,
remarkably strong cabinet to combat
his country's. financial problem. Al-
ready the value of the franc has
slightly risen.
Class To Give
Three One-Act'
Plays JuN 301
jMembers of the class. in one act"
plays, which is under the direction of

exteusjion, its no way presents iitipeat I reset marinager cof tlie An Iarbor
of tit peace of the world. ~a~ho h rneC~l oti~
"We are tirsting fqr power, for jtarhu h rig rs Itln
rjches and the prosperity so lon~g de- ; works, as assistant secotet4Ty of the
nied uts the Fasc~istl premier told theiv jpiiyersjtt yq '0c4 Pant Buckley
correspoildents front the As~sociated , .n Septerlhep 1, Mr, Buckley has left
Pres, "ut up mpelal~m resntshis position in order to accept the
no threat to the world's peace. Surely aa'rhpoteUnnflowg
the American people whose comfier- ;Homer Heath's resignation'"which will'
vial and econiomic empire stretches 'tk fetSpebr1
over the whole world, can understand take effetkiseatiMbr.Bukesa
MrndWatkinsize iithr.ounucktely's i
an yptiewt on tl' graduate of 'the literary college of the
needI to expand culturally and eco- University and has spent the greater
nonilcally beyond her border.
When Premier Mussolini was asked pr fhslf nMciaatotg
to tat th prcis menin ofhishe was born in Pueblo, Coloydo;.F(+
tosat hepecs main f n lowing his rdzto to p~.
oft-repeated phrase, "Italy's tinde- g graduationei he took n emplo,
niable Colonial right" and to 'tell how i eat ic S. etr ptr~nm cist, a re
lie intends to achieve the fruition of aftric S tyer,n saacos~e
them, hie declared: "Our colonial as-
pirationxs do not constitute a menace manager f t~ e teel B al
company.
to anyone. Italy asks only what is Atrtt er evc ntebl
iti~ir~pet~ar~l yeards dervice int theisball
~ tp ~r ~nI ~ hearing ~company, Mr. Watkin~s as~so-
just that she have.
'"Ours is the first succesi~ful effort ca isefwti t ebt-hg~~l
md~ than manager iii 1925,.

ralace .after presenting his ministers Professor Clarence Hunter of Ohio
to 'resident Doumergue is to have Wesleyan university will give a pro-.
a talk with Andrew W. Mellon, secre- grain of three one-act plays on the
tary' of the United States treasury, evening of July 3(0 in University hall.
who arrived in France today. The three plays choseni are: "The
The nu~cleus of the cabinet is fern- New Poor" by Ge*-trude Jennings,
ished by 'six former premiers, one "Will o' the 'Wtsp" by Doris Kalhuan.
former president of the republic, and and "liltventlg Dricss incl4Iprns dale"
son of another former president. OfJ by UtoJ'ad Pertwee. Thrre plays have
the former heads' of government, Prs-'been chosen 1by tho class aw represent-j
mier Poincaire will take, thefinance img it, tyhefforts.Other plays
mninistry with the 1)peirhip; M.; studlied and acted this: summ er byi
AEristid~eBIr~ia'l yill be idte cf, the {glass are: "Between the Soup and
forei affars; ,oji~i13rthot; will he ithe Savory", "A Sister"'s Tragedly",
mniuiter pf.irst~e i th vice pray- "Voces", and '"Wurzel-Flummery."'
ident Ra~lier s, t4i~~ et@ 11u lhint of I__________
ilrli~rinj nime§ilk the new comnbing-
lrcnleaving the Elysses jpalace CM LT PLN FR
Premier Poincaire announced that his j
ministry would make its first app'a- B/b RAILOAD M10.01U
ance before the h-Aiher. a4 deputies___
oni 'TuesO@x; : Mtht tide he would in-(yAsoatl rs)
ttt" i1c; i fjigai lmeasures. IWARHlTN("r aslIt 1 tn J

1PSYCHOLOGY AIDS
Students Have Left Field Of Loger
And Tujrned To Other Factors
1~For, An Explanation
.Language students of the futurek
will need to know physics, 'chemistry,
psychology, physiology, and mathe-
matics through the calculus, Prof. C.
L. Meader of the Russian literatur
departm~ent stated, yesterday in his
address on Bio-Linguistcs, the new
science of language.
Speech, simple as It appears, is one
of the most 'complicated of vital pro-
cesses, Professor Meader, explained.
It requires the use of all arts of tle
body above the hips, nerves, muscular
tissue, and glandular organs. For two
thousand years, from the time of the
ancient Greeks down almost to the
{ present day, language students believ-
ed that the explanation of speech was
to be found in the field of logic. Study
;:was based entirely on organized grm-
'mar. In the 1th Century, the expan.
ISion of the British Empire in India led
to the study of sanscrit, and the level,
opruent of comparative philology.
The develop'ment of psychology re
suited in a new view of the processes
of speech, though many conservatives
failed to, adopt it for years. Dscov-
tries In natural science Influenced
both psychology and language study;
especially the theories in regard to
evolution and the development of life
processesI Biologists developed their
knowledge 'of the protoplasm and
came to regard all life as chemical
changes therein, Professor Meader de-
claql,
The new language student is inter-
ested in three physiological factors:
chemical change in the nervous Sys-
tem,,glanidular action, and the speech
orgas. Speech is no longer regarded
as static Professor Meader asserted.,
but as dynamic, as a liberation of
enarSy. Part of this goes to produce
the sound waves in the air, part into.
the formation of carbon dioxide in
the blood. Language is the result of a
modification of -processes not original-
ly u'sed for communication. It is a
circle of chemical, physical, and psy-
chological processes giving the hearer
an understanding of the mental state:
of the, speaker.
Recent advance, in the linguistic
field has been made by biologists, noc
grammarians, the speaker explained.
Thero are three major lines of re-
sarch: first, there is the study of
aphasia, or of defective' speech or un -
derstanding. AS most such cases are
caused by lesions of the brain, their
study has led to a, better knowledge
of the localization of brain functions.
The endocrine organs "play =a large
part. Language is muscular work,
and accuracy of muscular control is
determined by the glandular and nr-
vous systems. Hypothyroidism causes
slow, halting speech. Last there is
the study of the origin of language,
and the manner in which meanings
have become associated with sounds.
Blo-linguistics' has aided the study
or phonetics Professor Meader added,
and has directed linguistic workers
from theory to experimental research.
INORTH SALEM, N. Y.-Having
spent years seeking the fabulousr
wealth of CroeSus in Asia Minor. Pro-
fessor Howard Butler of Princeton, a
friend of Woodrow Wilson, left an es-
tate of $18,924.

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to) c.I a4I~ 1 A4GLU1.Atall ~ j',L . 11u
already achieved th~e moral reliabimlhy
tion of our people. It will give them
prosperity.
"Italy 110 111tpoyt* u jon her, by
talse frieiids t1x idea that sh*; was
weak and doomne4 to permanent de-
bility; that sulbjectionr to th~e lnsults1
of foreigners was a fatal necessity.
"Fascisjn has stepped In1 to prove
that the par of woeful etlutris i aa
lie. lny i w k ,h attisig
foi. the power o long denieo her.".
A party of -nearly a hundred stu-
dents and faculty members left this
morning on the seventh excursion ofj

INTER-IRACIALMARRI DACE
IS PROBLEM IN wIl
HON9~l Ul,, Jty iXlA.P )-If i1w
terra9cia murri~ges i1. awaii continue
at Lhe present Ate, it wil l Ie a, wise
child after a few gemuers~tio) ,s. Wt 'a'n
knlow~s to wha~t race l1 1~s. ~cetairs b~e-
hA tged, in te ef of D~r. Romiauso
Adams, lead of. the departmeut ?
yociology at'thme Xtv~rstc ~fAt
T~~irty.-t . ho th arriages
" f }1 itte juinthe islands are with
wvamen of other races, Dr. Adams said.
More white men than women contract
lu4ter-racial marriage because there
ar'e more white men here owing to tbhe
presence of large number,;s. c,morsw.
j The pue hor~c' 'k-awilas n
! r2f i.ni« r cisnplri h and.

M
j
1
6
.i

the Summer session, which visits Put- i ri r,14t' Y C' ia~'2- i ~ i ax,'
In-Bay. The lgrqup, wili left from while the pnart-Ijawatian and the part-If
the interurban station at the corner Portuguese grounps are growing.i
of state and Paekaird :streets at 6:00 Tereu +f 'i iooi Ilg.
o'clock, will arrive at the island about maini t, s;, orkf asifesi
noon andi spend four- hours t h P r tAi ')
All ofth + pojii ! of historical a~n1
geologieal interest will be open to the 4m erice n
party, includin g the crystal caves "' -JnEx ii
which contain fine examples of lime- ,~ IiE hbt
stone formations and also t p i a F t
connorted.,1 k 4y, r. nxerporable BERLUIN, July 23(AP)--Nnexax
victory in tbhe Ba~tle of Lake Erie in. paintigs by Anieric~n rtl. s. are ex
the IWar of 1l812, which was fought hfaited .at, they nltern, tionhal 'Modern
near the place. ' rts ExhbirtiQb. at Dresden, the first of l
The gro .P will leavye for, home ai orut ;its lkind since 191,2. The xhib1tl ;>lt, t
4:0 o'lcAti trud, ax)vngfr wihaspfecianbuil, 'R as tli'een .
in AnArbor. bout f10 30toniight. Mr. coi st vice3,p~i~~ua
Russel C. H~ussey of the geology, .~- i ' .lts.ravwigs and sculpt ttre Qot
the saixiclert ~t are in, charge. The Amnerit exa ihitig,,) w itsed by
varj ois prlvate, cqMetors and dealersI
NEW YORK.-The aut r. of. "Th4e I Ju.st s s tt1ed MSates includes oils byt
Private Life of Heleu of Toy' i ~to , i es Pcin, Rockwell Kent,' Alfredt
make hhi debit a pian~ist. ]For 16. Maurer, John Sloan, Maurice Bede,~
years Profe$$or John E~rskine of Col- and Leon Krolt
umbia forsook music and devoted _-
himself to~ literature. iiow he is re- Neixxic, is holding its: automobilei
turuing to thq vocatioun of his youth. shovw this. summer,c

JUDOGE TO BE AID1G IN
CONTEMPTPROCEDINGS'
(W~jA4. f. y. 33-.-Cnty A.4'g
lp - 1, JargCie. today wa* ; sgue4 a
ipx A% 00,44A4 Jail sentences,
a ,,ixA t eotion judges and clerks in
whose precincts fraud is uncovered in
connection with the primary last
April.
The new move, which mayx Ai,ve,
several hundred e 1, ,00t election
offici!,1', kk".e Quaty, Interpret their
]V4404as agents of the county
court.
Charles A. MacDon ; q~4ecting the
special grao4,-, . i~aqutry into vote
fra i4, r amged tloyd E. Heth, one of
4s, assistants, to assist Judge Jr .
He declared the judge w~g uw also
empowered to 1.1: 4y officials who
refused , ,.40 before the grand jury.
POLAND.,LOQK 109 r~
lan ', tr Apolicy.i 'i et u -
tA elf. towvarcipeage a rn''a g
gressionu aait lie em~ighbors
ark. with,1ijt undofiaforeign mnis-
ter. les * told the foreign affairs
oofuinttee of the diet.
The foreign' minister stateakghat j
Poland's first, business t o concen-
trate on Impro~yenent and- stabilization
of h~.eT utrnal" affairs. Poland's poli-
cdes are so peaceful, he told the die,,
that he and war minister P4lsudski
intended to cancel the 'appointment' of
military attaches assigned to foreign
countrios,

VV 2)A i'.j v I \). , JUI iy .- I CPos-
sibilify o & it new trans-t :ztintentaI .
r~i}road was seen of~~i the anR-
noinceement torty, of comltio Zof
plans for a uerger of thriee ralroadis
in ,Iwsouthwest.
While it had 1 et ktrio i for some
time tha~t bS. Loree, pre sidtent of' the
de tar~ nd Htudls, and chatirman
og, thie board' tintdirectors of the KIaix-
sas Cit southern, l1lanned to merge
t4ljtatter road with the St. Louis
Southwestern and the Missouri, Kan-
sas-Texas.: Announcement that te4 pms
had been drawn up for early, submnis-
sigin to the inte rsta t oA mmerce' com-
mission arow,,,,,ii considerable interest
in ; , Nj xlssron circles..
T ea Room Earns
Students" Quota'
Following yht suggestion that each,
womaA, student of the University In-
gto way earn a summer quota of $15
each to he turned in #, the League
fund, the Kappa VKatpa Gamma soror--
ity establjRsiv the Kappa Korner tea
roorp , served lunchoivs and din-
n..xas at Commencem , rime. $132.76
was earned this~ way, and whe~n di-
vided amnr , he girls who wvorked
for i+ su~ccess ieant -m "earning over
?mod above th~e $17 .eh which, was
pledged. Tiv fK lowing girls were in
~har ' . ra ces Gorsline, Flora
TV) z~, iIRlzaheth Beard, Ruth Tuttle,
1 s*ther Tuttle, Margaret Uludson, and
Irene Field.
Receipts from the team room ser-
vice were a, ed, to by the sale oif Michi-
igan , ying cards and cold cream.
,ry, one interested in. tblese products
may call the, Alumnae, council at
Alumni Memorial Hall of#e where
order may be placed.

i
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I BASEBALL SCORES
American League#
Detroit 9, Washington 6
1St. Louis 6, Boston 4
Cleveland 4, Philadelphia 5
IChicago 3, New York 11
1 National League
New York 1, St. Louis 6
Philadelphia 3, Chicago 5
Brooklyn-Pittsburgh- (rain)
Boston 6, Cincinnati 2

CONSTANTINOPLE.-Ten
nearly 100 prisoners awaiting
Angora on charges of plottingt
throw the Mustapha Kernal
were liberated yesterday.

of the
trial at
to over-
regime

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