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March 01, 1900 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
U. of M. Daily, 1900-03-01

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2

THE UNIVERSITY O1 MICHIGAN DAILY

Puished Daily (Sundays excepted) during the
College year, at
THE UIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN.
Orica: The Inland Pes,4Henning Block.
Both Phonee t47.
MANAGING EDITOR.
F.ENGELHARD,'01 L.
BUSINESS MANAGER.
O. H.HANS.,'00 L.
EDITORS.
ATHLETICS, . . . G. D. HDNUTT, '01 E
T. R. Woonaow, '00 L. A. H. McDoeALL,'01 E
A. G. BnowoE. '02. E. J. B. Wooo, '00,
L. J.eMONTGOER,'00, W. D. HCKEY, '00 M,
The Subscription price of the DAmL is $2.50 for
he collegeyear, with a regular delivery before
non ac. day. Notice, comuanication, and
-ther matterintended for polication mst e
handed in at the DAILY office before 8 p. m.or
mailed to the editor before 3 p. m. of the 'day
revioue to that on which they are expected to
_ wspear.
Seahcription may he left at the DIL office,
4tpyee'e, oe Stofietsewtnd, or with Bsineee
aer. Subscribers will confer a favor by
aporcng promptly at this office any failure of
narriers to deliver paper.
All changes in advertising matter must be in
theoffice by 4 p.Tm. n the day previousrto that
on which they are to aoear.
LARGE CROWDS.
(Continued fron page 1)
tional land grant act was passed by
congress and provision made for ag
ricultural colleges in the states. But
no experiment station system was in
working order until the present sys-
tem was established by congress in
1887. At the close of the last century
agricultural societies advocated this
system but it was killed by the farm-
ers themselves. Neither this nor any
of the other reforms in agricultural
education were begun by farmers save
one. That was the agricultural ex-
tension movement.
The reason the Agricultural College
was not combined with University was
not animosity to the university, but it
was due to the fact tnat the college
was the culmination of a long protest
against the old system of education.
To have united the college with tho
,niversity would have been consid-
ered a complete concession on this
point, and hence the two institutions
were kept separate and distinct. But
that plea would not be made today as
the university has thoroughly demon
strated that it is in sympathy with
the work of the college and could well
conduct its work. The fact that they
developed away from their first aim is
the reason of toe establishment of the
short courses and of the extension
movement and intermediate agricul-
tural training scuools.
What have agricultural colleges
done?
They have raised the whole tone of
the farming community until it stands
away from that of 25 years ago. We
must establish intermediate agricul-
tural schools between the highsschools
and the agricultural colleges. We
don't need more agricultural colleges,
but we do need more intermediate
schools ant more agricultural high
schools. At present te only one is at
St. Anthony, Minn. The farmer must
now be educated whether he will or
no. And if he will not be he must be.
The farmer is most difficult to reach
in education, not because he is unwil-
ling, -tut ie will not congregate in
educational centers. So the Univer-
sity extension finds its mission. If
the'farmer will not go to college, take
the college to him, to everyone's door.
We would not have every man go to
college but every man must be
awakened and have his horizon
w,dened. The effort is now beini
made to reach out and get the indi-
vidual farmer, and the time is now at
hand when toe influence of an agri-
cultural college will not be measured
by the number of graduates it turns
out but by the number of people it
reaches.
The coming type of agricultura
awakening is coming with the agricul-
tural extension movement. Cornell
is now in its fifth year of this work.
Reading clubs and nature study clubs
among children have been organized
The purpose of these is to put every
one tns a proper attitude of mind. A
simmer school for teachers has also
been established. The teachers ar

here prepared to take up the teaching
of value studies with better success.
Tug WOMEN 0 5ECTCONV
The Women's Section met today in
the lower hall of the S. C. A. building. I,,,,1ait
It was quite as largely attended as French Cook in Charge
was the men's. Mrs. Mary A. Mayo FURNISHES FIRST-CLASS BOARD.
of Battle Creek discussed "Well-Brea
Children." She gave a bright, inter- REGULAR BOARD $2.75. I'EAL TICKETS $3.00. Short
esting treatment and introduced many orders promptly filled. Fresh Home Made Candy now on hand
h ppy illustrati os." 'abit and Mai with the famous Sponge Caramel a specialty. Pop corn balls
Maude R. Keller of the Agricultural and salted peanuts now ready. Come in and try them.
College. Miss Julia King of the Nor-
mal College took up the same general W S. PARKER
subject, cited specific instances and
made quite a few keen observations. 709 N. University Avenue
A BEET SUGAR DAY.
Today will be Beet Sugar Day. Dr. (ROOFS printed
h. W. Wiley, chief chemist of the United +++ ++...+4..- ++c.+<+; +.r++..!-
States department of agriculture, Wash- on Japan Tissue of the
ington, D. C., will be in attendance at
the round-up on today. In the forenoon
he will hold a conference with the beet1
sugar manufacturers of the state. In . -
the afternoon Professor L. H. Bailey of - /
Cornell University will speak on the
subject New Solutions to Old Soil Prob-
lems ; tc. Wiley will talk on Lessons of
the Year in Sugar Production, and Eu-
gene Fifield of Bay Cty on The Present Taken fror the
Status of the Sugar Industry in Michi- -o r
gun. In thie evening Dr. Wiley wvill, ' Ar 217 South
give a talkton the Manufacture of Sugar "'Stablers Art Store
from Beets. 4th Ave.

ph

.
t'
t

Unclaimed Letters.
The following letters remain un-
claimed at the Ann Arbor postoffice:
Arnold, .ev. Frank; Brady, Miss
Lulu; Cox, Miss Georgie; Cory, Rob-
ert; Connable, W. E.; Conger, Miss
Amy F.; Case, David t.: Darling,
Benj.; Gauff, Mrs. E. M.; Hettinger,
Miss Eliz.; Jorndt, Mrs.; Keefe, J. L.;
Keinedy, Lawrence;LKirkpatrick
Mrs. Maggie; Lewis, Lynn; Lanier,
1v1. E.; Matthews, J. A.; Osborn, Don.
ald P.; Oliver, Mrs. Frank; Rouech,
Miss Ella; Scherdt, Mrs. Mary; Smith
. G.; Sams, Wm.; Strew, A. W.
biltson, Walter A.; Stoddard Mfg.
Co.; Thomson, Mrs. Fannie R.; Tyler,
Miss Marguerite; Wetmore, Mrs. Ed,
ward. Drops-Birle, Miss Orfa;
Gumtow, Miss Ida; Horton, Mr.; Har
vey, Miss -ora B.; Taylor, Mr. Chas.
P. Foreign-Campbell, J. B.; Mc-
Curkey. Mrs. Package-Burgess, W.
A.
Milton E. Thompson, head of te
Thompson-Ryan electric company, has
been here the last few days to superin-
tend the placing of a new commutator
upon one of the University dynamos.
Trouble had been experienced because of
excessive sparking upon the commuta-
tor, greatly impairing its efficiency. Mr.
Thompson found this due to defective
connections in the armature. During
the repairs the other dynamo has car-
ried the entire load, sometimes 5o0 er
cent in excess of its rated capacity. To
relieve the strain a great many lights
have been shut down ear ethis past
week. Exercises in the gymnasium
ceased one hour earlier than usual. The
repairs have been completed and the
dynamo will soon be in position again.
Mr. Thompson pronounces the Univer-
sity plant a model of its kind.
Prof. Stanley spent yesterday after-
noon in the museum explainino the
Stearns' collection oftsosical instru-
msets. I-ic till repeat tse demottra-
tion today from 9:00 to 1t:30 o'clock
inth morning and front2:00 10 5:00
o'clock in ge afternooo.He will cx-
pain the general classification of the col-
lection and also the separate instruments.
'11s will be a fine opportunity for all
interested in music to obtain an under-
standing of these valuable instruments.
OLD ENGLISH
l~Hc
CUV EQC7IT
100 pl
[PIPE TOBACCO
STEBLER & CO.,
301 S. MAIN ST,
L _ --=z-_L=_ ::/:
JOSEPH GILLOTT'S
- STEEL PENS.
GOLD MEDAL, PARIS EXPOSITION, 1889,
AND THE CHICAGO EXPOSITION AWARD.
THE MOST PERFE -T O PENS.

.

A welcome offering when making a
call is a box of Hangsterfer's "most ex-
cellent chocolates. They are the finest
made and prices are so reasonable that
you can afford to give a treat often.
200 E. Washington. 316 S. State.

Agent for
Tribune, Stearns and Barnes Bicy
cles. Renting and repairing of all
kinds. LEON SHAW, t
117 E. Ann St
Typewriter Copying
Only 1ie per 100 Words.
SCHOOL OF SHORTHAND
707 N. UNIVERSITY AVE.

GAS AND ELECTRIC LIGHTING SUPPLIES, SHADES,
PORTABLE LAMPS, ETC.,
A SPECIALTY. SANITARY PLUMBING, STEAM AND HOT WATER HEATING.
J. F. SCHUH, 207 E. WASHINGTON STS.
f.,JIOLMES' LIVERY...
FINE COACH ES
INECFor Parties, Receptions Etc.
AND
COUPES Good and Prompt Service Guaranteed
Students' Lecture Alssociation Course
HON. JOHN TEMPLE GRAVES
Saturday Evening, March 3. Subject: "The Reign
of the Demagogue."
I+++
DAVID STARR JORDON
President of Leland Stanford University
Monday Evening, March 5. Subject: "The Blood
of the Nation."
HEADQURRTER0 FOR
Trunks, Valises, Telescopes, Dress Suit Cases.
Every Description. TRUNK AND VALISE REPAIRING at Lowest Prices.
HORSE FURNISHING GOODS.

307 South Maim Street.

ANTON TEUFEL.

POCKET SCISSORS FOR 25C AT MUMMERY'S DRUG STORE.

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