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January 13, 1900 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
U. of M. Daily, 1900-01-13

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2

THE UNIVERSITY OI MICHIGAN DAILY

U , 2j.L 2 blew sky, two Russians, perfected
asapparatus for securing greatly in
ci eased pressure. Dewar succeeded
Published Daily (Sundays excepted) during the in liquefying hydrogen and in produc-
College year, at isg oxygen and other gases on a larger
T HE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN. scale. Dewar's predecessors used the
Or BcE: The Inland Press, Henning Block. cascade system. Linde and the later
Both Phones,147. I experimentors used the intensive
method. In this the gas is put under
MANAGING EDITOR. j
F. ENGlELHIARD,'o L. rgreat pressure, two hundred or three
tundred atmospheres and then sud-
USaNESS lOANAGEB. Idenly allowed to go through a series
O. I StANS. . o; tubes where the pressure is greatly
'iCITOstS.
ATHLETICS, . . . G.D. HUDNUTT,'01E reduced. All gases expanding cool.
r. R. WOODROW,'00 L. A. H, MCDoUGALL,'01 E in the Linde machine which is used at
A. G. BROWNE '02. E. J. B. WOOD, '00, the University the pressure is first
L.J.MONTGOMERY,'O, W.5). ICEY, '00M, reduced from over two hundred at-

Th eubscription priceof the ti t Ueis slit °
the cllege yeae, withtasre gulae tellvey before
noon eacb day. Notices, communications, and
othersatter intended tor ublicationesut he
handted ia at theSDAtL ficbefrei8 5p. as or
nailed ts the editsrefel3 tp. is. si the clay
previosto thatox which they se epected ts
appear.
Subscriptions may be left at the DAILY ofice,
ieyer's or Stoflet's newstand, or with Business
Manage Subscribers will confer a favor by
eporting promptly at this office any failure of
carriers to deliver paper.
All changes in advertising matter must bein
Che owis evbyrp.i.a.o the day previous to t at
an whicheve t alar.
In charge of today's issue,
A. H. McDOUG ALL.
CROWDED HOUSE
Greeted Prof. Freer-Mang Interest-
ing Experiments.
The Unitarian church was packed
to the doors last night to hear Prof.
P. C. Freer's long expected, much
talked of lecture on liquid air. The,
audience came early and was thor-
ottghly interested and expectant. It
was an unusual gathering in many
respects. Some seemed drawn by
mere curiosity, but most oftthose pres-
ent were animated by a desire to more
thoroughly understand this subject on
vshich they were largely in the dark.
Many a comment and question could
be heard as they thronged showing
the speculation as to nature of the
lecture. The most of them did no'
ksnow just what turn the lecture would
take and this whetted their interest to
a teen edge. Something startling was
generally expected to happen but few
if any could tell just exactly what it
was. 'Many things did happen-some
unexpected-but opinion seemed di-
vided as to their startling nature.
The speaker prefaced his experi-
ments with a brief statement of the
various stages in the experimenta-
tion for the liquefaction tef gases.
The ancients had no conception of
gases as such. They knew only the
air, and the few other gases they
came in contact with they considered
impurities in the air. They thought
water came from air by condensation
ace air from water by evaporization.
This impression prevailed for many
centuries. Later on gases as they are
now known were divided into gases
and vapors. Vapors were those which
could be liquified by pressure. Those
which were elastic and could not be
liquified by pressure were gases.
Faraday was the first to liquify some
or those so called gases. By means of a
device in which he could scieret
low temperature under presssure be
succeeded in liquifying all but six of
the constant gases; these six were
hydrogen, nitrogan oxygen, carbonic
oxide, netric oxide, marsh gas. Cail
letet was able to liquify oxygen by
means of a device in which the oxygen
passed successively through three
tubes brought to a low temperature
by surrounding them with evap-
orating ethylene under a high
pressure. Olszenski and Wro-

tmospheres pressure to sixteen and
then to one atmospere. This sudden
expansion in passing through a series
of tubes over which too excaping air
flows reduced the temperature of the
air.
Liquid air is liquefied in the same
manner as the other gases but was
not successfully done until very re-
ceutly.
After this discussion of the meth-
ods of liquefaction which was illus-
trated by drawings thrown on the
screen the lecturer performed a num-
ler of experiments. He first poured
some liquid air in a Dewar beaker and
inserted into it a test tube contain-
tng mercury. The mercury quickly
frozc. This and several similar ex-
periments showed that the tempera-
tire of liquid air could not be taken
with any ordinary tnermometer. So
electricity was resorted to. Two piec-
es of different metals are soldered to-
gether. When there are connected in
serics with a galvanometer their cur-
rent is registered. These put in
any liquid produce a definite current
for that temperature. This current is
measured by the movement on a
screen of a bright spot caused by the
refection of a round light, placed be-
tPeen the-screen and the galvanome-
ter, reflected from the galvanometer.
(Contined on page 3)
SOLD ENGLISH
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gu RV E C(U F
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FOR A LE AT
STAEBLER & CO.,
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Typewriter Copying
Only 14c per 100 Words.
SCHOOL OF SHORTHAND
707 N. UNIVERSITY AVE.
NEW TERM
DAiNTCI-NG
GRANGER'S ACADEMY.
Athens Theatre
SATURDAY, JANUARY 20.
Sol Smith Russel's Great Play
0 *00KRLAT5 0 5ION
NEXT ATTREACTION
A Bachelor's Honeymoon

A High Standard
of merit in clothes making is gained
only by Continuous Effort. And so it is-in clothes dealing. It re-
quires continuous effort on our part to select that which is best from
the stocks of the many clothes makers in this country.
STEIN BLOCH CLOTHING
is without question the finest pro-
duced and is ahead in every respect of the average made-to-order
garments, at about one-half the price. It is that kind of clothing
which the best dressers are looking for, and realizing this fact we
have this season purchased an unusual Large Stock of Stein Bloch Suits
and Overcoats and are in position to fit all shapes and forms from
our magnificent line of this high grade make.
Best Line of Furnishings and Caps.
Always come to us for the proper thing.
Lindenschmitt & Apfel
Parker's Campus
C afe++++++++ French Cook in Charge
FURNISHES FIRST-CLISS BOARD.
REGULAR BOARD $2.75. 11EAL TICKETS $3.00. Short
orders promptly filled. Fresh Home Made Candy now on hand
with the famous Sponge Caramel a specialty. Pop corn balls
and salted peanuts now ready. Come in and try them.
W S. PARKER
709 N. University Avenuf
DO IT NOW.
Don't wait till they are all gone. Ladies heavy winter
tan shoes former price $3.50 and $4.00, Sale Price
2.90.

WfAIH R & M I ILL1R
THE SHOEMEW

218 South Main Street.

Goad Skating at the
ANN ARBOR
SKATING PARK
GAS AND ELECTRIC LIGHTING SUPPLIES, SHADES,
PORTABLE LAMPS, ETC.,
A SPECIALTY. SANITARY PLUMBING, STEAM AND HOT WATER HEATING.
J. F. SCHUH, 207 E. WASHINGTON ST.
IS NEARLY
P SEASON HERE
In ordering carriages why not get them where you can get your order
filled on time with a carriage. Ae have added five more to our
already large line and now have the largest number-of hacks in town
which will ensure you good service. Price the same.
HOIMF $' L.IVE4R-Y,
Phane 1006. 515 Epsst Liberty Street.
W~ihz~- -

Play an
ALARM CLOCK
HAILER'S JEWELRY STORE,
MAIN STREET.

College Pins
of Fine
Design.

EUTHYMOL TOOTH PASTE AT MUMMERY'S DRUG STORE.

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