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April 28, 1904 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1904-04-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

G. HI Wild Comipanly.
Leadi gMerchat Tailors
SPRING WOOLENS
For Suits, Top Coats and
Trousers. Full dress suits'a
specialty. Let us show you
our London Serges, London
Cheviots, Scotch Mixtures,
Kilowens, Blarneys, High-
lands, Edinburghs, Drum-
tochty's, McGugors, London
and St. Andrew Flannels,
London Cassimeres or Amer-
ican Serges. Please call and see
G. HI Will Comlpally
I E. WASBIINTON STREET.
PIT
Exciting fun for Everyone
45c.
Pocket War 1aps for. the
far East, IS5.
WOIHN & CO.,
University Booksellers, Sta-
tioners and Hngravers.
324 South State Street.
The Ann Arbor Savings Bank.
Catal Stek, $5,000. Surplus, $175,000.
Egeaures, 12,00,00
A GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS
TRANSACTEB.
Orrxcseno' Charles M.'Hiseock, Pres.; W. D.
HarrTmau ie Pres, l.T.Prm ZCashier.
* l p Choice Cut Flowers
f V r and Plants in season
COUSINS & HALL,
Cor. S. Univ. Ave. and 12th Stree
Telephone 151.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Entered as second-class matter at the Ann
Arbor ost Office.
Published daily (Mondayexcepted) during the
college year, ato117 E. Washington street,
(basement floor, side entrance> Phone 82 r
MANAGING EDITOR :
S. EMORY THOMASON
BUSINESS MANAGER:
ROSCOE B. HUSTON
EDITORS:
Athletics, - - - ROBERT K. WALTON
New,'- - - - J. S. BALsY
ASSOCIATES: -
Clifford Stevenson, Roy Peebles,
A. M. Graver, Henry P. Erwin
A. C. Pound. A. H. Ortmeyer.
Joseph Y. Kerr, Stoddard S. More.
Ida M. Brownrigg. I. Waite Jayne.
Geo. A. Osborn. Harold C. Smith.
Harry H. Andrews. Thos. B. Sims.
Thomas B. Roberts. Clyde L. Dew.
BUSINESS STAFF:
C. A. Thompson. Wi. R. Lloyd
0. . Koblit1s3. . K. Latorette.
Benj. E. DeRoy. Thos. L. Pekete.
Editor today-H. C. STEVENSON.
Subscription-Two Dollars per year, payable in
advance. If delinquent after Nov. 1, 1903, $2.60
Ofice Hours:-12:30 to 1:30 and 6:30 to 7:30
p. m. Daily.
Address-ROSCOE B. HUSTON, Bsiness Man-
ager, 331 Packard Street.
Telephone, 461.
CALENDAR.
Thursday, April 28, 8:30 p. n-Law
Social club party.
April 28-Faculty concert, University
Hall.
April 28, 5 p. m.-Lecture by Mr. E.
G. Routzahn on "Problems in Civ-
ic Improvement," in Museum Lec-
ture room; and at 8 p. m. on"'How
to Improve City Homes and
Streets," in Athens Theatre.
April 30, 3 p. m.-Baseball game, Illi-
nois vs. Michigan.
April 30-. L. A. nominating conven-
tion.
Mayt1-Address in Newberry Hall,
auspices S. C. A., by Rev. Spenses
S. Messer, D. D., of Detroit.
Sunday, May 1, 3 p. m.-Address in
University Hall, auspices of S. C.
A., by Rev. Spencer B. Meeser,
D. D., of Detroit.
May 7-S. L. A. election.
May 9-Southern Club dance.
Fall and not spring is here judging
from the number of "russets" seen on
the campus.
Tennis bids fair to be relegated to
the lost sports at Michigan. Four
years ago, before the new engineering
and medical buildings were built, we
had seven tennis courts; four on the
site of the medical building and three
where the engineering building now
stands, and all seven were in con-
stant use every afternoon during the
spring. The number of courts has
now been reduced to two, and obvi-
ously the number of ,tudents having
an opportunity to play tennis has been
correspondingly cut down. Nothing
could be more unfortunate than this
inadequacy of the facilities for tennis
playing at the University, and for this
reason any plan which will give a
greater number of students an op-
portunity to enjoy the gamp deserves
a hearing.
The arrangement of tennis courts

in the parks of Chicago and other
cities suggests a plan which would
seem feasible here. There are courts
are laid out with lime on the lawns
of the parks. A similar arrangement
here would relieve the congestion on
the clay courts. Temporary ones
could easily be marked off in front
of the medical and in the rear of the
dental buildings. The only expense
would be the cost of the nets. The
appearance of the campus would be
in no way spoiled and many could
play tennis who have not now the op-
portunity.
(Continued from page one.)
tended the East Division high school
of Milwaukee two years, and Madison
high school two years, graduating in
1896.
Entered the University of Wiscon-
sin in the fall of 1896 and remained
one year. Left college the next year
to accept a position in the Madison
postoflice. Resumed university work
in 1903, and in March won the 'Var-
sity oratorical contest. Is a member
of the sophomore class and an officer
in the university regiment.
Henry G. Walker, Iowa State Uni-
versity.
Henry G. Walker is a native of
Iowa. Prepared for college in the
high school of Iowa city. Entered the
University of Iowa with the class of
1904. Was chosen to represent the
University in the firt Hamilton con
test, January 11, 1904. Was one of
the four, the excellence of whose pro-
ductions entitled them to speak before
the Hamilton club in Chicago.
In the university contest for the se-
lection of the Iowa representative to
the Northern League contest Mr.
Walker was awarded the honor and
will speak in the contest at Ann Ar-
bor, May 6.
Thomas J. Meek, University of Chi-
cago.
Thomas J. Meek was born in Nash-
ville, Tennessee, in 1882. Prepared
for college at Central high school,
Philadelphia, where he was a nsm-
her of the interscholastic debating
team, and winner of the junior med-
a1 in oratory.
Spent one year in Dickinson Col-
lege, Carlysle, Pennsylvania, where lie
won the freshman oratorical contest.
He is now a member of the class
of 1904, University of Chicago. Was
representative of that university in
the Hamilton club contest in January.
In March he won the senior college
oratorical contest and will represt
Chicago University in the Northern
League contest.
George P. Jones, University of Min-
nesota.
George P. Jones was born in Rock
county, Minnesota, in 1877. Attended
highaschool at LuVerne three year.
Organized a company of soldiers for
the Spanish-American war. Was ser-
geant during the service. In 1899 he
entered Hamline University, where as
a freshman he won the college orato-
rical contest.
After a short service in the Phil-
ippines, he returned to Minnesota and
entered the law department of the
University, In 1903 he represented
the University of Minnesota in the
Northern League contest, and was,
awarded third placecIn March, 1904,
for the secol time he won the Uni-
versity contest and will again speak
for Minnesota in the Northern League
contest.

Tenns ackets
Perfect Balance.
Best White Ash Frames.
Clearest and Best Quality Gut
Stringing.
Workmanship a n d Finish
Throughout the Best Ever
Put Into a Tennis Racket.
You'll find all of these good
points in
ITE PUM at $8.00
-AND-
SPALDING'S GOLD MEIDAL
With Cover, $8.00.
For sale at
WAIH'SBOOKSTORES

t r a
Not a three-dollar hat,
hottfthe three-dollar hat,
The"VARSITY"
The distinction is in
the difference.
lallers il S. Rain SI.
"Don't trifle with
your face." Use
Willi a m s' Shaving
Stick.

I

f3 ddN fdddddddA~N~dAAAAAAN

T"E STUDENTS' LECTURE ASSOCIATION

0
3
I
I
I

THIS SPACE BELONO5 TO TH
S. L.A

fA' I M.. A13OLT, Mansager
MONDAY, IYIAY 2 The Record Breaker and
Pace Maker
John W Yogel's BIG IYNSTRELSA
A prodigious body of stellar lights of modern
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was ever seen before. 1NO. W.VOGEL
A NEW SHOW WITH NEW F'ATURES
Free Street Parade at Noon. Sale of Seats Begins Saturday. PRICES-25-35-50-75c
Seats may be secured by wire, mail or phone No. 364-2. Don't bu tickets on the sidewalk

2
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Season Tickets, $1.00 o, SingleAdmission, 25c

HER &KER ERHN TAILORS, t N. UNIVERSITY AVE

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