100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 04, 1890 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
U. of M. Daily, 1890-10-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

T"i
low
IBM
t
r ,
VOL. I. No. 6. Uis
ROEHM
--SON,--
MAKERS o1
FRATE NITY
271 Woodward Averue, 'Grard Circus
Park,
- - - ------
AN ENJOYABLE AFFAIR.
One of the most pleasant fea-
tures of Ann Arbor student life,
is the opportunity given for social
intercourse by the socials of the
Students' Christian Association
and by the young people's societies
of the various churches. One of
the most enjoyable of these socials
was given last evening by the
Young People's* Society of Chris-
tian Endeavor, of the Congrega-
tionalist chuich. The early part
of the evening was devoted to
Conversation, Then followed
light refreshments, after which a
short but pleasing program was
given:
Vio 0 Sol .........Master Spence.
Vocal Sole- - - Miss Grace Taylor,
Miss Marti a Taylor,.Accompanist.
Adress o welconie Mr. Wagner.
The company gradually broke
up, the verdict of all being, "A
most enjoyable time."
Chiarlie Garrison, Alpha Delta
Phi, '90, recently accepted a po-
sition with a Boston dry goods
house.
R. E. Dunbar is studying law
at De Pauw.
1'. R. Brandon is back for ad-
vanced work.
NIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1890.
PRICE 3 CENTS.
A NEW SORORITY.
WHAT THE ASPIRING CO-EDS
ARE DOING,
A Branch Chapter of the Kappa
Kappa Gamma Established
Here.
During the last two weeks un-
certain reports have been circulat-
ed around college stating that cer-
tain young ladies had formed a
new sorority. Last night, as our
midnight reporter was slowly
sauntering home, lie was startled
by seeing eight or ten young ladies
heavily laden with lunch baskets,
leading two young, blind-folded
freshmen co-eds along the street.
Immediately his ; suspicion was
aroused and this morning, upon
further investigation, lie found out
that a new sorority had been
started. The sorority is a branch
chapter of the Kappa Kappa Gam-
ma, the second largest sorority
in the east. The charter members
of the Michigan chapter are the
Misses Pritchard, '91; Sprague,
'91; Penny, '92; illnsdale, '92;
Penny, P. G. and Damon, P. G.
Seven more members will join
next week. There are a great
many alumnae belonging to this
sorority in the east, in town to see
the organization of the Michigan
chapter.
HIGH SCHOOL RUSH.
A well contested rush took
place on the campus grounds this
morning, lasting nearly three
hours. The juniors won the rush
with a score of two goals against
the one which the seniors placed
to their credit last Saturday. The
juniors had the advantage of su-
perior numbers, while '91 rushed
with more skill. Referee, Mr. Jos-
lyn.
R. G. McCall is a reporter on
the Cleveland Press.
HENRY M. STANLEY.
The Renowned Explorer's Great
Work.
When Cen. Gordon died and
his army was destroyed at Kar-
toumn ill 1884, Dr. Schmetzler, a
German Jew, commonly known
as Enin Pasha, was left in coin-
manl. His situation was very
crit(a lin the midst of untraversed
wilds and hostile savages. In the
summer of 1886, the report came
that lie could hold out but a short
time longer.
Mr. Stanley was in England at
this time, but as nothing could be
done, he immediately caine to
America. But scarcely had lie
arrived when lie received a tele-
gram to return to England. By
the 21st of January everything
was ready for the long and tedious
expedition and he set out for
Cairo.
At Zanzibar six hundred men
were secured as carriers. Banana
Point, at the mouth of the Congo,
was reached the 18th of March.
A vast wilderness of several hun-
dred miles extent still lay between
them and their destination,--a
wilderness so impenetrable that
in numberless cases the men had
to climb the trunks of reclining
trees, proceeding thus in the tree-
tops a short distance, then de-
scending only to repeat the dif-
ficult task soon.
Mr. Stanley's lecture to be de-
livered here is entitled, "The
Rescue of Emin," in which he
will tell of his many hardships,
the wonderful tropical scenery, the
great resources of the country,
the condition of Emin, etc. It
will not be a chapter of his book,
but an account of the entire ex-
pedition.
Wright, Kay & Co.
Fre Buyers, Importers, of Gems
ard Art Goods, Jewelers ard Op-
ticians, 'lnufacturers of the
Fine Soct 3adges rrade irqthe
courtr Smp sentupon pro-
per rrerrq,
1i0 WOOl)DWAID AVE.,
IDetroit,
M chi ra
SOME VERDANT FRESHMEN.
But They Will Soon Take on an
Autumn Hue.
Some good jokes are being told
at the expense of the freshmen.
A co-ed looking at Franklin's
statue erected by the class o '170
naively asked, "Did lie graduate
then ? "
Another freshman, not a co-ed,
however, asked a junior if fresh-
men were permitted to walk across
the campus before having matri-
culated.
But the greatest degree of
verdancy was shown by the fresh-
man who asked if they studied
botany in the observatory.
CLASS OF '90.
AN. E. Goddard is principal of
the high school at Marshall, Mich.
G. E. Mclwain is attending a
theological seminary in Boston,
Mass.
R. M. Frost is teaching Latin
and Greek in the East Saginaw
high school.
O. L. Miller has a position as
assistant professor of mathematics
in the Westchester, Penn., Nor-
mal School.
Coutinnue onsecond page.

Back to Top

© 2018 Regents of the University of Michigan