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February 28, 1908 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1908-02-28

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7 Hixi MICHIGAN DAILYr.

" . ...

Sam Burchfield's
ine Talorinj
Deliver
The
Goods
~am Burclifield
Co., 10O6.
EAST HURON ST.
.0ROWN'S. Drug Store
120 E. Liertyt.
ALARnI CLOCKS
1 $1.00 $150 _$1.75,
All tihe bset ake, a d fully guaranteed
MHWIOAN PINS AND~ FOBS
25c up to $5.00
IVBi-WSTCtI RIPAIRING
A PEClALTY.
Watchi4eapector for the Ann Arbor Railroad
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206 S. MAIN ST.
Branch 304 S. State St.
turkish 'alrd gyptain
AL W1ETADFN6 GBRANDS
; -'ASli PRICES
15c ' . r -2for25c
25J k. - .5 for x..00
MRS.J. R, TROJANOWSKI
IFASHI#NTABLE :HAIRDRESSER
Hair Hoods, Hairdressing, !shanpoong
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BANKS
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MAN AND HURON STREETS"
Capital, $0000, Srpus and Prfits, $65,000
General Banking Business. 3 per cent paid'
en Time and Savings Deposits. safety De-
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S.zp~F.S BID B C ash.. A. WiLL~laMS Aal
The Aw -ArrSaVftts Bank
Oapital'aloek, 150ut0. Surpus, 120,0
Reorces, 82,00,000
A enerl Brtsitp_1Buqlnaa Tranftitadl:
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iiaerimnt Vice Pre.:M.J Frite.Cahier
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AIRIDCTone

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tilriatian Martin Dan F. Zimmerman
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i. D. KINNE, liARRISON S0ULE,
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S 'W. CLARKSON, Cushier.
Capital, $1o0t000. Surplus-and Profins, *150010.

, -L

.E.,~ITRACES
{ COLLEGE 'DRAMA
f > ces and Dfsgufsoa Wore I To-
ginnirigs of tr r ch Drantatics
--aFaculty Often Satlred.
Hd rbert A. K ntyon gate a lecture
yiestrrday aft'e oodn on' "Le Theatreaa
Collegr," a subject' of secial 'inifereut
to nmembers of- the '°Cerele ' Dramiatique
Francais and other 'stoelesnts'.of the "Uni-
versity participating in ee..lege dramatics.
In, his treatment Mr. Kenyon traced the
developmecnt of the drama in the schooln
utnd colleges of France, which iu in grea'
PArt a' history of' the theater, whose
growth iu so closely connected with the
history -of the theater in' college.
"The college fetes,"' said 'Mr. Kenyon,
"at whichthter performnances of theatrical'
iieces were giveciare of a very old date.
Tile cartulary of one of the principal'
colleges-of Paris iii 'thefourteenthe cen-
leery mentions certain idays 'of thee year
whicte were devoted ,itorest andeter-
tinesntes. It cancnot he said, however,
theat thee theater, at tiss titme is such as:
swe neow'kecow it, btut ther festivals which
conesisiedi almost witteotut exception of
processioees; dances and disguises were;
the. beginniing of the draima. The; redt-
ords of tlse city of' Caen tell of the sted-
dents of its' colleges giving morality
plays' and "fatrces joyceses" at the dif-
ferent cross-roads of the city, on stqges'
drawvn tby hoeses. Fromstime',to time.
te: exuberamece :of the spirits of, the,stu-
cet 1e t eettninfe eeo trouble, and inicep4
i t le statute~s o1 the College, of Nda-
sarre we. fieid e proleibiteon against ;mas-
qeerads'saend'pantomimes' or 'ludum in-
leo e tithn as they ;were then called.
"The Chisteane drama was born in
else middle of the eleventh century in
else midst of'tile festivals of Catholic
essersteip at Cheristnsas. and Faster. IHow-
e\ver, tiss*'dratea became iransformed,
ilittle by little becoming, more profane,,
especially .after tier relinquishement of
else Latien tonege to tiec profit of the
Freinch, whtich. was better understoodi by
tee people. Thee satirical veime,'of the
studsents sparest io-one, not even the
faceulty or tite-royal family.
'leen tile courseof the sixteenth; cen-
testy uncderwenet ace extensive and radical
clhange, at once a revolution and transi-
lisle. Witls the reenaissance ihee religious
thseater disappeared and the comnedy,
s-lhiche pre-ecseinecttly_ constiieutedi the theea-
set of the mniddle sages, them took ther
place of thte imitations and translations
oef thee anceient itheater, thse mcajority of
the ;plays bceiceg giveneice Latin. Sincer
tee people Could clnot understand. the
actors a popeilar leatcv in Frenech grew
up alongside of the classic. theater.
"It was only. in 1552 that there was
produced on the stage the first French
comedy, Jodelle's 'Cleopatra' It was
witnessed by Dineg Henry II and other
great personages, at the College of

Recims. Withthie heginneineg of the hea-
ter en ties was' the meoveenet exteneded
rapidly;5 with thse result theat twenty-five
years later. almsost all ltce schtools pre-
sented clsneedies..or .tragedies. one festival
-day§ carf-;t the :distribution Qf.: pfizsee
$vetie 'nTritity collage .at-.Canbridtge
iwlys weN gigen,. durng. the:; Cleriamas
"Thyl Society of, the 'Jesuits, founded
in t$3j, gave .the principal and. most'irs'
portant progress: to dratnatic affairs, for-
u nder their leadership the theater die-
tveloped very rapidly. The Jrsuits were
convinced that draneatic exercises most'
-effectively aided in the development of
character and sentiments, in the culture
of te- mind and memory. They also
conesidered that the. bearing, the voice,
the ease :aeed grace of their" students
could be gained oniy by dramatic exer-
cises. The Jesuits and scholars as a
whole were instrumental in preserving
Latin as the authorized language till
1during the sixteenth century. Tie- im-
neense dranmatic prodeectioe of the Jesuits
1was de tthte fact that every professor
- of rhetoric was obeliged to furnsishe each,
ryear a Latine tragedy ice verse, of five
acts geenerally. Thcat which omne finsds of
neost origienality intile dranea of the
Jestuits eras thte 'balleis',ice Frenech, witiche
acoempaceicedltce tragedies, ice order to
Favoidthemoenotoeny of, the Latine verse.
In the Jesueit College de Loeuis le grand,
from 1579 I)to761t, 269 plays were pre-
-snimed. -t65 of whsicie were tragesti''
r:dranias, ' 35" comedies, aend 49 ballets acid
pastorales.,
."After .thce sueppression of the society
tof the.. Jesuits ice 1762, thce college -stakge
-fell almost into- disuese ice Franece. But
1it cacecest lbe. said theat the eeclinee is "coin-
-plete.- itlacy teuniversites of the United
States hasve takeee up the* presentaioe
of Freneh plays. Fromee1888 till eqofi
twcenty-five comeedies, elevee of :,whiche
twere' by Moliere, have been played' by
tcoll~e students.
Mf. Gofflos, a Frenchl writer-of a re-
cent hook oce college edramatics, says the
filowineg1of tProf. ileziat, Ilirecter et
regisseter of tile _Cercle. Draneiatique
EFrancais : "At WVest Virgienia teniver-
sity, a yotung Frenechmsane, M. Beziat de
Hordes, teas obtaineed, far above every-
thsing aced all others, mnarvellous results."
"Whsat," asked Mt. Keneyon, "would
M. Gofflot, the aletheor, say of our amia-
ble regisseur if lie Ihad ,seen the pre-.
sentation of 'Le Boutrgeois -Gesrtiloeeme'
last year?"
tee closineg, Mr. Keneyons said : "I wish
to the Cercle Drtamatique Francais of
thse Univerlsity of Micheigan' a emest bril-
liant.aced successflel fleture. Recall the
exceptional history of the college stage
en Franece aced I ame certaine that you
as menebers of the Ceercle will show
yourselves wvorthy of continuing aend ele-
vatirig it."
How those Michigeneda songs are sell-
ing at Root's l Whew l "When Night
Falls, Dear," is the biggest hit of the
season here, and there are: seven more
-close behind.

GikEAT INVENTORY
[Underwear, Shirts, Gloves,f.,
Trousers, Hose and t-Hats 20.
per cent offn Suits, Over=
coats, and Raincoats at 25
per. cent off.
Some old Suits at one half off
A Money -Saving: Opportunity
st, ebler C(_ Wuerth
Axn Arbor, Mich.
NEVER'' A
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THE ACME OP LASH
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