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November 26, 1896 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
U. of M. Daily, 1896-11-26

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THE UNIVERSITY OIV MICHIGAN DAILY.

MICHIGAN VS. CHICAGO.O
Battles That Have Been Fought
in Past Years.
Though the University of Michigan
has, as a rule, had consideraly the
better of it in her contests of various
sorts with the University of Chicago,
yet the time has passed when the stu-
dents from the former institution can
look upon their healthy rivals of the
Middle West as "easy." The writer
remembers that, when the Thanks-
gi 3ng game between Ohicago and
'igan was made an annual event,
there was considerable dissatisfaciton
expressed at Ann Arbor, because some
thought that there was no "real riv-
alry" back of it, Chicago not being
strong enough to make the meeting
exciting. That idea has passed away,
since the close and thrilling contest of
the past few years have demonstrated
that the teams "Stagg turns out" are
quite good enough to cope with, and
especially since Chicago won out on a
season's work for the first time last
spring in the series of Chicago-Mich-
igan baseball games. Only twice has
the yellow and blue failed to wave in
triumph over Marshall Field, but there
are likewise "three occasions to remem-
ber when the maroon floated exul-
tantly over the closing of hard-fought
contests at Ann Arbor.
Michigan faces Chicago today with
a feeling of confidence born of ac-
customed victory over the latter in
football. For three Thanksgivings in
succession the Chicago eleven has
been beaten on their home grounds,
though in the season of 1893, when
two games were played by these
teams, Chicago won the first of the
series by a score of 10 to 6. This
was in Chicago, October 21, 1893, but
on November 30 of that year Chicago
was beatep 28 to 10, by 'Michigan.
Sine that time Chioago has scored
but ones on Michigan. n 184, the
Thanksgiving victory went to Michl-
ganl only by 064, last year everybody
knows ho' 12 to 0 was the decisive
seers that Michigan carried away
from Marsall Field to inspirepllas-
ant dreams of future victory. And
now, with a total record of 50 points
in football to Chicago's 24, we of Mich-
Igan may well expect to see those
dreams realized today.
In baseball, this year was the
first that Michigan had not
demonstrated her superiority over
Chicago on the season's work,
though it was not the first yea-
that Chicago ha ewop, for her base-
ball teams have been harder to beat
than her football teams. The Decor-
ation Day games in Detroit began -in
1894, and no one who was there will
forget the many brilliant chances
that were necessary to save to Mich-
igan this ten-innings game by a score
of 3 to 2. Next year Chicago took
revenge on Marshall Field, May 25,
by a score of 13 to 1, our team having
)ust melo the longest trip in its his-
tory and having played seven games
one after the other. But June 15, of
that year we hai revenge at Ann
At'bor, for Chicago lost t to 4. The
story of last season's gautes is famil-
tar, and it is too mournful to repeat
how, after starting out and winning
games with ease, the Decoration Day
9ause at Detroit was prevented by
rain, then Chicago won the next
game, making the record two each,
god a fifth game was necessary. Our

compto ;y nerganized team made a
game fight, but lest the series and
championship nevertheless. These
last two defeats in baseball it is loft
for the football team to wipe out to-
day.
In track athletics, the first of the
series of dual games between Chicago
and Michigan was won by Michigan,
June' 13, of this year, on Marshall
Field, Michigan scoring 68 points to
Chicago's 52. These dual games are
expected to be a feature, and our own
athletic field will be the scene of them
next year. J. A. LE ROY.
-
- f
AwAtTING THE WORD.
Professionalism at Michigan.
Michigan's advancement in athleties
has been steadily along the best lines
Her victories on the football field this
fall -have been 1leanly and fatry won
and there has been no uspicion of
any t a nf professionsalis. 'Te
first ting totiet fromnte id lite
by the student wit ias cote to Ann
Abor frosn a stttll1 colee tvwere
football i.s not firmly established is
that Michigan players know how to
play the game us it should be played.
His first experience has perhaps been
in the wrangling, anything-to-win
style of game which unfortunately
prevails in too many institutions, but
which happily is passing westcward.
But here he heard at the annual mass
meeting in early October that Michi-
gan consides a game gained over an
opponent by any dishonorable means
the worst dofeat possible, and fur-
ther, he learns that this is practical
talk, backed up by firm setiment in
student body as well as faculty.
The only complaint against Michi-
gan this year, of which we have heard,
came from the Illini, whose editor
have parceled out adverse criticism
rather indiscriminately to comment-
ing on western athletics. The 'llini
attacked us on the six-months' rule
question, assuming that here was a
loop-hole foy professionalinsm. By her
stand on the matter Michigan has not
in any way encouraged the profession-
al spirit, but has contended that such
a rule should not work a 'hardship up-
on first-year men. There is nothing
in this or in anything else in conner-
tion with athletics in which Michigan
allows even a suggeston of profession-
lism. GEORGE B, HARRISON.

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'ice

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> ,

II

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