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April 02, 1898 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1898-04-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

nN UIMVERSITY OF MICHIGAN DAILY.

The' Store
A
Token
of
S Alm
Spring!
We have just received a
large shipment of
WRIGHT, PETERS & CO.
CELEBRATED
1F OWEAR~
FOR SPRING.
see. u, MM
New shapes in Vesting Tops,
$3.00, $4.00, $5.00.
New 3 Strap Sandels
$1.00, $1.50, $2.00.
Our entire stock of
winter shoes at a

Before Havin.g Your
Ph1e INSPECT THE WORK
The Berryman Studio
(Successor to Gibson & Clark)
112 West Huron Street, Ann Arbor.
JO .W O L U -T O I118 E. WASINGTON ST.
UP STAIRS. Ann Arbor, Mich.
HO ! DRINKERS OF COFFEE
Dean & Co.'s Blended Coffee is the result of th irty years experience
in roasting coffee, and produces in the cup a beverage of golden
color and unsurpassing flavor. We sell this coffee at 25c per pound
and venture the statement that no better or more delicious coffee
can be had at any price.
D BAN & COM PANY.
214 South Main Street.

A Problem to Face.
Yesterday's session of the Academy
of Science was opened by a paper on
"A State Natural History Survey," pre-
pared by Prof. Spaulding and read by
Prof. Newcombe.
In opening, he spoke of the interest
taken in the surveys by the states of
the south and west. The states of
those sections are charaoterized by the
most generous views and are providing
surveys to include all classes.
"That we do not know about our
plants and animals is a bold fact. Are
we producing nothing good enough for
which 'the public money ought to be
expended? In Michigan we have a
specific problem facing us, that of pro-
teting wha Stine we have left and the
land now laid waste.
The pine belt of Michigan was at
one time one of the noblest growing on
any continent. It did not grow in a
day, but took at least 200 years to come
to maturity. When the lumberman be-
gan his harvest he had before him nre-
sources w'hich had acumulated through
ages. By him it was transformed into
a new form of wealth. The prosperity
of this state has been largely due to its
forests. Has it not an obligation then
resting upon it to -take up the question
of forest reserves?
In New York pros isiot has beer, made
for forestry experimentation to be car-
ried on by Cornell University. For this
purpose an appropriation and 25,000
acres of forests in the Adirondack re-
gion have been granted. 'Wisconsin and
For, Forty Years

Minnesota are also earnestly taking np
similar questions.
Michigan ought to have a com issi on
which would try to ind a way to re-
store the for( sts. The taking up of
such praltical problems will not hinder
theoreticol work in the laboratory.
There ire three things which we
aught to have to aid the work, vii.:
There ought to iie an extensive collec-
tion of Epecial books easily available.
(2) The state should publish anything
that would add to our knowledge of our
plants and animals. (3) We should
constantly aim at spesalization and co-
operation."
Owing to the many other conferences
in session at that hour the le,'tare was
not very well attended.
Joint Session.
There was a joint session of the Clas-
sical Conference and the Schoolmasters'
Club yesterday morning at t o'clock.
President E. C. Goddard, of the School-
roasters' Club, presided.
The two main papers of the meeting
were read by Geo. B. Aiton, of Minne-
apolis, 'nd Prof. C. H. Moore, of the
University of Chicago. The former
spoke on "Principles Underlying the
Making of Courses of Study for Second-
ary Sch'ools." The subject of Mr..
Moore's paper was "The Enrichment of
the Classical. Course in Secondary
Schools."
Sn the discussion which followed the
first paper, Principal John C. Manna,of
Columbus, Ohio; Principal Chas. A.
Smith, of tte M. M. A.; Principal R. G.
Boone, of the State Normal, and Prof.
B. A. Hinsdale, of the U. of M., partici-
pated. Dr. R. A. Minckwitz, of Kansas
City; Dr. J. E. Granrud, of the U. of
M., and Mr. Lawrence Hull led the ils-
cussion on the second paper..

W. J. BoOTH, Pres. W. AnNotsinst Tie-prs
J. V. SaMAN, 2d Vice-pres.
Jon C. WALs. Asst. Cashier.
State -M ooill, -Bak.
Transacts a general Banking busi
ness.
Cor. Stain and Iuron Streets.
Capital, &90,000. Surplus, $S0,000. Transact a
general baking business.
R. KEPF, Pres C. E. nsEEE, Vice-Pres
FRED. H., IaLsn Csher
THE ANN ARBOR SAVINGS BANK
Capital Stock, $50,000. Surplus, 150,000.
Resources-61,1t0,00.
Organlzed under the General Banking Laws
of this State. Receives deposits buys and
sells exchange on the principal cities of the
United States. Drafts cashed upon proper
identiflcation. Safety de posit boxes to rent.
OFFtCERs: Christian Mack Pros.; W. D.
Barrlman Vice-Pres.: Chas E. Hiscock,
Cashier: it. J. Fritz Assistant Cashier.
FIRST NATIONAL BANKorganledArbor
Capital, 8100,000. Surplus and Profits, W4,00
Transacts a general banking business.
Foreign exchange bought andasold. Furnish
letters-of credit.
E. D. KINNE, Pres. HARRISON SOUL,
Vice Pres
S. W. CLARKSON. Cashier
C. . MAJOR & CO.,
The Artistic deorators
Have a complete line of
Wail Paper, Paints, Oils, Window
Shades, Room Mouldings, Etc.
Specialty of fine interior decorating
painting, frescoing, tinting and paper
ianging. Only the best of workmen
employed. Work guaranteed.
C.. MAJOR & CO.,
The Artistic Decortor,
KLEIN
LADIES' AND GENTLEMEN'S
TAILOR
Latest Novelties in Winter
and Spring Garments.
COR. WILLIAM AND MAYNARD STREET.
One block west oc University.
...OHIO...
Central Lines
T. & O. L. Ry. K.&WM.Ry.
The Only Sleeping Car Line between
Toledo and Columbus.
The Only Sleeping or Drawing Room
Car Line between Toledo, Colum-
bus, and Marletta.
The Only Drawing Room Car Line
between Toledo, Columbus and
Charleston, W. Va.
Pullman Sleepers between Colum-
bus and Chicago.
The Only Line with 4 trains each
way daily between Toleda and
Columbus.
The Only Line with 3 trains each
way on Sundays between Toledo
and Columbus.
The Only Line with 6 trains each
Way daily between Toledo, Bowl-
ing Green and Findlay.
The Only Line with 2 trains each
way daily between Toledo and
Charleston, W. Va.
The Only Direct Line between Tole-
do and the Virginias.
The popular line between Toledo,
Fostoria, Bucyrus, Granville and
Newark.

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