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February 26, 1898 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1898-02-26

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THE UNIVEltbITYLOF MICHIGAN DAILY

and this reacted on the university, con-
tracting its curriculum. This influence
of the church continues even to the
present day, though now its deteriorat-
Published Daily (Sundays excepted) during ing effect is not so great.
the College year, at

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN.
OGaics: Times building, 329 s Main St. be-
tween Liberty and William Ste.
MANAONG EDITOR
J. F. TuossA, '55 L.
BUSINESS MANAGERI
0. H. HANS,'00 L.
EDISTORS
H, B. SILLMAN, '98 L., Athletics.
H. L. Gissnu, '9 L. G. D. Hsnsev.'00.
Buvs~xa LAB, 'S0. 'T. . Woonow, '8
1. 9. CAMPBELL, 100. A. CAMPBELL,'99,.
F. ENELHAR,'98.
The subscription price of the Daily is $2.50
for the college year, with a regular delivery
before noon each dv. Notices, commuica-
lions, and other matter intended for poblica-
tion mst be handed in at he Daily officebe-
foe s p.m., or mailed to te editor before 3
S he ay previous to that on which
h ey ar te expected toapear.
subcritons may be lft at The Daily
Office, Meyere orStofit's Newstand, or
with Business Manager Sbcribers will con-
fer a favor by reporting promptly at this
office ans failure of carriers to deliver paper.
"The Idea of a University."
Last evening at the February meet-
ing of the Graduate Club held at Prof.
Russell's residence, Prof. R. M. Wen-
ley addressed those assembled on the
subject, "The Idea of a University."
The paper was a general presentation
of the subject; its particular applica-
tion to the American universities will
be given in a continuation of last even-
ing's paper to be delivered by Prof.
Wenley at the March meeting.
The speaker began by stating one
limitation of the subject, which is "The
Idea of a University." not "The Ideal
University." Things and conditions
must be taken as they are, not as they
ought to be; preconceived notions and
ideals should not hinder our presenta-
tion of the facts of the case. Proceed-
ing, he spoke in substance as follows:
"The beginnings of the university are
shrouded by the crystalization of tra-
dition and the hardening into belief of
middle age fables concerning the uni-
versity. The terms 'studium generale,'
'universitas,' - 'facultas,' 'magester,'
etc., have been handed down to us in
garbled interpretations. All we can
say is that the university sprang from
the idea of association and organiza-
tion at the beginning of the 13th cen-
tury.
"The three conditions of a real 'stud-
Win generals' were: 1. That the school
be open to the public, that it be gen-
eral. 2. That its aim be higher educa-
tion, the fostering of a love for classic
study and true knowledge. 3. It must
also be well manned, have a fine corps
of instructors. These three ideas sur-
vive in their general aspect to the pres-
ent day.
"But there was one thing connected
with the medieval university which
was to cause it infinite good and in-
finite harm: that thing was the inti-
mate connection of the church and the
university. The benefits of this asso-
ciation to the university were a supply
of students who had their expenses
paid through their positions in the
church. This steady clientile was a
godsend to the early university. The
harm was that the sectarian learning
had been running in a narrow groove

"In studying the different ideas em-
bodied in universities we find that two
different ideals were at work which
struggled for the mastery. The first
ideal was that the university is a place
of training for the 'students, and that
this object should supercede all others.
The second ideal was that the higher
institutions of learning should be a
place for original research, a spot fitted
for mere learning as such.
"The English universities are a type
of the first ideal. Their great aim is to
educate ..the students, to mould their
character, to make them able to meet
life as it is. Because of this aim they
have turned out noble characters and
very fine gentlemen, who have been an
honor to Britain and whose deeds are
her pride. On the other hand the Eng-
lish universities have only turned out
one 'magnus opus' in the last 30 years.
"The German universities stand for
the ideal of learning as sucs. Their
idea is merely to impart the finest
scholarship and scientific training, pos-
sible to their students: the instructors
do not consider themselves at all re-
sponsible for their morals. Their repu-
tation depends on their original
thoughts and work. They can main-
tain a high scholarship because their
average student on entrance has as
much knowledge as our A. B. For
these facts the German schools have
produced greater works and have bet-
ter men than any colleges in the
world."
IF YOU WANT THE BEST
FRATERNITY STATIONERY,
BADGES OR PINS
Send to
SMITH, STURGEON & CO.,
237, 239, 241 Woodard Ave.. Detroit.
Designs and estimates furnished on all work
of this kind.

3efor. Having Youzr
INSPECT THE W ORK
The Berryman Studio
(Successor to Gibson & Clark)
112 West Huron Street, Ann Arbor.
TO.NIG)HT
You will miss the opportunity of youf life
time if you fail to hear
- SQUSA'S-
WORLD'S FAMOUS BAND
AT U NIVERSITY HALL.
The S. L. A. Board have decided to place the prices within the
reach of all.

RESERVED SEATS 75C AND $1.004

GENERAL ADMISSION 50.

Reserved Seats on sale at Palmer's Drug Store, State St., Wednesday,
9 to 12 o'clock ; Thursday, 9 to 12; and all day Friday and Saturday.
Season Ticket for Remaining Numbers $1.00.
Reserved Ticket for Remaining 11umbers 25c extra.
The Shoe Store's
A busy place and humming with good news all the time.
There's a new story for every day, though it's always to the
same effect: better shoes for less money. There are five
chapters for this week.
Y YT V . A .RJILL.,119 F. WASHINGTON ST.

RESERYED FOR U. OF M.
Representatives of Charles Dudley Warner's
Library ,of the Worlds Best Literature
Are in Ann Arbor for a short time with a limited number of sets of the first edition of this
splendid work. IMMEDIATE ACTION is necessary to secure one of these sets at the low
introductory price and on easy terms. The last volumes, now in press, will soon be com-
pleted and the introductory offer will then he withdrawn.
Harvard, Yale, Princeton, U. Of P., and other leading universities have secured nearly
one-third of the first edition. A limited number of sets of this edition has been reserved for the
students of Michigan.
20 volumes now completed and ready for delivery and are on exhibition at the Harper's
Weekly Club Offlce, ,p8 S: State St.
For full information concerning THE INTRODUCTORY offer and SPECIAL student rate call on o
address
arperWeekly Club,
Of lce Hours: 1 to 8 p. m. 818 South State Street.

I

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