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October 24, 1898 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1898-10-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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VOL. IX, No. 25. ANN ARBOR, MICH., MONDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1898. FOUR PAGES.

NV IJ3"

H FINE FALL SUITINGS.
E*

T
H
E

T WE CARRY THE LARGEST T
A STOCK A
IN THE CITY.
L L
R 108 E. WASHINGTON ST. 0
R R
You May Have
Forgotten
YOUR TOOTH BRUSH,
YOUR BLACKING BRUSH, $
or YOUR WHISK-BROOM,
The one you have may bescorn out,
andyoumay wanttoreplaceit. We
have theman all iup-to-date style.
Our line ofDruggist's sunaries is
complete.
WILDER'S PHARMACY +
336 South Statectreet.
f++ +++++++++ff++
DON'T FORGET
the OLD RELIABLE
House. Hot and cold lunches
at all hours. Chocolates and Ice
Cream Soda Water, Pipes, Cigars and
Tobacco, and full line of Smoking Sup-
plies. R. E. JOLLY & CO.
308 So. State Street.
Warradd
Tooth Brushs
The Tooth Brushes that
I sell for 25c, or more, are
good brushes, and are
well made. If you should
get one that s-feds its
bristles
I WILL
REPLACE IT.
E. E. CALKINS.
FOOTBALL CLOTHING
GYM. SUITS AND
SWEATERS.
OurS stock is the most
complete is the city, sad We Can
Save Yous a tI iddle-mana's Prafit,
as we buy them from the manufac-
tuereeandrhave them made to our
special order.
TWO STORES
Up Town Down Down
State St. Opp. Court House
Plain Street

EXCEEDED EXPECTATIONS
'Varsity Defeated Notre Dame Sat-
urday by a Big Score.
Hardly a student in the Univer-
sity expected the result of Saturday's
game to be as itw as. Even thos
who were sure that Michigan would
win would not have dared to say that
Notre Dame would not at least score.
But such was the result and the 'Vaa-
sity -won by a score of 23 to 0, in
two halves of 20 minutes each.
Michigan played the best game by
far that she has played this year and
her defensive work was immense.
Although the field was muddy and
slippery and the Notre Dames had
the advantage in weight, the 'Var-
sity had no dif~culty whatever in
holdisg the visitors every time they
got the ball. Only once in the en-
tire game did Notre Dame make a
gain through our lne and that was
for but six yards. The 'Varsity also
played a fine offensive game. Browns
at centerdid magnificent work against
the big 250 pound giant opposed to
him. Not Conce did the big Notre
Dame centre get through Brown and
on the other hand our man was able'
to get Eggeman out of the way
whenever necessary.
For the 'Varsity every man played
well and their work is very encour-
aging to the coaches. Caley did
even better than usual and made his
distance every time he was called on,1
havingthree touchdowns to his credit'
and played a bard defensive game.
The work of the halfbacks, Widman
and Barabe, deserves special men-
tion, the long gains of the former
being features of the game. Snow
did the punting for Michigan and
easily had the better of the Notre
Dame fullback when it came to an
exchange of punts. Snow punts
much better than any other man on
the 'Varsity and will always do this
work in future games.
Notre Dame kicked off to the 40-
yard line. Barabee made 5, Steckle
bucked for 5 more and Michigan got
10 yards for interference with center.
On the next play Widman made 45
yards around right to Notre Dame's
3-yard line and Caley bucked for a
touchdown after four minutes of
play. Snow missed goal.
The next kick off was to Michi-
gan's 10-yard line and Snow returned
it 25 yards Notre Dame could not
advance the ball, and punted. Mich-
igan worked the ball back to Notre
Dame's 49-yard line, where holding
gave them the ball, but Michigan
got it soon on a fumble. Snow punted
40 yards, but the visitors could not
advance it so punted. Snow returned
the punt and Michigan got the ball.
Widman made 30 yards around end,
Barabee made 10 and Caley again
bucked for a touchdown. Snow
kicked goal.
Snow caught the next kickoff and
on the first play punted 60 yards to
Notre Dame's 25-yard line, when
time was called, with the score 11 to
0. The kick was the best made this
year on the field.
Caley kicked off in the second half
and got down the field quick enough
to fall on the ball. By some good

hard line bucking and two pretty end Athletic Association Subscriptions
runs by the backs Michigan scores a Paid to Date.
touchdown in exactly 2 minutes and Phi Kappa Psi. . . .....---.---..$100.00
15 seconds, the fastest work done this Sigma Chi. . . ...... . .. . . . . 75.00
season. Snow kicked goal. Zeta Psi....---------50.00
Notre Dame kicks out of bounds Sigma Phi. - 50.00
and gets the ball on our 15 yard Ciii Psi....-..-..-..-.. -50.00
line. She punted to Michigan's 45 Sheehan & Co.....-.-..-25.00
yard line and Snow returns it on the Sigma Chi Freshmen-....... 30.00
next liue up. Notre Dame gets the Trojanowski......,....-.. 10.00
ball for off-side work and kicked to W. S. Parker--------------10.00
Talcott. The ball was steadily worked R. Taylor------------------10.00
down the field and Caley bucks the H. I. Weinstein------------10.00
line the third time for a touchdown. F. W. Potter----------------500
Brown was unfortunate in running Edwin Potter----------------5.00
his head into the goal post on this Tilton....... - 10.00
play but received no serious damage. G. J. Dreiske. - 10.00
The next kick-off was to Michi- H. W. Danforth- - 5.00
gan's 10 yard line where Street got F. Stevens----- -5.00
the ball. Michigan lost the ball for C. C. Smith. - - 5.00
holding, and Fleming tried a place M. Beattie.-----------3.00
kick from the 35 yard line but J. A. Bursley....... ---2.50
missed. Snow kicked out and time E. M. Hulse---------------2.00
was called with the ball in the mid- Neil Snow-2.00
die of the field. F. Engelhard....-- -1.00
The two elevens lined tp as fol- C. K. Gormes--------------1.00
lows: The Associatioc is greatly in need
VARSTY. -oTtE DAME of funds and would deem it a great
Brown.............. - Eg.......Eeman favor on the part of those subscrib-
Caley................ g........Murray ing if they would pay their subscrip-
Steckle.............r. t...........Fortin tions at the earliest possible moment.
White, McDonald....t........McMulty Over $1,600 was subscribed at the
Snow ........ -......er......... arey mass meeting and as can be seen, but
BennettTeetel................Mullen a small portion of that is in the
T aicolt- --.......q.....-Fleming ,
Barabee, Blencoe. ...1. h... .....Kuppler treasurer s hands in the form of
Widman..............r. h...........ins money. Pres. Weinstein urges all
Weeks, Street-------f----Monahan wito subscribed to meet their sub-
Touchdowns Caley 3, Il saabee. Goals scriptions at once as the Association is
from touchdown-Snow 3. Referee--J. deeply in debt andihas-many out-
C. Knight, of Princeton. Umpire- stcplig obtiossy.
Brown, of Cornell. standig oblgations.

The above is a cut of the Bulletin Board which, in accordance with
the DAILY's progressive and up-to-date policy, has been established at the
Athletic Field by the DAILY for the purpose of affording those present a
complete report as the game progresses, of the downs, yards to gain and the
side which is in possession of the ball. The board was used for the first
time at the Notre Dame game last Saturday and scored a complete success.
It is impossible for everyone on both sides of the field as well as in the
grandstand and bleachers to keep track of the number of downs, yards to
gain, etc., as their only method of information is through the referee, Who
can not be heard all over the field. This difficulty is entirely obviated by
the Bulletin Board. The operator at the board receives his information
from a signalman who follows the linemen at the side of the field and sig-
nals the number of downs, etc., as soon as announced by the referee, so
that the inforcuation furnished by the bulletin is entirely authentic. The
idea was originated by O. H. Hans, business manager of the DAILY, who
designed the board and operated it at Saturday's game.

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