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April 28, 1899 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1899-04-28

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VOL. IX, No. 152. ANN ARBOR, MICH., FRIDAY, APRIL 28, 1899. THREE CENTS.

G. H. WILD CO.
Will announce that we have now
received our Spring and Summer
Woolens. Our stock for the incom-
ing season is the largest we have ever
shown, is exclusive and confined, in
both foreign and domestic goods, and
is composed of the best fabrics in
every line that can be obtained. We
carry the largest line of Woolens in
the city. We invite you to call and
inspect the same.
G. H. WILD CO.
108 E. Washington St ,
ANN ARBOR.
Warranted
Cutlery.
We have just received a
fine line of High Grade
:tazors and Knives, fully
warranted, and we sell them
right too. See our window.
0061 Da and Niht.
During the rest of the college year we
williserror lonehes atoall hours, day or
right. Fol line of Pipes, Cigars, and
Tobacco.
R. E. JOLLY & CO.,
308 So. State Street.
Fresh
Strawberries
- AT TE-
Soda Fountain
Todayy

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Detroit Alumni Cup.
The Detroit Alumni Association
of the University has consented to
give a cup for the winners in the
intersociety debates. The cup is a
large one fifteen inches high, of
beautiful design, and has sufficient
room to engrave the name of the
winning society on for 20 years. The
society winning the debating series
each year will have its name en-
graved on the cup and keep it until
it is won away from it by another
society in future contests. The
society whose name appears most
often il the 20 years will at the end
of that tite be given the cup perma-
nently as a trophy. Thus far this
year the Adelphi has defeated the
Webster, and the Jeffersonian the
Alpha Nu. These two winners will
meet it final debate for the first place
on the cup on Friday, May 12.
The Great Band.
Last May Mr. Charles A. E.
Harriss brought Lieut. Dan Godfrey
and his British Guards Band out
from London to Canada. The en-
gagement entered itto was for three
weeks. The success was so stupend-
ous that the engagement was extend-
ed to seven weeks, duritg which
time some 80 concerts were given in
the Dominion, at which over 223,000
persons paid admission. The receipts
it Montreal, were in excess of $6,000
whilst the receipts it Toronto ap-
proximated closely to $10,000, prob.
ably the largest receipts ever earned
in o y two days by any other milt-
TO R
Y
LIEUT. DAN GODFREY.

sonorous in tone, well balanced, and
under admirable control by its con-
ductor. The band is in itself an or-
ganization that is certainly to be
praised and enjoyed wherever it goes.
It is really admirable, nuch of its
excellence being due to the skill of
the principal solo instruments. It is
seldom that the public is privileged
to hear such musical cornet playing
as Mr. Kettlewell displays, whilst
Lieut. Godfrey's familiarity with the
tastes of the American public seems
to be complete, and much pleasure
can be counted upon from is visit.
PROGRAM.
1. Overture, "Robin Hood"... Macfarren
(Performed by Lieut. Godfrey's Band at
the Peace Jubilee 1872.)
2. Selection, "Tannhausei," (Solos
for principal performers)... Wagner
3 Flute Solo, 'Le Carnival de
Venise".................. Briccialdi
MR. REDFERN.
4. "Valse Brilliante"............Chopin
5. Cornet Solo, "The Holy City',....
....................Stephen Adams
MR. KETT.EwELL.
e. Selection, "The Gondoliers".. Sullivan
7. March,"The British Guards."...
... . . . . . . . . . . .H arries
MR. BYRNE.
8. Humorous Musical Sketch, "The
Drummer's Dilemmt"........yrne
MR. svaa.
In which one drummer introduces the
following instruments: Tympani, Bass
and Side Drum, Cymbals, Triangle,
Tambourine, Castagnettes, Imitations
of Spurs, Bells, Whips, Glockenspiel,
Xylophone.
MR. BYRNE.
9. Coronation March...... .Meyrbesr
The Star Spangled Banner.
God Save the Queen,
Dean Hutchins To Staq.
The rumor has been persistently
circulated that Dean Hutchins of the
Law Department had been offered
and had accepted the presidency of
Iowa University. Dean Hutchins
has gone West and will probably not
return until Sunday, so that no in-
formation could be secured from him.
Mrs. Hutchins denied the whole story
and said: "I do not believe there is
anything in it." Secretary Johnson
of the Law Department said he be-
lieved Dean Hutchins had received a
very flattering offer from Iowa, but
did not know whether lie would ac-
cept it.
The Washtenaw Evening Times re-
ceived a telegram from Secretary
Haddock, of the Iowa State Univer-
sity, at noon yesterday, in which he
stated that the presidency had not
been tendered to Dean Hutchins, nor
considered at all. Coning from
Iowa City this information would
seem to be correct. It would be wel-
come news here.
There is no foundation in the
stories that Prof. Knowlton was to
become dean of the Illinois Law
School, and that Prof. Mechem was
to go to Harvard. Prof. Knowlton
when asked by the DAILY in regard
to the matter said that was the first
he bad heard of it, and that be had
not been approached on the subject
of going to Illinois,
Normalites.
The next Normal Club meeting
will be held at the home of Mr. Soule,,
708 South University Ave., Fridayt
evening April 28.

NO SOPHMORES.
Freshmen Not Disturbed in Their
Annual Banquet.
The freshman banquet was given
last night at Granger's and passed
off without the usual accompaniment
of ruling attd hair cuttitg. The
few who itdulged in tiis sport be-
fore vacation were so strongly ad-
monished that no one seemed to
venture to continue the custom.
There was no disturbance at the
banquet and everything moved
smoothly.
About 30 couples attended. The
decorations were very elaborate and
tasty, and the music was excellent.
The annual addresses were made by
the class officers, the first being by
the President Mr. Fred O. Tomp-
son; Miss Edna F. Cummings re-
sponded as poetess, followed by
August H. Roth as historian, the
future of the class was foretold by
Miss Vive B. Perrin and the oration
given by Mr. S. W. Utley.
Josepi Gardner Standart, Sigma
Phi, acted as toastmaster. The fol-
lowing toasts were responded to: The'
Faculty by Alfred J. Kinnucan,
Theta Delta Chi; The Victorious M,
by Harold R. Finney, Zeta Phi; In-
dependents, by Frank J. Bayley,
Phi Delta Theta; Fraternities, by
George Schmid; Girls, by Scott
Turner, Psi Upsilon; Boys of '02,
by Dorothy E. Fowler, Sorosis; The
yellow and blue by Oscar James
Campbell, Delta Kappa Epsilon.
Winthrop Withington, Psi Upsil-
on, was general chairman of the
banquet.
D. O Boudeman, Alpha Delta
Phi, R. J. Bidwell, Theta Delta Chi,
and Chas. S. Lush, Chi Psi, acted as
the reception committee assisted by
Mesdames Atgell, Hutchins, Vaugh-
an and Morris.
Arrangements-A. G. Browne,
Defta Epsilon, F. E. Cooley, Sigma
Phi, and C. G. Parnall, Phi Kappa
Psi.
Invitations-C. S. Hughes, Sigma
Alpha Epsilon, J. E. Hanraan, Sig-
ma Chi, C. S. Sfit, Alpha Delta
Phi, Miss C. E. Hosie, Gamma Phi
Beta.
Decoration- S. R. Hayard, Chi
Psi, R. S. Knight, Sigma Chi, and
Miss Leila E. Kelley, Alpha Phi.
The banquet was followed by an
order of ten dances.
Todat's Games.
Wisconsin at Notre Dame.
Illinois at Beloit.
BASEBALL SCORES.
Lehigh 5, Princeton 4.
Dartmouth 7, Harvard 5.
Holy Cross 7, Yale 6.
Notre Dame 12, Fort Wayne 6.
Northwestern 11, Englewood High
3.
The Inlander will appear today.
The current number has beside a
good bit of fiction an article by Prof.
Wenley on "Kipling the Rhapso-
dist."
Season Tickets for Baseball
Games Now on Sale. 8 Games
for $2.00. Tickets admit to Ill-
inois game.

I

of

CRUSH 10c. tary band in the world. Eleven
Im performances in all were given in
Calkins' Pharmacy Toronto, at the last of which 21,000
people were present. Mr. Harriss,
Yo r Ncontemplating an American tour in
YI 1899, decided at the close of his
Engraved on copper Prate, Canadian tour last summer, and
wit100lateststylecards,for $1.50 prior to the return of the band to
England, in order to test the critics
toe cards, engraved from your own plate, for of the New York press and the gen-
90 CENTS. eral feeling of the public, to give a
The Best Stock, few concerts in New York. The press
The Latest Styles. proved unanimous in their verdict of
Ask to see our new Stationery. commendation. The public were de-
lighted. Scenes of the greatest en-
W A S thusiasm were witnessed and unpre-
cedented were the ovations tendered
the great leader and his band by the
ANN ARBOR audiences which nightly crowded the
UIp row.n Dow Town building.
State So. Opp. nr. sTs It is a fine military orchestra,

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