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March 11, 1899 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1899-03-11

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2

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN DAILY.

2 THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN DAILY.

2+4
Published Daily (Sundays excepted) during the
College year.at
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN.
'hrrieo: The Inland Press, Henning Block.
Both Phones 147.
MANAGING EDITOR.
F. ENGELHARD, '01 L.
BUSINESS MANAGER.
o. H. ANs,'00 L.
EDITORS.
Athletic Editor, T. R. Woonow,'00 L.
P. W. Jonas, '3, A. H. MDoUOALL, '01 E,
F. D.EAMAN,'00 C. H. LUND,'00M,
G. D. HUDNUT , '01 E. J. B. Woon'i.
The subscription price of the DAILY is 82.50 for
the enlee yaer, with a regular deliery hefore
nn each day. Notice, omusnication, and
other matter intended for pblication must be
handed inat the DItY offce efoen8 S"p.,tor
mailed to the editorbefoe Ip. ti. of theday
previous to that on which they are expected to
appear.
ubscriptions may be left at the DAILY offie,
Meyer's, or Stoflet's newstand, or with Bones
Manager. Shsciee will confer a faoreeby
reporting promptly at this office any failure of
aresr to delie paper.
Allhanget in advetisin matter mst be in
the office by 4 p. m. on the say previous to that
on which they are to appear.
IN CHARFE OF TODAY'S ISU,
A. H. McDOUGALL.
Latin in the Hiqh School.
"A Partial Inventory of the Ped-
agogical Values of Latin," was the
title of the paper read by Prof.
Drake before the Pedagogical Society
Monday evenisg. The following
extract of the paper was furnished
to the DAILY by the secretary:
Education was originally mainly
classical; even now the classics retain
an honorable and important place in
our curriculum. The advantages
usually claimed for classical study
by teachers of the classics are: disci-
pline, culture, and training of the
observation, and judgment. This
last is the practical side, appreciated
by the practical man, who sneers at
the former as theory.
On the other band, classical study
has its disadvantages. In ths first
place, memory is neglected. It is
generally conceded that classical stu-
dents have no memory left by the
time they have reached their sopho-
more year in the university. This is
a result, partially, .of the reaction
against the old memory-education.
Both the old and the new view of
education are false. It is true that
a student has not made a subject his
own when he has studied and learned
the words; but it does not therefore
follow that he knows a subject when
he has gone through with the logical
processes involved without remem-
bering them. Further, the assimil-
ating and coordinating powers of the
mind are not trained by classical
study. The best among the classical
students find it hard to go through a
book and get the salient points.
Can we not, while retaining our
grasp on what classical study does
give us, remedy its defects? The
only recent advance made in teach-
ing Latin is embodied in Hale's "Art
of Reading Latin." In this the at.
tention is turned from the logical
processes of the study of construc-
tion, and stress is laid on the art of
reading the language. But this is
not sufficient. We hear a good deal
about "enriching the classical course."
This can best be done by emphasiz-
ing the side of Roman life that has
the most significance for the modern
world. The aim of Latin study is
the -ideal reconstruction of Roman
civilization; the best instrument for

this is the study of Roman constitu-
tional antiquities. It is better than
the study of private antiquities be-
cause: Systematization is easy; mate-
rial is at hand; preparation for teach-
ing can be made in this country;
itarticulates with our present classical
course. Cicero is an excellent basis.
As to method: A text-book, with
proper supplemental helps should be
used. It should be given its about
20 lessons, and probably best at the
begiuning of the Cicero year.
The story of Roman constitutional
antiquties has a future; it is fruitful
in suggestion for the student; it re-
lates the ancient to the modern world.
A NIGHT OFF.
[Continued From Page 1.~
Detroit, these will not be accepted.
The performance will be given
here at the Athens, on the evening
of Saturday, April 1. The cast in
full is as follows:
Justinian Babbitt, Professor of his-
tory in the Camptown university.
..................Richard H. Sutphen
Harry Damask, his sonin-law.....
.Win. A. Comtock
Marcus Brutus Snp, under various
aliases, in pursuit of fortune.
...Jerome J. Crowley
Jack Mulberry, a fellow actor of
Snap..................Ralph H. Page
Lord Mulberry, in pursuit of Jack..
.Lafayette Young
Prowl, an usher at the university...
.....................Evans Holbrook
Mrs. Zantippa Babbitt, professor of
conjugal management in Prof.
Babbitt's household ............
............Miss Euphemia G. Holden
Angelica Damask, the eldest........
....................Marguerite Gibson
Nisbe, the youngest...........
. . . . . . . ..Mi s s F r a n c e s . C l a r k
Susan,"the"brassiest"...........
...................Miss Sybil Stewart
Maria, Servant at Damask's........
...........Miss Alice G. Burdsal
S. C. A. Meeting.
The Sunday morning devotional
meeting at 9:15 in Newbery Hall will
be addressed by the Rev. C. E. Bron-
son, D. D., pastor of the First Pres-
byterian church at Saginaw. All
students are especially invited.
Prof. Ernest H. Mensel, Ph. D.
begins Sunday noon, his series of
talks on "The Christian and the Old
Testament," in the Parlors of the
Presbyterian church. This is a sub-
ject which will prove of special inter-
est to students. All are cordially in-
vited.
J. W. Judson, '00, who left col-
lege last year to join the Michigan
Naval Reserves and who served on
Yosemite during the war, has re-
turned to college and is taking work
in the Law Department.
UNIVERSITY BAND --There are
positions in the University Band for
a first class clarinet and second trom-
bone. These positions to be filled at
once, apply to E. P. de Pont, Mack
& Co.
The usual program party at
Granger's tonight.
1 1

IF YOU FAIL THE
INLAND PRESS
To find it anywhere ANN ARBOR
else, try us . . ,..
e Printers, Binders, i
J. i1Quarry, -AND-
BLANK-BOOK MAKERS
Campus Drug Store. :
HENNING BLOCK
COLLEGE STUDENTS
r THE
COUNTRY
OVE R
Suruu's WNSMOK E
SurDru'S601d61 S66ptr6
~I~ -
Prices from $15 Up.
9r
t in
3_ Ahe
World
C OLLEGE men everywhere are invited to send for the Washburn Souvenir Catalog.
Itcontains nearly30portraitsofartists andcollegians, besides givingsome sccount
of the construction o Washburn instruments and a complete list of net prices.
First-class music dealersnthe world over sell Washburns, or instruments may be
obtained from the makers
LYON & HEALY, CHICAGO.

This space belongs to the Students' Lecture Association.

1899 Crescents M. STAEBLER'S
t $35.00
Crescent Bevel Gear Chain- Cycle Emporium,
less, - - - $60.00
Juveniles, - - - 25.00 119 WEST WASHINGTON ST.,
All itted with Dunlap Detachable Tires. ANN ARBOR.
GRANGER'S SCHOOL OF DANCING.

7 r1+ $$5.00 per Term of 12 Weeks.
PROGRAMME PARTY EACH SATURDAY EVENING.
TJnT-ATD'IE Private Lessons by Appointment. Bell 'Phone 246.
So is or famous Ire Cream, hot
the difference is that the colder
it gets the more of our cream
you want.
MAC WHITEs
ISPrettyCod 110 S.tMAIN ST.
Sell Phone, 166;. State, 194.

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